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Old 06-03-2016, 08:07 PM
KPB
 
1,102 posts, read 522,179 times
Reputation: 890

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My Mom has a friend who was telling her about a fabric material used to cover windows to prevent damage. Its suppose to be stronger than the metal type cover's and easier to install w/ clips that come with it. I've never heard of it so I just googled it and found this company Hurricane Protection | Hurricane Shutters | Storm Shutters | Hurricane Fabric
I think its sold at Lowe's or Home Depot.

Has anyone bought or used anything like this?
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Old 06-03-2016, 10:41 PM
 
Location: Florida
2,995 posts, read 1,372,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
It looks like each county's emergency management website has the list of emergency shelters, so you could check on your county's site and see if it is.

We're seeing FPL replacing a number of the old wood power poles around here with concrete poles around here too. And those concrete poles look strong enough to survive a nuclear blast, but I'm not so sure they're much stronger than the wooden poles, from what I have seen happen to them when they get hit, or even in a strong hurricane.We had concrete poles in Miami, and were very surprised to see the large number of those poles that broke, and/or fell over in hurricane Andrew. I recall their blocking the streets for days in southern Dade county, till they could be removed. We also saw an accident in Arcadia not too long ago involving an SUV that ran off the road and hit a concrete pole. We were surprised when that pole fell over, it appeared to be knocked off its base. I'd expect this might happen with a vehicle traveling at a high rate of speed, but they weren't going all that fast. Those poles are hollow down at their bases, but I don' t know if they are hollow all the way I (I would guess they are).
Travelassie I went through Andrew in south Miami-Dade county and those FP&L concrete power poles were along on Coral Reef Drive / SW 152 st. and they were snapped like twigs!
Just amazing to see these 100 + foot poles shattered.

I spent 3 weeks or more without power , I remember the nightly curfews and how hard gas was to find. Hurricane Andrew was supposed to head north of Miami and within 24 hours it made a buzz saw straight west towards southern Miami Dade county.

Be prepared !
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Old 06-03-2016, 11:16 PM
KPB
 
1,102 posts, read 522,179 times
Reputation: 890
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobdreamz View Post
Travelassie I went through Andrew in south Miami-Dade county and those FP&L concrete power poles were along on Coral Reef Drive / SW 152 st. and they were snapped like twigs!
Just amazing to see these 100 + foot poles shattered.

I spent 3 weeks or more without power , I remember the nightly curfews and how hard gas was to find. Hurricane Andrew was supposed to head north of Miami and within 24 hours it made a buzz saw straight west towards southern Miami Dade county.

Be prepared !
Y'all got hit pretty hard down there. A lot of building codes were changed due to that storm. I've been in Tampa since '74 and we've been over due for a long time. We haven't had a major hurricane hit Tampa in almost 100 years. (knock on wood)
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Old 06-04-2016, 07:17 AM
 
8,045 posts, read 6,106,762 times
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I never do anything. Lived here 53 years next week and never seen a storm yet.
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Old 06-04-2016, 07:20 AM
 
8,045 posts, read 6,106,762 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetbottoms View Post
30+ year resident. I don't even bat an eye unless it's nearing a cat 3 and then I may just fill the tubs. Have yet to evacuate, it's harder to get back in than get out. Most of the time they don't let you back in to even assess damage and you're stuck floundering between hotels and trying again and again. . Even for Wilma which was cat 5 then 4 on impact I stuck around.

The news will try and scare you and hype everyone up. Everything is "get your supplies now , stock up for 2 weeks" etc etc. you see mass chaos 9 days out where people are fighting over and friggin can of soup. It's a lost cause half the time. Wait till about 3 days before. You'll have a better idea where impact is. Even then it's not certain. Charlie changed course 2 hours before impact and destroyed Port Charlotte. Was suppose to hit Tampa area. I mostly take anything in from the porch, fill
The tubs and have some water handy. The stores won't be down for weeks so food will be available sooner than you think. If yore lucky enough to be on the same switch board as a shelter you'll have power quick. I've never gone longer than 2 days.
The news chans and Home depot are in it together to make money. They always blow it up and nothing ever happens.
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Old 06-04-2016, 07:23 AM
 
Location: USA's #1 MSA 4 Years Running
8,569 posts, read 7,306,320 times
Reputation: 4885
Quote:
Originally Posted by KPB View Post
My Mom has a friend who was telling her about a fabric material used to cover windows to prevent damage. Its suppose to be stronger than the metal type cover's and easier to install w/ clips that come with it. I've never heard of it so I just googled it and found this company Hurricane Protection | Hurricane Shutters | Storm Shutters | Hurricane Fabric
I think its sold at Lowe's or Home Depot.

