U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Florida
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-02-2016, 04:56 PM
 
Location: USA's #1 MSA 4 Years Running
8,569 posts, read 7,306,320 times
Reputation: 4885

Advertisements

With the possibility of a tropical system developing and hitting the state Monday/Tuesday, it is a good time to discuss storm prep.

We have yet to go through any major tropical system, since we arrived in 2012. What do y'all do in prep for these tropical systems and what does your kit contain.
__________________
My mod posts will be bolded in red.

The Rules ~ Infractions & Deletions ~ Who's the moderator? ~ FAQ ~ Personal Attacks ~ Trolling ~ Copyrighted Material

Last edited by The Villages Guy; 06-03-2016 at 12:22 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-02-2016, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Florida
2,995 posts, read 1,372,356 times
Reputation: 4269
great topic !

#1 : Check out your Insurance Policies :
A) HomeOwners , WindStorm & if You are covered by Flood Insurance as well.
B) Renters , please get some sort of "Renter's" Insurance it's not that expensive and your Car Insurance Company may cover you as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2016, 05:05 AM
 
Location: South Florida
4,280 posts, read 3,998,190 times
Reputation: 4073
i usually start a little stock pile of water, dry goods, and make sure my flashlights have batteries this time of year so I don't have to battle the crowds when a storm is coming.(including what was posted above)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2016, 06:01 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
8,018 posts, read 5,042,519 times
Reputation: 9862
Quote:
Originally Posted by North_Pinellas_Guy View Post
With the possibility of a tropical system developing and hitting the state Monday/Tuesday, it is a good time to discuss storm prep.

We have yet to go through any major tropical system, since we arrived in 2012. What do y'all do in prep for these tropical systems and what does your kit contain.
Here are a couple links on the topic of hurricane preparedness. We've always gotten most of the items in June, or well before any tropical system warning or watch, supplies are plentiful then and there are no lines, no waiting, and the items are useful even if there are no storms. These include nonperishable food items, disposable paper goods, plastic containers and garbage bags, pharmaceuticals as needed, batteries, flashlights and lantern, matches, pet food.. We also make sure the cars are gassed up all the time during hurricane season, and we obtain the cash we think we might need well in advance. These are expenses but can be obtained a few items at a time if started soon enough well in advance of any tropical warning.

The above information is available on any hurricane planning guide, but here are a few tips from some hurricane-worn veterans here. We've been here since the mid-70s and have gone through a number of hurricanes (Andrew was the worst, the others mostly inconvenient, for us, anyway).

Regarding the nonperishable food, get what you like and will eat, that has a minimum of preparation. You don't have much appetite under post hurricane conditions, and having to eat can after can of stuff you don't really like much (for me that was tuna, those little canned sausage links) will make you never want to see them again when its all over. This is the time for comfort food if there ever was time. Peanut butter is your friend!

Have lots and lots of water and other drinks on hand. With no power, no AC and working under those conditions makes one thirsty and dehydration can be a problem. I recall wanting more to drink than eat, and think we all had at least a bit of dehydration, which made us feel lousy. Bottled water is fine, but we saved clean gallon containers, bought other containers which we filled with tap water before a storm. Some of those you can freeze-they will keep your freezer cooler longer when the power is out, and they can serve to keep items in coolers cool, when they thaw you can drink the water. We also found canned and boxed juices, gatorade very helpful. We also have a 20 gallon insulated drink container with a faucet we fill with water and lots of ice, that has gone a long way and provided lots of quick drinks of water following storms.

We put items such as batteries, matches in large plastic containers so they are protected and are all together.

They suggest filling bathtubs with water, for use in flushing toilets, dishwashing and cleaning, in the event you aren't getting running water. Lots of wipies-both for personal use, and cleaning are very helpful too. I remember using that bathtub full of water down to the last drop in Miami after Hurricane Andrew.

Just a few ideas.

Hurricane Safety Checklists National Hurricane Survival Initiative

Hurricane Preparedness - Be Ready
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2016, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Port Charlotte
3,807 posts, read 3,670,840 times
Reputation: 3169
We have a generator, so we can keep the refrigerator cool. So several cans of gas with stabil, non-perishable foods, water, a propane grill is a good idea, same sort of stuff everyone else has mentioned. If we have up to a Class 2 storm, will probably ride it out. Above that, we will secure the home and go visit kinfolk well away from the storm.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2016, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Paradise
2,382 posts, read 1,439,454 times
Reputation: 3731
One tip I learned living in another hurricane prone area - set your freezer on it's coldest setting a few days before the storm. Believe it or not, it will help keep the frozen food colder longer should the power go out.


Get ICE before the storm, if possible and if you have a place to store it.


Make sure you have a can opener that is NOT electric for those canned goods.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2016, 12:20 PM
 
Location: USA's #1 MSA 4 Years Running
8,569 posts, read 7,306,320 times
Reputation: 4885
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobdreamz View Post
great topic !

#1 : Check out your Insurance Policies :
A) HomeOwners , WindStorm & if You are covered by Flood Insurance as well.
B) Renters , please get some sort of "Renter's" Insurance it's not that expensive and your Car Insurance Company may cover you as well.
Great points.

Our son, who currently has flood insurance, is considering whether or not to keep it. He lives close to the Anclote waterway, so of course we told him it is a no brainier to keep it. A small <$400 cost per year is a wonderful peace of mind.
__________________
My mod posts will be bolded in red.

