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Old 03-11-2007, 05:13 PM
 
Location: So. Dak.
13,495 posts, read 34,007,091 times
Reputation: 15058

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Quote:
Originally Posted by firemed View Post
Can we keep the trees and remove the developers?
That's funny! So my understanding of this is that the developers would HAVE to remove some trees in order to do their digging and building. Wouldn't that mean that they're only questioning whether to replant the same type of trees or go with palms?
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Old 03-12-2007, 06:34 AM
 
Location: a primitive state
9,840 posts, read 20,083,646 times
Reputation: 12286
The rules about replanting trees varies from county to county in Florida and even by municipality. Many have a system of points which are deducted for trees removed, i.e. large, old trees get more points and small trash trees get fewer.

Where this system is in place, the developer must replace trees with trees equaling the same amount of points.

The palm thing may be something different. They provide instant effect since they are transplanted from someplace else, but they do little to reduce carbon in the air or to provide shade. I don't think they are worth the same number of points as a canopy tree is, but please don't hold me to that.
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Old 03-12-2007, 07:33 AM
 
Location: New Smyrna Beach, Florida
131 posts, read 977,429 times
Reputation: 173
The palm trees native to Florida are the scrub palmetto, sabal palmetto and saw palmetto.

Not only do palm trees provide little shade, they also provide little in the way of wind protection. Pine trees do a slightly better job as a wind buffer, but still not nearly as good of a job as the oak.

I'm convinced that the majority of home destruction in Florida from the hurricanes would have been prevented if the native vegetation was left in place.

Personally, my favorite tree is the red mangrove. I even have a couple growing in a pot here on my desk.
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Old 03-03-2009, 12:07 PM
 
1 posts, read 4,407 times
Reputation: 10
Are there really places in Florida with no palm trees?
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Old 03-03-2009, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Niceville, FL
7,647 posts, read 16,027,047 times
Reputation: 7633
Once you get west of about Port St. Joe in the panhandle, the only native palm species is palmetto. It's something to do with soil conditions not being quite right for them to spread in their own, though they do well if planted after they've grown some.
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Old 03-03-2009, 02:56 PM
 
Location: where my heart is
5,642 posts, read 7,940,083 times
Reputation: 1661
Too many palm trees. I prefer the native trees. Anyway, for me with my Summer SAD, the native trees give more shade.
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Old 03-03-2009, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
2,638 posts, read 10,895,330 times
Reputation: 3542
I love palms, especially the native sabal palm. If you have never been walking in an undeveloped oak hammock and seen majestic sabal palms towering over the oaks, you are really missing real Florida imo. The berries of sabal palms are an important food for migratory birds and other wildlife. Everybody go out and plant some sabal palms! Now queen palms - those I can do without, although when I was a child I thought they were the most beautiful and snubbed my nose at the native sabal. Interesting how tastes change as we age, isn't it? Lately I am enamored with the types that shed their fronds and display those bright green crownshafts, like the foxtail palm. Those are just lovely. My all-time favorite is the Canary Island date palm when their cross-hatched trunks are colonized by ferns!
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Old 03-03-2009, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Alabama
980 posts, read 2,510,583 times
Reputation: 979
Keep the native trees. If you want to plant some Sabals, good. But I hate seeing these ugly, out of place tropical palms in North Florida when they are native to the Caribbean! Florida is not the Caribbean. Keep the tropical palms in South Florida. We'll keep our oaks and pines.
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Old 03-11-2009, 10:03 PM
 
Location: Floribama
14,739 posts, read 31,167,632 times
Reputation: 13491
Quote:
Originally Posted by FSUMike View Post
Keep the native trees. If you want to plant some Sabals, good. But I hate seeing these ugly, out of place tropical palms in North Florida when they are native to the Caribbean! Florida is not the Caribbean. Keep the tropical palms in South Florida. We'll keep our oaks and pines.
I'm seeing plenty of Date Palms planted in Pensacola, but I sometimes wonder how well they will do when we get those once in a lifetime single digit freezes. I prefer the native Sabal palms myself, and also the Needle palms. I am noticing that lumber and paper companies are starting to plant Longleaf pine, for years all they planted was Loblolly pine which isn't as good of a tree IMO. The problem with trying maintain Longleaf woodlands near residential areas is that they need fire, and many people in Florida will start complaining at the first sign of smoke.

This is some controlled burning in a young longleaf stand north of Pensacola.

http://i207.photobucket.com/albums/bb183/escambiaguy/tree pics/burn1.jpg (broken link)
http://i207.photobucket.com/albums/bb183/escambiaguy/tree pics/burn3.jpg (broken link)
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Old 03-12-2009, 08:40 AM
 
7,901 posts, read 8,875,321 times
Reputation: 3189
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jammie View Post
Sorry, but I feel the opposite. I absolutely love palm trees and they just give an area a totally tropical look. My preference for palms may be that they're exotic to me because of course, we don't have them anywhere in my area.
Live in Florida for a while and you won't care anymore.

We do not find them quaint or fascinating, they are just trees, and not particularly attractive ones, either.
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