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Old 07-31-2008, 01:10 AM
 
7 posts, read 7,560 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Staykay View Post
I am a native Floridian, and I am disgusted with the way my state has been ruined. We have become the nation's old folks home! Retirees come down here and clog traffic with their slow driving, fill up resturants all day long (because they don't have anything else to do), and refuse to vote for necessary taxes for schools because their grandkids live in another state!

There are cities in Florida (Naples, St. Petersburg, Lakeland, etc.) where it looks like that movie Cocoon everywhere you go!

I know growing old is part of life, and older people have earned the support/aide of the young --but why can't it be where they came from??!! It's not right to give all the strength of your working years in one state, then move somewhere else and say to the people there, "Take care of me."

I know that they bring their retirement money with them, but it runs out! Everybody knows that many people outlive their provision for old age --and then what? Are they going to go back to New York and run up huge medical bills at the county hospitals that they can't pay? No, they become a burden to the people of Florida.

I believe very much in honoring the elderly. Every year as my mother (and I) grow older, I treasure her more and more. But my mom was born and worked all her life in Florida. She deserves to bask in our sunshine now.

There should be interstate immigration limits on how many elderly people can move here, just like the limits we have on people who wash up on our beaches and just keep coming, and coming, and coming.

Thinking of retiring to Florida? Don't. Enough is enough!
i agree 110%

 
Old 07-31-2008, 05:57 AM
 
464 posts, read 1,011,286 times
Reputation: 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
I was about to say some of what you have: everyone with rare exception is on medicare, it isn't a free program as our young friend might think and it covers only part of our medical needs. She seems to think most of us will outlive our money, some yes, many no; does she have parents or grandparents? I have probably never seen a thread so outrageous in my life...I think her age shows when she refers to hyperinflation: she hasn't lived like some of us have through many bouts with inflation. It does revert itself. NOw, to her, I hope you don't have to listen to people like you when you reach 65,70 or older!!!! BTW, I do not live in Florida, nor do any of our retired friends. We live in AR, some in NM, some in Calif, Ill, Va, etc. Make sure, when you retire you don't stay in Florida, God forbid, those younger than you may have to pay taxes for some of your benefits.....
I think the OP will change her mind about old folks in florida when she hits 60 something and still remains in Florida.
 
Old 07-31-2008, 06:00 AM
 
Location: Central Fl
2,900 posts, read 6,363,470 times
Reputation: 2576
This thread is close to being closed.
It is inflammatory in nature, and not helpful in any way.

The only reason I am not closing it is because I will soon be one of these "old people" who will move to Florida, and I see an ethical conflict of interest if I closed this thread.

At the risk of sounding pompous, I know that my wife and I will both be more of an asset then a liability to our new Florida community on every level.

I have already given an infraction and warning to one post here......this subject is sure bringing out the unfriendly side of some Floridians. Thankfully, I have not run into any of these bigoted people yet in my experiences there so far.

I am not an expert on Florida history, but if I remember my grade school history, if you want to truthfully call yourself a "native Floridian", you need to be a descendant of one of the original nine Native American tribes of Florida. If you are not, you are no different then me, you just got there first. You have no more "rights" to Florida then I have. Oh, and by the way, last time I checked, we were all Americans and have the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. And I'll exercise that right paying my own way, thank you.

Florida Indian Tribes and Languages

It seems to me if one made a list of those who may be hurting Florida, "old retirees" would not be at the top of the list.

Frank D.
 
Old 07-31-2008, 07:06 AM
 
Location: where my heart is
5,643 posts, read 3,933,452 times
Reputation: 1661
Default Economically there is a point

Quote:
Originally Posted by faithfulFrank View Post
This thread is close to being closed.
It is inflammatory in nature, and not helpful in any way.

The only reason I am not closing it is because I will soon be one of these "old people" who will move to Florida, and I see an ethical conflict of interest if I closed this thread.

At the risk of sounding pompous, I know that my wife and I will both be more of an asset then a liability to our new Florida community on every level.

I have already given an infraction and warning to one post here......this subject is sure bringing out the unfriendly side of some Floridians. Thankfully, I have not run into any of these bigoted people yet in my experiences there so far.

I am not an expert on Florida history, but if I remember my grade school history, if you want to truthfully call yourself a "native Floridian", you need to be a descendant of one of the original nine Native American tribes of Florida. If you are not, you are no different then me, you just got there first. You have no more "rights" to Florida then I have. Oh, and by the way, last time I checked, we were all Americans and have the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. And I'll exercise that right paying my own way, thank you.

Florida Indian Tribes and Languages

It seems to me if one made a list of those who may be hurting Florida, "old retirees" would not be at the top of the list.

Frank D.
Way back when, we used to live in Queens. The area was mostly small two bedroom attached houses. When we first moved in, there were a number of young families, but they sold their homes as their families grew. Eventually, there were few families and the area was mostly seniors. The entire structure of the neighboorhood changed.

The local McD's closed down. How often do seniors eat Happy Meals? Even Dunkin Donuts closed. They were replaced by either medical professionals, or NOTHING. There was a nice Mom and Pop shoe store down the street. They closed too. Seniors don't need to be buying Nikes or back to school shoes constantly.