Has anyone bought or used anything like this?
I have read about it and heard many great things. I think this is the approach we will use, when we finally get to protecting our insanely cheap/lousy 1990's single pane windows. I honestly have no idea how they made it this long without sustaining damage, as there are no signs of them ever being protected.
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Old 06-04-2016, 07:29 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
8,018 posts, read 5,042,519 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobdreamz View Post
Travelassie I went through Andrew in south Miami-Dade county and those FP&L concrete power poles were along on Coral Reef Drive / SW 152 st. and they were snapped like twigs!
Just amazing to see these 100 + foot poles shattered.

I spent 3 weeks or more without power , I remember the nightly curfews and how hard gas was to find. Hurricane Andrew was supposed to head north of Miami and within 24 hours it made a buzz saw straight west towards southern Miami Dade county.

Be prepared !
That's a visual you'll never forget. I was thinking of all those poles along Coral Reef Drive as I posted about the broken concrete power poles. I remember trying to get from Palmetto Bay (where we lived), to Country Walk with my mother, to see what might be left of her mobile home just south of Coral Reef Drive (she had stayed with us during the storm), and it took us about 4 hours to make that trip. We found her trailer flipped over onto another one two lots down. Both trailers were a mangled mess about 4 feet high.

Yeah, records show the northern eyewall of Andrew took a path across right across that area around SW 152 St. We had about 1/2 of the house left, and stayed there for a week after the storm, before we could find a place to stay.
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Old 06-04-2016, 07:36 AM
 
8,045 posts, read 6,106,762 times
Reputation: 2734
Quote:
Originally Posted by North_Pinellas_Guy View Post
I have read about it and heard many great things. I think this is the approach we will use, when we finally get to protecting our insanely cheap/lousy 1990's single pane windows. I honestly have no idea how they made it this long without sustaining damage, as there are no signs of them ever being protected.
We have never had strong winds here since your house was built. Lets go back in time some. Sept 1985 we had the Cat3 Elena that sat offshore in the middle grounds for 2 days. That gave us 50 to 60mph winds at most for us in Tampa. Then we had the no name storm in March 1993 that gave us gust to around 70 mph in Tampa and 100mph + on the Pasco coast. Then we had the two state crosssing stroms in Sept of 04 that both gave us winds to 70 mph. And that is it since i was born here in 1963.

Elena had stacked the grouper up on the high peaks in the middle grounds. For 2 months it was like we went back to the 1940's the way we caught so many grouper. 3000lbs in under 4 hours for weeks. It's no wonder the fish were wiped out in the late 80's offshore.
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Old 06-04-2016, 07:50 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
8,018 posts, read 5,042,519 times
Reputation: 9862
Quote:
Originally Posted by North_Pinellas_Guy View Post
I have read about it and heard many great things. I think this is the approach we will use, when we finally get to protecting our insanely cheap/lousy 1990's single pane windows. I honestly have no idea how they made it this long without sustaining damage, as there are no signs of them ever being protected.
It's been a long time since there was a hurricane in your neck of the woods, it's not at all uncommon to find no window protection on houses in such areas. People tend to think window protection is an unnecessary expense unless they've seen what can happen without it in the event of a hurricane. I can tell you it was a rare thing to see shutters or panels on windows in Dade County prior to hurricane Andrew, it had been many yrs since they had had a hurricane in that area, and people just didn't think window protection was needed, or they could just tape up windows ( total waste of time and no protection), or nail plywood over the windows if need be. We had shutters and panels, but it had taken me 4 yrs after we bought that house to convince my husband that we should spend the money to get them.

