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View Poll Results: Should the law be changed to mandate helmets?
Yes 40 55.56%
No 28 38.89%
Don't care 4 5.56%
Voters: 72. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-20-2007, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
5,702 posts, read 22,235,669 times
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I have friends that enjoy motorcycles and some have mentioned that helmets do save lifes, but they do like to ride without a helmet. What is your opinion?

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration conducted the first study, and it found that in the three years following Florida’s decision to repeal its mandatory helmet law in 2000 that there were 933 motorcyclists killed. The number of Florida motorcycle deaths increased 81 percent, an increase from the 515 bikers killed from 1997 to 1999.
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Old 03-20-2007, 05:05 PM
 
Location: Port St. Lucie and Okeechobee, FL
1,305 posts, read 5,018,767 times
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There were also more motorcyclists traveling more miles, so it's unclear whether the increase is due to the lack of helmets or to other factors. I would prefer to see a number based on miles traveled and number of bikers, not just a raw number. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is famous for releasing ambiguous numbers and spinning them the way they like.
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Old 03-20-2007, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
5,702 posts, read 22,235,669 times
Reputation: 2987
Hope this gives a bit of info:

THE TOPIC

FEBRUARY 2007

Motorcycle riding has become more popular in recent years, appealing to a new group of enthusiasts consisting of older and more affluent riders. Sales of all types of two-wheelers reached about 1,116,000 in 2005, a level not seen in about 30 years. At the same time motorcycle fatalities have also been climbing, reaching their highest level in 2005 since 1986. There has been a dramatic jump in the number of deaths among motorcycle riders age 40 and older in recent years.

Motorcycles are by their nature far less crashworthy than closed vehicles. They are also less visible to other drivers and pedestrians and less stable than four-wheel vehicles. Operating a motorcycle requires a different combination of physical and mental skills than those used in driving four-wheel vehicles. Motorcyclists and their passengers are more vulnerable to the hazards of weather and road conditions than drivers in closed vehicles.

Motorcycle insurance is widely available. As motorcycles became more popular, more insurers entered the market. Now, most of the top ten auto insurers offer motorcycle insurance, either as an endorsement to a personal automobile policy or as a separate policy, in most of the states in which they operate. Many have recently expanded into new states. For more information see Motorcycle Insurance in the Specialty Insurance section of the I.I.I. Web site.
KEY FACTS

* In 2005, 4,553 people died in motorcycle crashes, up 13.0 percent from 4,028 in 2004. The 13 percent increase was the largest since 1977.

* Motorcycle crash fatalities have increased for eight years in a row.

* There were 5.8 million motorcycles on U.S. roads in 2004, according to latest data available, compared with 133.3 million passenger cars. Motorcycles accounted for 2.4 percent of all registered motor vehicles and 0.3 percent of vehicle miles traveled in 2004.

* Some 88,000 motorcycles were involved in crashes in 2004.

* Motorcyclists were 34 times more likely than passenger car occupants to die in a crash in 2005, per vehicle mile traveled, and 8 times more likely to be injured.

* The fatality rate for motorcyclists was 4.8 times the fatality rate for passenger car occupants per registered vehicle in 2004.


FATALITIES AND INJURIES

Overall: According to U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA, http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov) (broken link), estimates, in 2005, 4,553 motorcyclists died in crashes, up 13.0 percent from 4,028 in 2004, marking the eighth consecutive year of higher motorcycle deaths. Motorcycle fatalities are at the highest level since 1986. From 1997, a historic low, to 2005, motorcycle fatalities are estimated to have risen 115 percent. In 2005, 87,000 motorcycle riders were injured in accidents, up 14.5 percent from 76,000 in 2004 and 53 percent from 57,000 in 1995.

In 2005 motorcyclists accounted for 10.5 percent of total traffic fatalities, 13.8 percent of occupant fatalities and 3.5 percent of all occupants injured. In 1997 motorcyclists accounted for only 5 percent of total traffic fatalities.

By Age: Older motorcycle riders, who account for an increasingly larger proportion of all motorcyclists, now account for about half of all motorcycle rider fatalities. NHTSA data show that in 2005, 47 percent of motorcycle riders killed in crashes were age 40 or over, compared with 25 percent ten years earlier. In contrast, fatalities among young motorcycle riders have declined in the past 10 years, relative to other age groups. In 2005 fatalities in the under 30-year old group dropped to 32 percent, from 50 percent in 1995. Fatalities among motorcyclists in the 30- to 39-year old group fell to 21 percent in 2005, from 26 percent ten years earlier.

