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Old 01-28-2007, 12:07 AM
 
Location: FL
1,318 posts, read 5,301,728 times
Reputation: 910

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MovingBack's post is an example of what Prichard was trying to say which I agree with - mold can be a serious problem DEPENDING ON THE PERSON -if you have allergies &/or sinus problems then of course it would probably be a problem! But for someone without these health concerns, you would just smell mold & clean it! The humidity in our house gets to 70% at times so who knows if there's mold - but we don't see it & don't smell it, so it must not be a problem even if it's there!
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Old 01-28-2007, 04:21 AM
 
Location: Central FL
1,683 posts, read 7,462,467 times
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mold can be a serious problem DEPENDING ON THE PERSON -if you have allergies &/or sinus problems then of course it would probably be a problem! But for someone without these health concerns, you would just smell mold & clean it!

Well, according to the previous post, if it's in EVERY house in Florida, it's microscopic and you can't see it or smell it, then everyone in Florida must impervious to mold or we would all be dead by now.

I'm just trying to get a handle on this objectively. We all know mold is not static. It is a living, growing organism. If it seeps through the foundation and gets into the walls of every home in Florida, wouldn't it stand to reason that after a few years every older home would be uninhabitable? I know when my previous home was built. It was a concrete block home on a concrete foundation. I saw the inside of these walls myself after the home was 24 years old. Surely mold would have been visible if it had been growing for 24 years?

Perhaps there is someone on this board who can help us. Maybe today I will call my building inspector friend....this is a real conundrum.
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Old 01-28-2007, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Miami
6,853 posts, read 19,269,333 times
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My house was built in 1969, cinder block home, no mold, just on the patio and front porch where the water sits from rain.
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Old 01-28-2007, 08:45 AM
 
232 posts, read 800,588 times
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Tallrick you suggested not to use sheetrock in your homes, so what materials do you use? What type of homes do you build? We are relocating this spring/summer and are probably going to build.
pianogal your friend the inspector how do you go about getting one? If we build do you recommend hiring one while home is being built? If we manage to find a home already build I quess it would be wise to get inspected BEFORE we buy huh? Thanks...Do they charge much to inspect? Thanks guys
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Old 01-28-2007, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Lakeland, FL
523 posts, read 2,594,221 times
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I have lived in Florida for 40 yrs never had mold problem. If a home is not built right and water gets in mold will develop. anywhere in USA this will happen. I know of one such builder who didnot coat the outside of home and water was coming in during storms. But that is rare.
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Old 01-28-2007, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Central FL
1,683 posts, read 7,462,467 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shedav View Post
Tallrick you suggested not to use sheetrock in your homes, so what materials do you use? What type of homes do you build? We are relocating this spring/summer and are probably going to build.
pianogal your friend the inspector how do you go about getting one? If we build do you recommend hiring one while home is being built? If we manage to find a home already build I quess it would be wise to get inspected BEFORE we buy huh? Thanks...Do they charge much to inspect? Thanks guys


Absolutely, get an inspector. We used a personal friend who is a builder - but was not building our home. If you buy a resale home - you still need a home inspector. If you were in Orlando, I would give you the name of the guy that inspected our old home before we sold it. He was extremely thorough. This is a HUGE investment so be sure you get these bases covered. I couldn't tell you the charge because our friend didn't charge us. I think the inspector's charge for the resale home was $500.00. That included the original inspection and then a followup after the recommended work had been done.
Of course, that's been a couple of years ago.

Perhaps someone else can address that?
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Old 01-28-2007, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Central FL
1,683 posts, read 7,462,467 times
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I spoke with two contractor/builders today and one friend who is an architectural engineer and builds hospitals all over the southeast (he is currently building one in Alabama and was home for the weekend.)

They all happened to be together having coffee in the fellowship hall at church this morning. Perfect timing, I thought so I approached them asked them the question about all homes in Florida having mold. Their concerted reply was absolutely not. If a home has mold on the walls or between the floors it's because the home was not properly built and/or sealed. They added that it's a common problem with newer homes in Florida because builders are throwing them up so fast - they often don't take the time to do the work properly.

Perhaps this will put some minds at ease...I know it did mine.
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Old 01-28-2007, 05:08 PM
 
Location: Central FL
1,683 posts, read 7,462,467 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tallrick View Post
This is why I never use wood or drywall in any of my construction. There's no mold here, anywhere . Mildew can form in the bathtub but that's easily cleaned away. Mold was less of a problem when homes were not to tight and drywall did not exist. It always amazed me how people build wood houses and then stucco them. Those cheap ugly Mc Mansions are always breeding grounds for toxic mold.
Tallrick...do you then build your home out of concrete block? I think that is the issue being discussed not wood. The claim is that water seeps through the concrete foundation therefore all homes in Florida have mold. I haven't seen any wooden homes stuccoed here - all the homes I've seen are poured concrete or concrete block.
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Old 01-28-2007, 06:03 PM
 
232 posts, read 800,588 times
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Thanks for the tip pianogal...I will definately have my home inspected during and after construction if we build and if not I sure will have it done before I buy an existing home!!!
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Old 01-28-2007, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 23,230,141 times
Reputation: 4895
I use all concrete, floors, roof and block for interior partitions. The inner portions of outside walls are styrofoam with expanded mesh and stucco. During Wilma I had a window break due to a tree falling on the house and took on an inch or more of water on the floor as it blew against the bedroom window and even with the door closed water flowed freely throughout the house. As I have no insurance it was up to me to clean up. The concrete walls, terazzo floor and steel furniture was not harmed, and there was no visible damage anywhere due to the storm. Last year I got a friend in the business to inspect for mold, and no spores were detected anywhere. On the other hand I knew of someone in Saga Bay ( I call it soggy bay) where the home was destroyed in hurricane Andrew, rebuilt and eventually developed a leak in the roof right over an interior wall. After the damage was discovered and the roof was repaired the wall was ripped out to replace damaged drywall. The entire wall was filled with black, powdery mold so toxic that one worker needed to be hospitalized. I have seen mold so often you wouldn't believe it. Most kitchens and bathrooms leak, and therefore have mold. In every central air conditioner you can find mold growing in the drainage tray. Mold needs an organic surface to grow on, so you never see it thrive on concrete, it can grow there if it's moist as it attracts dirt, but once dry the mold dies. You never see mold grow on bare concrete but I have seen it grow on painted concrete as latex paints contain organic matter. Metals are mold proof as well as glass, porcelain, etc. Pressure treated lumber is also mold-resistant so it's the only wood that should be in contact with concrete. Also be aware that oil-based paints should NEVER be used on concrete surfaces, humidity tends to bubble it off. One of the most common places to find mold is under carpeting, humidity from the concrete floor comes up to feed the growth. Avoid organic material and you will never, ever have to worry about mold!
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