After hurricane Andrew people saw the light, and now you don't see many places there without window protection. It's the same way in Charlotte county, after hurricane Charley.

I agree, those storm screens look like they'd be a good product. We have impact windows in our current house, but I had thoughts of seeing if those screens could be installed inside our screened lanai. Not sure it would happen any time soon, it would be another 4 yr project convincing hubby we need them.
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Old 06-04-2016, 07:59 AM
 
3,214 posts, read 5,251,008 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lunetunelover View Post
One tip I learned living in another hurricane prone area - set your freezer on it's coldest setting a few days before the storm. Believe it or not, it will help keep the frozen food colder longer should the power go out.


Get ICE before the storm, if possible and if you have a place to store it.


Make sure you have a can opener that is NOT electric for those canned goods.
We found out the hard way-----don't store bags of ice in your freezer or refrigerator thinking it will help. It melts and water leaks out, without the evaporation fans working it fills the pan under the refrigerator/freezer, overflows, and ours ran down the wall into the condo below ours. They were not happy. Use coolers-most stores had a limit to 2 before the storm.

Also when you do have damage the cans of food may be rusted by the time allowed back to your home.(They had a mandatory curfew and asked you not to leave your shelter for a day or 2 after Jeanne)We did not use ours except for what we brought with us where we waited out the storm because of the rusty cans.

Our area sustained damage so free ice was available in parking lots with employees and volunteers handing them out. We must of been deemed pretty bad because the fire department brought out bags of ice almost every night until our area had electricity.

Publix stores should be up and running as soon as they can if not damaged because many now have huge generators and they have huge generators in semi trailers they can move to stores that are without electricity. At the time of the last storms my son and I worked at different stores that carried supplies. Eating out of cans got old so we ate a lot of chicken brought home from the grocery store instead of dirtying dishes and cooking on the grill every meal. Coolest thing happened where I work.....a sister store up in Ocala drove down with enough food for employees to eat at the store for 2 days. WTG Ocala!

If we have storms now even if the storm takes all the road signs down, the exits are marked on the roads in paint.After Jeanne you had to guess if it was the right one if not used to the area. In town the National Guard will come in and help direct traffic etc. They painted street names in the intersections so it was easier to get around. If out on the roads-almost all intersections are 4 way stops till the lights are replaced. Be careful. The night after the hurricane I was in the store past curfew and got stopped. It was actually scary out there. You have never seen a town in such complete darkness....no house lights, street lights, commercial signs lighting up a street.

We have a tent in case our house is deemed unsafe so we can stay on the property and guard against looters. We have a portable generator. People learned the hard way in 2004 about generators. Have long heavy duty electric cords made specifically for running heavy machines to reach your refrigerator, well pump, etc.(I think ours cost about $100 each)

Do not use generators inside house or garage or place near your open windows or too close to your neighbors windows because of the fumes. Also lock them down. Lots of stolen generators in 2004. Now is the time to take them in to be cleaned and checked out by a professional to make sure they are safe to use.

Just another reminder-don't use your charcoal grill in the house or garage either......it probably will rain the day after winds are gone so just use an umbrella or get wet instead of endangering your family. The day after a storm We usually cook all the meat we had in the freezer because it is thawed but still safe to eat. During hurricane season we do not fill the freezers with meat. We tend to buy enough for each week instead of for months at a time.

Do not use candles or lanterns with fire during the storm, i they get knocked over or forgotten while you sleep, they can cause a fire and there is no fire or rescue once the winds hit 45-50 mph till after the storm.

One other thing if your family is scattered throughout the state.....have a relative's number up North as a place to call if they cannot reach you. Our cells were out(either no service or too busy to get through because it became emergency tower for police, fire, etc.) Even though we had found an old rotary dial phone to use(no phones that plug in to electric outlet work) we did not have phones because it completely tore out the box where the phone service came into the house. Our son ended up driving over to check on us and had to beg to be let into the area off I-95.

Also remember banks will not be open so have cash to use after the storm. Debits and credit machines may not work in stores.

Stay home.....do not go driving through areas and taking pictures of the damage unless you are going to help not gawk.
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