By Driver Behavior:

Alcohol use: Motorcyclist operators have high incidences of alcohol use. NHTSA says that in 2005, 27 percent of motorcycle operators involved in fatal crashes had a blood-alcohol concentration (BAC) over 0.08 grams per deciliter (the national definition of drunk driving), compared with 22 percent of drivers of passenger cars, 21 percent of light truck drivers and 1 percent of large truck drivers in fatal crashes. These figures take into account fatally injured operators, passengers and/or pedestrians.

Of all fatally injured motorcycle operators, 27 percent had BAC levels of 0.08 or higher. Another 7 percent had lower alcohol levels (0.01 to 0.07 BAC.). Fatally injured motorcycle operators between the ages of 35 to 44 had the highest percentage of BACs 0.08 and above (39 percent), compared with those ages 45 to 49 (34 percent). Forty-one percent of the 1,878 fatally injured motorcycle operators who died in single-vehicle crashes in 2005 (for example, those in which the motorcycle crashed into a stationary object) had BAC levels of 0.08 or higher. On weekend nights, the proportion was higher: 61 percent of motorcycle operators who died in single-vehicle crashes had BACs of 0.08 or higher.

Speeding: In 2005, 34 percent of all motorcyclists involved in fatal crashes were speeding, compared with 26 percent for drivers of passenger cars and 25 percent for light truck drivers, according to NHTSA.

Licensing: Twenty-four percent of motorcycle operators who were involved in fatal crashes were riding without a valid license in 2005, compared with 12 percent of passenger vehicle drivers. NHTSA says that motorcycle operators were also 1.4 times more likely than passenger vehicle drivers to have a prior license suspension or revocation.
SAFETY ISSUES

The Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF, http://www.msf-usa.org) (broken link), sponsored by motorcycle manufacturers and distributors, works with NHTSA, state governments and other organizations to improve motorcycle safety through education, training and licensing. Since 1973 about 3.2 million motorcyclists have taken MSF training courses. The organization also works with the states to integrate rider safety and skills in licensing tests. It also promotes safety by recommending motorcycle operators wear protective gear, especially helmets, ride sober and ride within their skill limits.

Motorcycle Helmets: In 2005 motorcycle helmets saved 1,546 lives. NHTSA says that if all motorcyclists had worn helmets 728 more lives would have been saved. Helmets are estimated to be 37 percent effective in preventing fatal injuries.

A NHTSA study covering 10 states found that when universal helmet laws, which pertain to all riders, were repealed, helmet-use rates dropped from 99 percent to 50 percent. In states where the universal law was reinstated, helmet-use rates rose to above 95 percent.
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Old 03-20-2007, 05:31 PM
 
251 posts, read 806,860 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunrico90 View Post
I have friends that enjoy motorcycles and some have mentioned that helmets do save lifes, but they do like to ride without a helmet. What is your opinion?

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration conducted the first study, and it found that in the three years following Florida’s decision to repeal its mandatory helmet law in 2000 that there were 933 motorcyclists killed. The number of Florida motorcycle deaths increased 81 percent, an increase from the 515 bikers killed from 1997 to 1999.
I owned a motorcycle in the past and have had 3 of my close friends killed on one. I don't know if wearing a helmet would have saved their lives however I don't understand why anyone would get on a motorcycle without a helmet.
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Old 03-20-2007, 06:06 PM
 
170 posts, read 230,312 times
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OF COURSE!

How can you ride a motorcycle and NOT wear a helmet? You've gotta be darn crazy not to, IMHO!
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Old 03-20-2007, 06:49 PM
 
66 posts, read 289,366 times
Reputation: 52
I remember this stuff from California. My feeling is still the same.

As long as I am not required by law to stop and render aid for head & neck injuries, don't wear a helmet.

I have had to pull a couple burning choppers off guys (heavy!!!!) with bashed heads. I say I won't stop again. Don't know. But, if you are not interested in protecting yourself, how do you expect the rest of us to feel when we stop for the crash and see your bare, bloody head?
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Old 03-20-2007, 06:55 PM
 
2,542 posts, read 3,615,440 times
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If they do mandate helmets, then seat belts should also be as well as carrying workers in the back of pick-up and the open utility trailers.....
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Old 03-20-2007, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
5,702 posts, read 22,235,669 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bnepler View Post
If they do mandate helmets, then seat belts should also be as well as carrying workers in the back of pick-up and the open utility trailers.....
Maybe our lawyers or policeman can provide inside to this question
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Old 03-20-2007, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Miami. Florida
942 posts, read 2,365,571 times
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I believe it is the law in Miami-Dade county to where seat belts.
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Old 03-20-2007, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
5,702 posts, read 22,235,669 times
Reputation: 2987
Only eleven votes, do we have any motorcycle guys/gals that want to present their view?
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