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Old 03-03-2007, 10:19 AM
 
Location: So. Dak.
13,495 posts, read 34,077,718 times
Reputation: 15063

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There has been a lot of talk on here about what the housing market will do since there is such a build up of homes and high insurance costs and taxes. We're always taking into consideration the possibility of bad hurricane seasons. But if we consider the country in it's entirety, could the market come back sooner then expected? I'm thinking about things such as earthquakes on the West cost or winters in the midwest going back to the way they were in the 60s and the late 90s. It would surely have more people looking at Florida, Texas, etc. wouldn't it? There have to be people in the upper northeast who are checking out Fla. after their massive snowfalls. Some of the eastern parts of the midwest have had major factory lay-offs or closings. Is there really any way to predict what the Florida market will do since we don't know what will happen in the rest of the country?
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Old 03-03-2007, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Miami. Florida
942 posts, read 2,369,416 times
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Default just my thoughts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jammie View Post
There has been a lot of talk on here about what the housing market will do since there is such a build up of homes and high insurance costs and taxes. We're always taking into consideration the possibility of bad hurricane seasons. But if we consider the country in it's entirety, could the market come back sooner then expected? I'm thinking about things such as earthquakes on the West cost or winters in the midwest going back to the way they were in the 60s and the late 90s. It would surely have more people looking at Florida, Texas, etc. wouldn't it? There have to be people in the upper northeast who are checking out Fla. after their massive snowfalls. Some of the eastern parts of the midwest have had major factory lay-offs or closings. Is there really any way to predict what the Florida market will do since we don't know what will happen in the rest of the country?

Hi Jammie,

I don't think so, for a Northern (professional) to relocate to Florida, I am sure they would have to have a job in line first, if they are really looking at a sucessful relocating method. Look at the compariables in salaries for instance starting salarie for a project accountant in Chicago modestly about $24/hr comparare that to Miami-Dade that starting salary is about $10/hr for the same position. And it cost just as much for living here as it does there, variably.

I guess, if you could get the retired couple that can sell up north pay cash here for a middle class home and live off pension & retirement but I don't think that will be happening. And if people up north read our posts here in Florida they will never move.

And as for all the companies laying-off people up north moving here. I dont think we have a job market that can afford to employ these people and not have to live in a section 8 housing facility.
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Old 03-03-2007, 12:23 PM
 
2,141 posts, read 6,349,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by confused and relocating View Post
Hi Jammie,

I don't think so, for a Northern (professional) to relocate to Florida, I am sure they would have to have a job in line first, if they are really looking at a sucessful relocating method. Look at the compariables in salaries for instance starting salarie for a project accountant in Chicago modestly about $24/hr comparare that to Miami-Dade that starting salary is about $10/hr for the same position. And it cost just as much for living here as it does there, variably.

I guess, if you could get the retired couple that can sell up north pay cash here for a middle class home and live off pension & retirement but I don't think that will be happening. And if people up north read our posts here in Florida they will never move.

And as for all the companies laying-off people up north moving here. I dont think we have a job market that can afford to employ these people and not have to live in a section 8 housing facility.
This is a great point, Retired people would sell up north and come down here and buy a house cash, live off pensions and a C/D or two. But thats not the case anymore, If you come from a higher priced market you might do it, but most of the markets are lower then Florida now. In the south Florida area its just starting to show the job market weakness, And all the people that came here from other areas to work in the housing boom jobs are finding very little work now, If you can't pay the bills what do you do ? I don't think any big companies will move here anytime soon due to the price and lack of roadways, No jobs will keep the housing market on a down turn for a long time.
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Old 03-03-2007, 12:34 PM
 
Location: The Conterminous United States
22,554 posts, read 47,371,866 times
Reputation: 13400
I don't know. That was the reason that a LOT of the market went sky-high in the last few years.

You had a lot of retirees selling off up north and making huge profits. You have to remember, they bought there house for $20,000, sold it for $350,000 and thought nothing of buying a home in Florida for $250,000. A lot of them had union jobs and had no idea what the locals were being paid. They hadn't had a minimum wage job in 35 years! They tended to get snappy at the service people.

My dad had a union job up north for his entire career. He thinks it is hilarious to leave a waitress a quarter.

That may change in a few years, though. Those big pensions could be a thing of the past.
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Old 03-03-2007, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
14,505 posts, read 23,788,374 times
Reputation: 8838
Lightbulb Interesting-

Quote:
Originally Posted by firemed View Post
This is a great point, Retired people would sell up north and come down here and buy a house cash, live off pensions and a C/D or two. But thats not the case anymore, If you come from a higher priced market you might do it, but most of the markets are lower then Florida now. In the south Florida area its just starting to show the job market weakness, And all the people that came here from other areas to work in the housing boom jobs are finding very little work now, If you can't pay the bills what do you do ? I don't think any big companies will move here anytime soon due to the price and lack of roadways, No jobs will keep the housing market on a down turn for a long time.
Interesting point. The job market weakness is a BIG factor. Most people in their 30's and 40's are not moving to Florida, purchasing a beautiful home, and then so they can then say- Gee, I guess I'll find work now, only to be offered a paralegal job at 15.00 an hour. I just don't see it happening.

The employment issues down there are serious.

Last edited by dreamofmonterey; 03-03-2007 at 08:37 PM.. Reason: sp
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Old 03-03-2007, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
5,702 posts, read 22,267,244 times
Reputation: 2987
The job market in Florida is diverse in traits and pay depending on your location. Up here in the panhandle of Florida we depend on the military contracts; example the wage scale for aircraft mechanics start @ $20 per hour with benefits. We mave many admin or support positions that with benefits start @ $16 per hour.

Because or housing market is less expensive many that are relocating from other states are getting a good start. One big difference is that we have a large number of active/retired military that have firm and secure income.

Many military retired members (average age 45) are making over $65K per year between a second job full time job and military retirement. That directly affects in a positive way our economy.

With the summer approaching over 2,000 military will have to move to another base and about the same number will relocate to the area. This will also help our housing market because of the turnover of housing. I must note that the active military folks are getting an allowance of $1,300 (average) to live in this area plus their basic pay.

Again, this creates a very sound economy, with $140 million dollars dump into our area on a yearly basis.

For the ones willing to make a change in their lifes, our area can provide the financial heaven that you can't find in central/south Florida.

Last edited by sunrico90; 03-03-2007 at 08:02 PM.. Reason: edit
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