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Old 06-09-2016, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee Area of WI
1,886 posts, read 1,283,917 times
Reputation: 1988

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
Thanks... just some tips from a storm-worn veteran here. Been in Florida for 40 years and seen a number of storms. Mostly tropical storms, thank goodness. And direct impact by three hurricanes, Andrew (1992) Katrina and Wilma (both in 2005).
40 years! Wow! You certainly have seen some stuff lady
Thank you for all your good advice on these forums
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Old 06-10-2016, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Finally the house is done and we are in Port St. Lucie!
3,488 posts, read 2,047,402 times
Reputation: 9734
This really should be a sticky. Very important and helpful information here.

Anyone have any Moderators that they know and can ask for this? I would but I am still learning the quirks of the forum

Or is this not a good thing? I just fear that it will go off the first page.
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Old 06-13-2016, 01:06 AM
 
Location: North of South, South of North
8,706 posts, read 8,777,418 times
Reputation: 5072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robino1 View Post
This really should be a sticky. Very important and helpful information here.

Anyone have any Moderators that they know and can ask for this? I would but I am still learning the quirks of the forum

Or is this not a good thing? I just fear that it will go off the first page.
I made it a sticky, but we are only allowed to have two at a time.....so it may get unstuck at some point. It would be good to have it stuck for the next several months, though.
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Old 06-13-2016, 05:28 AM
 
Location: Finally the house is done and we are in Port St. Lucie!
3,488 posts, read 2,047,402 times
Reputation: 9734
Quote:
Originally Posted by North_Pinellas_Guy View Post
I made it a sticky, but we are only allowed to have two at a time.....so it may get unstuck at some point. It would be good to have it stuck for the next several months, though.
A couple of months works.

Thanks
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Old 06-13-2016, 06:36 AM
 
3,551 posts, read 6,174,470 times
Reputation: 3100
Was reading through this and I think we failed to mention one thing for retired newbies or people with some type of debilitating illness, or imminent childbirth :-) Each county usually evacuates people who need help first. There is also usually a medical shelter set up. I believe they even transport your hospital bed and IVs etc. Usually anyone needing help is asked to register with the county to make sure they get the assistance . So if you have a medical reason for special help talk to your county now and let them know.

If you live on the island and there is a mandatory evacuation and refuse to leave they will ask for your name and next of kin just in case. Just know that usually the causeway closes at 45-50 mph winds. Fire and rescue do not leave the station once the winds hit 45- 50 either. That said when the medical shelter in Melbourne was damaged in one of the storms our heroes came out and evacuated all the shelter guests to a different shelter a few miles away in the winds.

I saw something about running out of meds. Don't worry. You will know the storm is coming. You don't have to hunker in 3 days before it gets here. Stores try to stay open till day before at least. For Jeanne our pharmacist was in the store till about 6 hours before the storm reached us. Also the day or 2 after you will be able to go to hospital pharmacy and they can usually get you the meds or just bring the original bottle to any pharmacy showing you are due a refill that day. They may just give you enough for a day or 2 to get you through till you can get them at your regular pharmacy.

Also if you work certain jobs you might not be allowed to leave the area and might have to be on duty during the storm-nurses, doctors, hospital staff, police, fire, rescue, city management, city maintenance crews, utility workers, and even some of the tech firms in town have crews that stay on site or 24 hour call to keep the buildings safe. You will want to figure out where you want your family to be. Not all allows you to brin them to work with you.
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Old 06-18-2016, 08:00 AM
 
1,187 posts, read 592,078 times
Reputation: 1227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rabflmom View Post
Our utilities were buried in one neighborhood, but when a minimal hurricane came through in 1995(Erin , I think) , our electricity went out shortly after the first gusts and stayed off for a week. Feeder lines were down and circuit breakers blew. Heard them blow during the night. 10 inches of rain in 4 hours the next morning caused flooding, but neighborhoods are not priority. First to get electricity back were hospitals, police stations, gas stations and businesses and then neighborhoods. Some people that complain about the little strip malls and gas stations on every corner might just be saying their thanks after a storm.
FPL was pretty good at restoring power after Wilma, by then they had plenty of practice. The biggest issue were the pumping stations losing power after Jeanne(which lasted days not hours), water had to be shut off for several days so as not to contaminate the drinking supply.
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Old 06-18-2016, 12:54 PM
 
