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Old 09-29-2015, 04:29 AM
 
8 posts, read 7,419 times
Reputation: 22

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Florida is dying. You may not see it today, but it is.

I'm a Millennial (b. 1998). My generation is still young -- though our oldest members are in their 30s -- but our life goals are clear and radically divergent from those of our Boomer grand/parents. We have little interest on the whole in living in suburbia, drowning when the unchecked global warming allowed by short-sighted Boomer politicians becomes even less deniable, or going anywhere near the concept of Florida. Florida may be paradise to our elders, but to us it is the home state of Florida Man, a tacky mess of a state with everything wrong with it.

The only people under 30 who like Florida are the ones who live either there or somewhere even worse, and even then it's 50/50 at best.

When the retirees stop coming, it won't be long before the state collapses.
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Old 09-29-2015, 06:52 AM
 
21,207 posts, read 30,420,192 times
Reputation: 19655
In terms of the biggest population boom (raw actual numbers) the Orlando metro area ranks first in the state followed by Jacksonville and the Tampa Bay area. From 2000-2012 the Orlando MSA added 566K (34.2%) and is maintaining an annual growth rate around 2.5%. Jacksonville added 250K (22.3%) from 2000-2012 and is maintaining close to 1.7% per year in growth. Tampa Bay added 438K (18.2%) from 2000-2012 and is maintaining 1.4% annual growth. Nationally Orlando ranks 4th in growth percentage from 2000-2012, while Jacksonville was 13th and Tampa Bay 19th.

America's Fastest- and Slowest-Growing Cities | Newgeography.com
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Old 09-29-2015, 07:19 AM
 
422 posts, read 303,259 times
Reputation: 607
Quote:
Originally Posted by psychorase View Post
Florida is dying. You may not see it today, but it is.

I'm a Millennial (b. 1998). My generation is still young -- though our oldest members are in their 30s -- but our life goals are clear and radically divergent from those of our Boomer grand/parents. We have little interest on the whole in living in suburbia, drowning when the unchecked global warming allowed by short-sighted Boomer politicians becomes even less deniable, or going anywhere near the concept of Florida. Florida may be paradise to our elders, but to us it is the home state of Florida Man, a tacky mess of a state with everything wrong with it.

The only people under 30 who like Florida are the ones who live either there or somewhere even worse, and even then it's 50/50 at best.

When the retirees stop coming, it won't be long before the state collapses.
Agree Florida is peaking/has peaked. You will never see growth the last 20 years here again.

The recession proved just how fragile the state was when it came to "growth".

Most millenials I know see florida as "tacky" and lame, the West Coast and Texas are the hot spots for millenials IMO.
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Old 09-29-2015, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Spring Hill Florida
12,135 posts, read 13,266,490 times
Reputation: 6010
So when are all you gloom and doom people leaving? The statistics prove your opinions as incorrect. The younger generations want excitement and a "keep busy" life style. They migrate to cities. They will get into their late 30's and early 40's and wonder what on earth were they thinking and look towards a slower paced less expensive way of life.

Migration came to a virtual halt NATIONWIDE during the Great Recession and has returned to more normal rates.

If I was in the 18-30 year old age group and lived in a rust belt state or in the midwest I would certainly be looking at relocation to a more vibrant economy and lifestyle. According to the U.S. census 6 Florida metro areas were among the 20 fastest-growing in the nation. The Villages, Cape Coral-Fort Myers, Naples-Immokalee-Marco Island, Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, North Port-Sarasota-Bradenton and Panama City.

According to Moody’s Analytics, Florida has six of the top 10 metro areas when it comes to the highest forecasted employment growth. Leading the way is retirement hot spot Naples with projected annual gains of 4.6% through 2017, according to Moody’s Analytics. “Areas like Naples are adding jobs at a faster rate because of the population growth among baby boomers,”

I guess the "tacky and lame" thinking of the gloom and doom crowd is very limited. The Census reported Florida averaged 803 new residents each day between July 1, 2013, and July 1, 2014, growing by 293,000 to reach 19.9 million during that time period.

Sure, lots of younger people are headed to or have arrived in the west coast. Hi-tech is what's happening there but, as some of you already know, it is impossible to survive in hi-tech unless you have the education and skill base required for those jobs and large tech companies only want cream of the crop people on their payroll.

