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View Poll Results: What "mindscape" is New Florida most like?
Wild West 2 2.41%
Heartland 2 2.41%
Dixie 13 15.66%
Yankeedom 11 13.25%
Cuba 0 0%
Meh, it's just Florida 55 66.27%
Voters: 83. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-22-2016, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,515,864 times
Reputation: 1861

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
"But Mexicans have a certain way of acting.
But Arabs have a certain way of acting.
But Indians have a certain way of acting."

You are using stereotypes and discrimination, my friend. You sure you live in Florida and not Hollywood, CA? Not all southerners act like the characters on Dukes of Hazard, and the ones that do, are fine. The south is such a diverse place with a diverse group of people. Not everyone in Alabama likes NASCAR, not everyone has a confederate flag on their porch and a "Roll Tide" bumper sticker. Not everyone has a gun or plays a banjo and fiddle. And again, nothing wrong with that either. What IS wrong is racism and discrimination, and honestly, you're doing that yourself to people from the region you're from no less. You're saying certain people can't have ties to a region because of their religion, or ethnicity. The south is a region and to many, white, black and brown, it's home. You don't gotta conform to any preconceived notions to BELONG to that region. And overall, they're Americans. America is diverse and the south isn't the insular backwoods region you make it out to be, even if there are some really undesirable areas.

Go to New Orleans, walk along side those beautiful Franco-American buildings and the huge live oak trees and tell me it's "not southern" because it's full of Catholics, Cajuns and Creoles.
You do not get to tell people what they are and what they are not. Most Floridians do NOT identify with the South. Florida, particularly the peninsula, is comprised of transplants from NOT Southern parts of the country and their descendants. This cultural revamping occurred within two generations. Those people didn't move here to become Southern, they moved here and created their own culture that we Floridians are merging into. And it happened at a speed and swiftness that gave birth to a whole new culture entirely.

You call yourself what you wish, but leave Florida's business to Floridians. I find it HILARIOUS, that once again, all the Southerners not from Florida, coming into our Florida forum trying to tell us what we are. All of you need to get with reality.

 
Old 01-22-2016, 06:17 PM
 
3,618 posts, read 1,571,677 times
Reputation: 2194
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happiness-is-close View Post
You do not get to tell people what they are and what they are not. Most Floridians do NOT identify with the South. Florida, particularly the peninsula, is comprised of transplants from NOT Southern parts of the country and their descendants. This cultural revamping occurred within two generations. Those people didn't move here to become Southern, they moved here and created their own culture that we Floridians are merging into. And it happened at a speed and swiftness that gave birth to a whole new culture entirely.

You call yourself what you wish, but leave Florida's business to Floridians. I find it HILARIOUS, that once again, all the Southerners not from Florida, coming into our Florida forum trying to tell us what we are. All of you need to get with reality.
I went to school in Florida, have been in florida since I was a kid, have ancestral roots in florida back to the 1800s and grandparents that have lived in the same home in florida since the 1950's. you have lived in florida all of a whopping twenty something years in a retiree town, you think florida has more in common with the midwest culturally because of where you live in florida and where your ancestors are from.

Your roots are not in florida and never have been.
 
Old 01-22-2016, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Morgantown, WV
469 posts, read 418,847 times
Reputation: 641
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happiness-is-close View Post
Live in the true south sometime like I did and you will understand what I speak of.
I've lived in the South longer than you've been alive. I maintain, you are full of crap, and you are painting an entire region of the country with a very, very wide brush. Quit acting like your views are an authority. They are nothing more than opinions, and clearly biased ones at that.
 
Old 01-22-2016, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,076 posts, read 3,402,168 times
Reputation: 7722
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happiness-is-close View Post
You do not get to tell people what they are and what they are not. Most Floridians do NOT identify with the South. Florida, particularly the peninsula, is comprised of transplants from NOT Southern parts of the country and their descendants. This cultural revamping occurred within two generations. Those people didn't move here to become Southern, they moved here and created their own culture that we Floridians are merging into. And it happened at a speed and swiftness that gave birth to a whole new culture entirely.