Crime also increased. The neighorhood became a target because I guess the word was out that there were a lot of elderly people, mostly women alone, who could not defend themselves and would be an easy target. Some of the neighbors on my street were so afraid that they came to my husband (early 30s then) and asked if he would organize a citizens patrol with some of the "younger" men.

My point in all this is that an area needs young families to survive economically. Seniors simply are not in need of all the goods and services that young couples with children do. The crime factor simply speaks for itself.

There is a rational point to the OP's view. I saw this happen myself more than 30 years ago.
 
Old 07-31-2008, 07:20 AM
 
Location: Hernando County, FL
8,489 posts, read 10,822,063 times
Reputation: 5397
Quote:
Originally Posted by TANaples View Post
Way back when, we used to live in Queens. The area was mostly small two bedroom attached houses. When we first moved in, there were a number of young families, but they sold their homes as their families grew. Eventually, there were few families and the area was mostly seniors. The entire structure of the neighboorhood changed.

The local McD's closed down. How often do seniors eat Happy Meals? Even Dunkin Donuts closed. They were replaced by either medical professionals, or NOTHING. There was a nice Mom and Pop shoe store down the street. They closed too. Seniors don't need to be buying Nikes or back to school shoes constantly.

Crime also increased. The neighorhood became a target because I guess the word was out that there were a lot of elderly people, mostly women alone, who could not defend themselves and would be an easy target. Some of the neighbors on my street were so afraid that they came to my husband (early 30s then) and asked if he would organize a citizens patrol with some of the "younger" men.

My point in all this is that an area needs young families to survive economically. Seniors simply are not in need of all the goods and services that young couples with children do. The crime factor simply speaks for itself.

There is a rational point to the OP's view. I saw this happen myself more than 30 years ago.
I think it just had more to do with that paricular neigborhood going downhill than the age being a factor.

There were many neighborhoods in NY that went through the same changes but not because of a more elderly population.

Much of the elderly population in Florida has a decent disposable income with which to help the economy.
 
Old 07-31-2008, 07:38 AM
 
384 posts, read 1,032,443 times
Reputation: 117
I saw a billboard in Alabama for a retirement village that read
"Florida's Full"
 
Old 07-31-2008, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Central Fl
2,900 posts, read 6,363,470 times
Reputation: 2576
Quote:
Originally Posted by TANaples View Post
My point in all this is that an area needs young families to survive economically. Seniors simply are not in need of all the goods and services that young couples with children do.
Perhaps, but you could not prove that driving through The Villages... economically, it is VERY healthy.

There may be some valid points in the original post, but the whole tone of it was/is caustic, and points to a slippery slope for sure. What group would be targeted next? Reminds one a bit like 1940's Germany, or something like Margaret Sanger's viewpoints. Scary.

Frank D.
 
Old 07-31-2008, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
48,438 posts, read 39,541,284 times
Reputation: 20353
Quote:
Originally Posted by faithfulFrank View Post
Perhaps, but you could not prove that driving through The Villages... economically, it is VERY healthy.

There may be some valid points in the original post, but the whole tone of it was/is caustic, and points to a slippery slope for sure. What group would be targeted next? Reminds one a bit like 1940's Germany, or something like Margaret Sanger's viewpoints. Scary.

Frank D.
our son in law has a swimming pool maintainance business in Orlando, believe me, many of his clients are seniors. They have the money, don't want to do the work or can't and are glad to hire him or his company.

yes, areas have to attract young families, but to suggest seniors leave is just what you are saying, Germany in the 30s and 40s???? What next?/

nita

Nita
 
Old 07-31-2008, 09:57 AM
 
Location: NY & Fl
10,871 posts, read 7,358,771 times
Reputation: 8746

America isn't sending us.....we're coming voluntarily
 
Old 07-31-2008, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Gary, WV & Springfield, ME
5,826 posts, read 6,000,380 times
Reputation: 17127
Knock knock. 'Scuze me. Coming through, coming through.

I spent my working years in FL. 29 years of my sweat are there. And the very first chance I got, I went north - WAYYYY North. But not just me. Many working-age people are finding the sunshine in FL is a bit over-rated and in short order, they too, leave. So yeah, it could look as though only the seniors are moving to FL and are taking over. But that's a very one-sided view. The beaches are still inhabited by young, beautiful bodies with a few not so perfect ones. The little kids are there with their pails and shovels and watchful eyes when they venture into the water.

You'll see the traffic cops are younger and more fit than previous years. That's because Florida law enforcement appeals to those who are weary of directing traffic around accidents that involve them standing on sheets of ice that used to be a road and dodging other vehicle that can't stop any better than the mangled mess he's got to document. Yeah, some of the retirees are headed south but not all of them. Some are going north.

But not to worry, it will all get better and even out. It always does. There will always be young people in FL and there will always be retirement communities and seniors there, too. What happened to FL is the same thing that happened to New York. The population grew. It was popular. It was busy. It offered something for everyone. Florida is the growing state now. And it won't be a sea of retirees when all is said and done. But you can bet the influx will increase the value of your property and that's a good thing.
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