Fact: Net migration into Naples is the third highest rate in the U.S. over the past five years. Even with the population gains, unemployment has plummeted from a peak of 12.2% in 2010 to a recent 5%. Another Naples perk: the third lowest crime rate in the U.S.

The census and people who actually analyze facts and figures are the source of solid information, not assumptions by people who hate where they live but do nothing to change it.
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Old 09-29-2015, 08:50 AM
 
8 posts, read 7,419 times
Reputation: 22
Ah, but we aren't leaving. We weren't there at all.

Millennials chase after cities, but there are cities in places other than Florida. Young people tend to head West, and though you point to the coastal cities they actually aren't quite as strong a symbol as you think. Denver is definitely the city that most symbolizes where Millennials go and how they change the places they move to, though Portland is fairly close for those slightly wealthier and is on the coast. Not every Millennial hotspot is an SF-style tech-obsessed mess. Another city to have seen huge Millennial growth is Austin, which is absolutely not coastal and probably not even Western depending on how you define Texas.

I don't live in America, but I live in my country's equivalent of the rust belt and will be headed to the US at the first possible opportunity (helps that I know more about it than I do my home country). Just like my peers, I'm after vibrant city life...which those places you mentioned absolutely do not offer, in my mind and the mind of my peers, by any stretch of the imagination. Orlando? Panama City? Cape Coral?! You may as well be listing off random Nebraska towns and claiming they're the new hotspots -- at least they don't get the mad news reports everywhere in Florida does! (I chase excitement, but the excitement I chase is not anything you see in repositories of Florida news. I have no interest in living anywhere with a meth problem.)

Florida gets a lot of population growth and will continue to until all the Boomers wanting to move there have. This will take a while, but it does not mean that you will be any better off when it ends.
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Old 09-29-2015, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Seminole County, FL
9,697 posts, read 6,648,918 times
Reputation: 12170
Quote:
Originally Posted by psychorase View Post
Ah, but we aren't leaving. We weren't there at all.

Millennials chase after cities, but there are cities in places other than Florida. Young people tend to head West, and though you point to the coastal cities they actually aren't quite as strong a symbol as you think. Denver is definitely the city that most symbolizes where Millennials go and how they change the places they move to, though Portland is fairly close for those slightly wealthier and is on the coast. Not every Millennial hotspot is an SF-style tech-obsessed mess. Another city to have seen huge Millennial growth is Austin, which is absolutely not coastal and probably not even Western depending on how you define Texas.

I don't live in America, but I live in my country's equivalent of the rust belt and will be headed to the US at the first possible opportunity (helps that I know more about it than I do my home country). Just like my peers, I'm after vibrant city life...which those places you mentioned absolutely do not offer, in my mind and the mind of my peers, by any stretch of the imagination. Orlando? Panama City? Cape Coral?! You may as well be listing off random Nebraska towns and claiming they're the new hotspots -- at least they don't get the mad news reports everywhere in Florida does! (I chase excitement, but the excitement I chase is not anything you see in repositories of Florida news. I have no interest in living anywhere with a meth problem.)

Florida gets a lot of population growth and will continue to until all the Boomers wanting to move there have. This will take a while, but it does not mean that you will be any better off when it ends.

Meth is a problem everywhere in the U.S... And beyond.

Also, why would you compare Orlando to a random Nebraska town? You do realize Metro Orlando is pretty big, right?
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Old 09-29-2015, 10:23 AM
 
60 posts, read 47,613 times
Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
In terms of the biggest population boom (raw actual numbers) the Orlando metro area ranks first in the state followed by Jacksonville and the Tampa Bay area. From 2000-2012 the Orlando MSA added 566K (34.2%) and is maintaining an annual growth rate around 2.5%. Jacksonville added 250K (22.3%) from 2000-2012 and is maintaining close to 1.7% per year in growth. Tampa Bay added 438K (18.2%) from 2000-2012 and is maintaining 1.4% annual growth. Nationally Orlando ranks 4th in growth percentage from 2000-2012, while Jacksonville was 13th and Tampa Bay 19th.