You call yourself what you wish, but leave Florida's business to Floridians. I find it HILARIOUS, that once again, all the Southerners not from Florida, coming into our Florida forum trying to tell us what we are. All of you need to get with reality.
Funny, you're doing the exact same thing, stereotyping southerners as being a certain way and saying who is and isn't one. I'm from Florida, what are you talking about? I only been in Texas for a year. I've never met anyone in Florida who is actually from there, and never even been to the north, say they're not a southerner. The idea is silly. Florida is as south as south gets. Is it different? Sure. But, same goes for Louisiana. Kentucky is different too. Apparently you think the south can't be diverse. If it is, it's gotta be it's own region lol How is a state as small as Florida it's own region? I don't care how different you perceive the demographics to be, a mid sized peninsular state does not qualify as a separate entity from its neighbours.
 
Old 01-22-2016, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Morgantown, WV
469 posts, read 418,847 times
Reputation: 641
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happiness-is-close View Post
You do not get to tell people what they are and what they are not.
Really? You seem to have quite a knack for doing just that. You know, with the stereotyping and all. Not to mention the way you try to project your own personal views of the state of Florida as some kind of fact.

You are unreal.
 
Old 01-22-2016, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,076 posts, read 3,402,168 times
Reputation: 7722
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbern100 View Post
Its pointless arguing with happiness , he seems to have no interest in history or other cultures or even floridas history, he lives around lee and collier country, named after southerners,naples was founded by a confederate general, you can just read the history of marco island.

My sister is married to a cuban who worked for the Sabates family, a cuban born rich guy raised in charlotte who is big in nascar and alot of racing teams have cuban connections in nascar, like armando fits racing teams. There have always been strong business connection between cuba and Caribbean and the south, and still are with sugar , tobacco , rum etc, though obviously the relationship with cuba has changed after the revolution. The south was and is still like alot more like the Caribbean and some of south america historically and in alot of culture than they are like alot of the midwest and north

The southern aristocracy was very diverse in new orleans, charleston ,savannah , virginia, mobile,texas, natchez etc was made up of french creoles, spanish aristocracy in natchez and texas and florida, catholic aristocracy in maryland and new orleans.

I mean for the love of god, new orleans history and aristocracy was the most amazing and diverse in the country, they were alot more diverse than the new england puritans

this shows how diverse the south was and still is. the confederados in Brazil, they speak Portuguese, towns in brazil descended from southerners who moved south after the civil war and still keep southern traditions alive. not a homogenized, generic strip mall like so much of the US







https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D93o3kItF-E
Lol just wait, he's gonna talk about how those Brazilians aren't "real Brazilians" because their roots are different from the majority of the Portuguese descended Brazilians. But he claims to be so much more tolerant than those close minded hillbilly southerners he's so separate from
 
Old 01-24-2016, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,515,864 times
Reputation: 1861
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Lol just wait, he's gonna talk about how those Brazilians aren't "real Brazilians" because their roots are different from the majority of the Portuguese descended Brazilians. But he claims to be so much more tolerant than those close minded hillbilly southerners he's so separate from
Not at all. Brazilians, like Americans, are a diverse people.
 
Old 01-26-2016, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Naples Island
1,016 posts, read 645,546 times
Reputation: 2045
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Cuban Americans who are from the south, are southern. Those from the north, are northerners. Is a Cuban American raised in Boston not a New Englander/yankee/northerner?

Being southern is a regional/cultural background, politics and religion varies. Some southerners are Catholics, some are Baptists, some are Jewish, some practise voodoo (New Orleans) some are atheists. Stop pigeonholing an entire region. Not all Midwesterners are Lutheran farmers of Scandinavian origin either.

Yea the upper Midwest does have lots of rednecks, but it's not the same as in the south, and their culture is more influenced from rural southerners than the other way around. I know of a North Dakotan who waved a confederate flag, which is beyond idiotic but okay lol
A Cuban-American born and raised in Boston is certainly a Northerner or, more specifically, a New Englander, but they're certainly not a "Yankee," at least not in the traditional sense of the term.

My great-aunt's husband was a Yankee or, more affectionately, an "old Yankee." He was born in rural northwestern Rhode Island or northeastern Connecticut to a Mainline Protestant family of primarily English extraction who had already been residing in the United States for many generations as of the early 20th century.

To me and most other native New Englanders, that's a true "Yankee."

In New England, those who are descended from Irish, Italian, Portuguese, Polish, etc. ancestors don't typically consider or refer to themselves as "Yankees," but they do often apply that term to New Englanders descended from British (albeit mostly English) ancestors.