3,551 posts, read 6,174,470 times
Reputation: 3100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunbiz1 View Post
FPL was pretty good at restoring power after Wilma, by then they had plenty of practice. The biggest issue were the pumping stations losing power after Jeanne(which lasted days not hours), water had to be shut off for several days so as not to contaminate the drinking supply.
Jeanne was our storm that took so long to get power back in South Brevard. Most people depend on electricity to pump water from their wells, so without water and electricity for a week or more in some areas. Good time to check home owners insurance to see how long they will pay for you to stay somewhere else.
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Old 06-18-2016, 02:54 PM
 
1,187 posts, read 592,078 times
Reputation: 1227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rabflmom View Post
Jeanne was our storm that took so long to get power back in South Brevard. Most people depend on electricity to pump water from their wells, so without water and electricity for a week or more in some areas. Good time to check home owners insurance to see how long they will pay for you to stay somewhere else.
Unless you happen to be in the eyewall of a Charlie or Andrew, it's the aftermath of a storm that causes more headaches than going through it.

I was unfortunate to be without a generator, and had an electric stove. The grill in the backyard saw plenty of action.

And there's trying to drive without any stop signs or traffic control devices, when you have to get to work.
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Old 06-18-2016, 05:46 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,660 posts, read 6,959,908 times
Reputation: 13962
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunbiz1 View Post
Unless you happen to be in the eyewall of a Charlie or Andrew, it's the aftermath of a storm that causes more headaches than going through it.

I was unfortunate to be without a generator, and had an electric stove. The grill in the backyard saw plenty of action.

And there's trying to drive without any stop signs or traffic control devices, when you have to get to work.

After Hurricane Andrew there were police officers, and volunteers at major intersections in Miami directing traffic. They did a yeoman's job at what had to be a hot, exhausting and stressful setting, and everyone I know was so grateful for their help. And it seemed to me that at least for some period of time, drivers complied with those traffic signals, and were more considerate of each other than I had ever seen either before or after that.

But I lost count of how many loop-de-loops I did around to avoid having to make left hand turns at major intersections when those signals were out.
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Old 06-18-2016, 06:15 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,660 posts, read 6,959,908 times
Reputation: 13962
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rabflmom View Post
Was reading through this and I think we failed to mention one thing for retired newbies or people with some type of debilitating illness, or imminent childbirth :-) Each county usually evacuates people who need help first. There is also usually a medical shelter set up. I believe they even transport your hospital bed and IVs etc. Usually anyone needing help is asked to register with the county to make sure they get the assistance . So if you have a medical reason for special help talk to your county now and let them know.

If you live on the island and there is a mandatory evacuation and refuse to leave they will ask for your name and next of kin just in case. Just know that usually the causeway closes at 45-50 mph winds. Fire and rescue do not leave the station once the winds hit 45- 50 either. That said when the medical shelter in Melbourne was damaged in one of the storms our heroes came out and evacuated all the shelter guests to a different shelter a few miles away in the winds.

I saw something about running out of meds. Don't worry. You will know the storm is coming. You don't have to hunker in 3 days before it gets here. Stores try to stay open till day before at least. For Jeanne our pharmacist was in the store till about 6 hours before the storm reached us. Also the day or 2 after you will be able to go to hospital pharmacy and they can usually get you the meds or just bring the original bottle to any pharmacy showing you are due a refill that day. They may just give you enough for a day or 2 to get you through till you can get them at your regular pharmacy.

Also if you work certain jobs you might not be allowed to leave the area and might have to be on duty during the storm-nurses, doctors, hospital staff, police, fire, rescue, city management, city maintenance crews, utility workers, and even some of the tech firms in town have crews that stay on site or 24 hour call to keep the buildings safe. You will want to figure out where you want your family to be. Not all allows you to brin them to work with you.
As I think I mentioned in my response to the OP, instructions for residents with special needs during a hurricane warning in the event they need to be evacuated or moved to a medical facility can be found by contacting the Emergency Management service for the county of residence. These numbers, as well as information needed to make arrangements for those with special needs can be found on each county's website, under their management. From the instructions I have read on various county websites, one needs to contact the emergency management folks, likely fill out and submit a form stating one's situation and special needs. The county will contact the person, assess his/her needs, and go from there. What they can do for each person is based on his/her needs (not necessarily preferences), and resources/facilities available to the county during the emergency.

If one works at a job considered essential during a hurricane ( such as the jobs you mentioned), each employer will have a written emergency plan covering hurricane warnings and hurricanes, this spells out the duties before, during and after the storm, employee coverage, and specific employees will be assigned for this coverage (when I worked in Miami hospitals the hurricane coverage was on a voluntary basis, or assigned yearly on a rotating basis).
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