America's Fastest- and Slowest-Growing Cities | Newgeography.com
That article is a couple years old. Does anyone know of some statistics from this year? When do they publish the census statistics?
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Old 09-29-2015, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Spring Hill Florida
12,135 posts, read 13,266,490 times
Reputation: 6010
I did not post my opinion, I posted factual information gathered by credible sources.

I dont worry about population growth. I have the Gulf of Mexico directly west, A state forest to the east and a mostly rural area to my north. South of me is the northern end of growth.

As I stated, once the millennials reach a mature age their thinking will change.

A "vibrant city life" is very expensive so I hope you come with the necessary skills, experience and credentials to earn the income required to live comfortably in one of those "hot spots"

Quote:
Originally Posted by psychorase View Post
Ah, but we aren't leaving. We weren't there at all.

Millennials chase after cities, but there are cities in places other than Florida. Young people tend to head West, and though you point to the coastal cities they actually aren't quite as strong a symbol as you think. Denver is definitely the city that most symbolizes where Millennials go and how they change the places they move to, though Portland is fairly close for those slightly wealthier and is on the coast. Not every Millennial hotspot is an SF-style tech-obsessed mess. Another city to have seen huge Millennial growth is Austin, which is absolutely not coastal and probably not even Western depending on how you define Texas.

I don't live in America, but I live in my country's equivalent of the rust belt and will be headed to the US at the first possible opportunity (helps that I know more about it than I do my home country). Just like my peers, I'm after vibrant city life...which those places you mentioned absolutely do not offer, in my mind and the mind of my peers, by any stretch of the imagination. Orlando? Panama City? Cape Coral?! You may as well be listing off random Nebraska towns and claiming they're the new hotspots -- at least they don't get the mad news reports everywhere in Florida does! (I chase excitement, but the excitement I chase is not anything you see in repositories of Florida news. I have no interest in living anywhere with a meth problem.)

Florida gets a lot of population growth and will continue to until all the Boomers wanting to move there have. This will take a while, but it does not mean that you will be any better off when it ends.
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Old 09-29-2015, 10:31 AM
 
422 posts, read 303,259 times
Reputation: 607
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcenal352 View Post
Also, why would you compare Orlando to a random Nebraska town? You do realize Metro Orlando is pretty big, right?
Because you cant compare to Orlando to a city like Austin or Seattle its a joke in every aspect of the comparison, and its funny you have to say "Orlando Metro" implying the sprawl of 4 counties incorporates the city itself (which people from florida seem to be proud of).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spring Hillian View Post
I did not post my opinion, I posted factual information gathered by credible sources...

...once the millennials reach a mature age their thinking will change.
this guy.
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Old 09-29-2015, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Spring Hill Florida
12,135 posts, read 13,266,490 times
Reputation: 6010
Quote:
Originally Posted by psychorase View Post
Ah, but we aren't leaving. We weren't there at all.

Millennials chase after cities, but there are cities in places other than Florida. Young people tend to head West, and though you point to the coastal cities they actually aren't quite as strong a symbol as you think. Denver is definitely the city that most symbolizes where Millennials go and how they change the places they move to, though Portland is fairly close for those slightly wealthier and is on the coast. Not every Millennial hotspot is an SF-style tech-obsessed mess. Another city to have seen huge Millennial growth is Austin, which is absolutely not coastal and probably not even Western depending on how you define Texas.

I don't live in America, but I live in my country's equivalent of the rust belt and will be headed to the US at the first possible opportunity (helps that I know more about it than I do my home country). Just like my peers, I'm after vibrant city life...which those places you mentioned absolutely do not offer, in my mind and the mind of my peers, by any stretch of the imagination. Orlando? Panama City? Cape Coral?! You may as well be listing off random Nebraska towns and claiming they're the new hotspots -- at least they don't get the mad news reports everywhere in Florida does! (I chase excitement, but the excitement I chase is not anything you see in repositories of Florida news. I have no interest in living anywhere with a meth problem.)

Florida gets a lot of population growth and will continue to until all the Boomers wanting to move there have. This will take a while, but it does not mean that you will be any better off when it ends.
Meth, crack, heroin, LSD, Ecstacy and prescription drug use will be found in any town in the US.
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