Perhaps you're not from New England or the South, so you're unfamiliar with the social meanings of the terms "Yankee" and "Southerner," but I can assure you that the previous poster, happiness-is-close, was not using the term "Southerner" in the literal sense, but rather describing the social meaning of the term and the embodiment of the concept of what it means to be Southern.

It just so happens that the term, "Southern," also doubles as the commonly applied demonym for people from that geographical region of the United States. Enter the confusion and disconnect, especially from outsiders.

There's slightly less confusion with regard to the term "Yankee" and the cultural embodiment it describes because "Yankee" is not the mainstream demonym for people from New England or other areas of the northern United States, at least outside of the South.

You have to really have grown up in at least a third or fourth-generation Southern American household to truly understand the embodiment of the cultural, religious and political Southern heritage to which that previous poster was referring. Ditto Yankee heritage for native New Englanders.

So again, a third-generation Italian-American born in Atlanta might be a Southerner, but that does not make them "Southern." Likewise, a second-generation Cuban-American born in Boston might be a Northerner or New Englander, but that certainly does not make them "Yankee" by stretch of the imagination.

Semantics, but you get the point.

Last edited by Bert_from_back_East; 01-26-2016 at 12:41 PM..
 
Old 01-26-2016, 01:06 PM
 
1,444 posts, read 1,936,515 times
Reputation: 1164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
A Cuban-American born and raised in Boston is certainly a Northerner or, more specifically, a New Englander, but they're certainly not a "Yankee," at least not in the traditional sense of the term.

My great-aunt's husband was a Yankee or, more affectionately, an "old Yankee." He was born in rural northwestern Rhode Island or northeastern Connecticut to a Mainline Protestant family of primarily English extraction who had already been residing in the United States for many generations as of the early 20th century.

To me and most other native New Englanders, that's a true "Yankee."

In New England, those who are descended from Irish, Italian, Portuguese, Polish, etc. ancestors don't typically consider or refer to themselves as "Yankees," but they do often apply that term to New Englanders descended from British (albeit mostly English) ancestors.

Perhaps you're not from New England or the South, so you're unfamiliar with the social meanings of the terms "Yankee" and "Southerner," but I can assure you that the previous poster, happiness-is-close, was not using the term "Southerner" in the literal sense, but rather describing the social meaning of the term and the embodiment of the concept of what it means to be Southern.

It just so happens that the term, "Southern," also doubles as the commonly applied demonym for people from that geographical region of the United States. Enter the confusion and disconnect, especially from outsiders.

There's slightly less confusion with regard to the term "Yankee" and the cultural embodiment it describes because "Yankee" is not the mainstream demonym for people from New England or other areas of the northern United States, at least outside of the South.

You have to really have grown up in at least a third or fourth-generation Southern American household to truly understand the embodiment of the cultural, religious and political Southern heritage to which that previous poster was referring. Ditto Yankee heritage for native New Englanders.

So again, a third-generation Italian-American born in Atlanta might be a Southerner, but that does not make them "Southern." Likewise, a second-generation Cuban-American born in Boston might be a Northerner or New Englander, but that certainly does not make them "Yankee" by stretch of the imagination.

Semantics, but you get the point.
So would that person be a Southerner if his ancestors immigrated to New Orleans and settled in rural Arkansas? And they live a lifestyle and have a similar world view to their neighbors

I am from a 6 or 7 generation Florida family on my moms side so I understand the "Southern" culture. I was raised in NJ so I have an outsiders perspective as well. The South is more diverse than many realize or consider.

All the examples I have given in my posts on this thread are real people( Arabs, Italians, Cubans)... And I am certain if your or Happiness is bumped into anyone of them at a gas station in Yulee you would not think they were not Southerners

Last edited by jwolfer; 01-26-2016 at 01:16 PM..
 
Old 01-26-2016, 01:10 PM
 
3,618 posts, read 1,571,677 times
Reputation: 2194
I see what you are saying bert but I dont agree with that in terms of the south. the southern aristocracy was alot more diverse than the early puritans to new england. it included french ,spanish, creole, huguenots, sephardic jews in charleston ,new orleans alone was home to numerous races in the aristocracy. It was a much more diverse society in power than what is in power today

this was true across the caribbean and south america. there was a plan actually hatched that had the south joining the caribbean and parts of south america after the civil war. So much of the south had connections to the caribbean and latin america
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