The Rules ~ Infractions & Deletions ~ Who's the moderator? ~ FAQ ~ Personal Attacks ~ Trolling ~ Copyrighted Material
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2016, 12:34 PM
 
Location: USA's #1 MSA 4 Years Running
8,569 posts, read 7,306,320 times
Reputation: 4885
Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
Here are a couple links on the topic of hurricane preparedness. We've always gotten most of the items in June, or well before any tropical system warning or watch, supplies are plentiful then and there are no lines, no waiting, and the items are useful even if there are no storms. These include nonperishable food items, disposable paper goods, plastic containers and garbage bags, pharmaceuticals as needed, batteries, flashlights and lantern, matches, pet food.. We also make sure the cars are gassed up all the time during hurricane season, and we obtain the cash we think we might need well in advance. These are expenses but can be obtained a few items at a time if started soon enough well in advance of any tropical warning.

The above information is available on any hurricane planning guide, but here are a few tips from some hurricane-worn veterans here. We've been here since the mid-70s and have gone through a number of hurricanes (Andrew was the worst, the others mostly inconvenient, for us, anyway).

Regarding the nonperishable food, get what you like and will eat, that has a minimum of preparation. You don't have much appetite under post hurricane conditions, and having to eat can after can of stuff you don't really like much (for me that was tuna, those little canned sausage links) will make you never want to see them again when its all over. This is the time for comfort food if there ever was time. Peanut butter is your friend!

Have lots and lots of water and other drinks on hand. With no power, no AC and working under those conditions makes one thirsty and dehydration can be a problem. I recall wanting more to drink than eat, and think we all had at least a bit of dehydration, which made us feel lousy. Bottled water is fine, but we saved clean gallon containers, bought other containers which we filled with tap water before a storm. Some of those you can freeze-they will keep your freezer cooler longer when the power is out, and they can serve to keep items in coolers cool, when they thaw you can drink the water. We also found canned and boxed juices, gatorade very helpful. We also have a 20 gallon insulated drink container with a faucet we fill with water and lots of ice, that has gone a long way and provided lots of quick drinks of water following storms.

We put items such as batteries, matches in large plastic containers so they are protected and are all together.

They suggest filling bathtubs with water, for use in flushing toilets, dishwashing and cleaning, in the event you aren't getting running water. Lots of wipies-both for personal use, and cleaning are very helpful too. I remember using that bathtub full of water down to the last drop in Miami after Hurricane Andrew.

Just a few ideas.

Hurricane Safety Checklists National Hurricane Survival Initiative

Hurricane Preparedness - Be Ready

Excellent info, Travelassie.

Here are a few issues I know we need to reconcile:

1) Because of serious health issues, I am on multiple medications. Two of them are ones I cannot get until I am two days from running out. This could be a huge issue, if the timing is bad.mYhere is no way to get those two stocked up.

2) We always have extra batteries, but have been having a problem with them leaking when not in use.

3) Because of my health issues, evacuating is pretty much not a possibility. I need to stay horizontal as much as possible. 99% of the day.

4) We have a bedroom window air conditioner, so we do not have to AC the entire house that cool at night. Wondering how I would run a power cable to it, if we were to purchase a portable propane generator. The AC power cord is indoors, but the generator would be outside.

5) Speaking of portable generators, how do people prevent them from being stolen in times of need? Seems like an easy crime of opportunity.
__________________
My mod posts will be bolded in red.

The Rules ~ Infractions & Deletions ~ Who's the moderator? ~ FAQ ~ Personal Attacks ~ Trolling ~ Copyrighted Material
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2016, 02:44 PM
Status: "Wandering Soul" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
2,962 posts, read 4,988,947 times
Reputation: 4566
30+ year resident. I don't even bat an eye unless it's nearing a cat 3 and then I may just fill the tubs. Have yet to evacuate, it's harder to get back in than get out. Most of the time they don't let you back in to even assess damage and you're stuck floundering between hotels and trying again and again. . Even for Wilma which was cat 5 then 4 on impact I stuck around.

The news will try and scare you and hype everyone up. Everything is "get your supplies now , stock up for 2 weeks" etc etc. you see mass chaos 9 days out where people are fighting over and friggin can of soup. It's a lost cause half the time. Wait till about 3 days before. You'll have a better idea where impact is. Even then it's not certain. Charlie changed course 2 hours before impact and destroyed Port Charlotte. Was suppose to hit Tampa area. I mostly take anything in from the porch, fill
The tubs and have some water handy. The stores won't be down for weeks so food will be available sooner than you think. If yore lucky enough to be on the same switch board as a shelter you'll have power quick. I've never gone longer than 2 days.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2016, 04:31 PM
 
Location: South Florida
4,280 posts, read 3,998,190 times
Reputation: 4073
If a storm is definitely headed your way, do all of your laundry..
Sounds silly but when the power goes out you'll be glad you did.
Generator or not

During Wilma most of our neighbors lost power for 3 weeks.
I felt kind of guilty that ours was only out a few days

Prepare as though you're going camping.
Thats what it's like after a bad hit....in that there were curfews and you couldn't go out, and you have to be ready for possible boredom.
Cards, games, and books will be very appreciated.
And s'mores via candles.

Last edited by cfbs2691; 06-03-2016 at 04:40 PM.. Reason: Add
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2013 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Florida

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top