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Old 05-17-2009, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Jersey Shore
831 posts, read 2,147,426 times
Reputation: 299

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Quote:
Originally Posted by OrlandoRE_Miracle View Post
Mouse,
Thanks for the information. So would you suggest buying a Florida home built in the '90s, then--old enough for problems to have shown up already (and built before the Chinese drywall problem), but new enough to avoid some of the insurance problems that "old" homes have here? Thanks.
I just wanted to give you and FYI. I recently switched my homeowners insurance and what the agent told me was some companies are not insuring homes built prior to 2001 (this may only pertain to new policies written) It may be something you want to check into. I would personally be more concerned about obtaining homeowners insurance rather then the chinese drywall. You can find out who the builder was on the newer homes and if the drywall was used and also perform an inspection before buying, however if you can't insure the home whats the point of buying it.

 
Old 05-17-2009, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Niceville, FL
7,681 posts, read 16,101,231 times
Reputation: 7700
Quote:
Originally Posted by mango23 View Post
First being get those trees away from the house that can do damage. Trees account for 50% of all the damage done by storms even mild ones and is totally preventable. Next month is June and anyone who hasn't tended to their trees by then are fools.
There are any number of good landscaping books and you can also probably get help from a local extension office when it comes to trees that are wind tolerant v. trees that go down in light tropical storm force wind. You don't want to cut down a nice wind tolerant shade tree willy-nilly because it actually can help keep your AC bills down in the summer. There are tree species you almost always want to cut down (ie. the bleepin' shortleaf pines in my neighborhood left over from the turpentine plantation days). And there are tree species like live oaks that are generally wind tolerant in terms of trunk when they're healthy, but you have to carefully monitor them because they tend to drop branches over time even without storms coming through.

Just had to say something there because the live oaks are so worth an arborist's expense when they're mature, and I hate to see them cut down altogether in the name of possible storm damage.
 
Old 05-17-2009, 09:19 AM
 
2,414 posts, read 4,803,545 times
Reputation: 645
About two months ago I got a list of companies writing new policy in Orange county and called them all--most of them told me they would insure an older house (sometimes not more than 40/50 years old though)--but you needed to have a four point inspection, and the roof needed to be updated based on what type it was and how old it was. But rules may not be as strict as for you since this isn't a coastal area.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dmccauley View Post
I just wanted to give you and FYI. I recently switched my homeowners insurance and what the agent told me was some companies are not insuring homes built prior to 2001 (this may only pertain to new policies written) It may be something you want to check into. I would personally be more concerned about obtaining homeowners insurance rather then the chinese drywall. You can find out who the builder was on the newer homes and if the drywall was used and also perform an inspection before buying, however if you can't insure the home whats the point of buying it.
 
Old 05-17-2009, 09:31 AM
 
541 posts, read 1,816,704 times
Reputation: 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by mango23 View Post
Don't be confused by negatives of peoples whose lives are not what they wish. It is easy to just look for something to place blame for your own failings or bad luck. I sometimes click on their history to see what else they write. In many cases all they write are negative comments. They seek out threads they can wade into with their often inflammatory comments. Not because they really feel they are adding anything, it is just what they do. I read quite a few technical forums where it is usually an honest exchange of ideas. Here though there is actual hate mongering. It's very curious.
I can't speak for other people but my life is quite happy. I don't blame others for anything. I try to tell it like it is. Some people may not like it but it is what we see daily. It is not cheaper here. It is hard to find a decent job, the crime is bad, public schools stink, weather in the summer is brutal. The homes are not great. It is transient-esp. to a person that grew up somewhere where people lived for 30+ years on the same street. These are important things to know before you move. Do we like it-sure there are many positives too! I also post those. I love the beach and theme parks and have posted many pictures. I hope we can afford to stay. I like things about every place I have lived. I am an easy going happy person. The ideal would be May-December up north and January-April in Florida.
 
Old 05-17-2009, 09:38 AM
 
541 posts, read 1,816,704 times
Reputation: 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by MegDrew View Post
But you do seem to be saying that in making the move with caution and research, some people can succeed? I certainly hope so. Some posts make Florida seem like a terrible wasteland, but I have some family down there that are quite content.
I don't know. I'm no risk taker and make every major decision in life with foresight and as much knowledge as I can get. Seriously, it can't be all THAT bad?
It's discouraging to hear the negatives, but I suppose it's good to know what to watch out for.
We love things here too. I like where we live very much. I love the theme parks, beaches, restaurants, etc. I post those positives too. On this thread though there were posters wondering why on Earth any normal person would move away after they had moved to place. Use your brain- there are many reasons! No good jobs, crime, place changed, family, liked other place better after living in new place for a while, found better work elsewhere, schools not living up to expectations, new adventure, etc, etc. That is why I got into this thread.
 
Old 05-17-2009, 09:49 AM
 
1,468 posts, read 4,166,343 times
Reputation: 1071
Quote:
Originally Posted by beachmouse View Post
There are any number of good landscaping books and you can also probably get help from a local extension office when it comes to trees that are wind tolerant v. trees that go down in light tropical storm force wind. You don't want to cut down a nice wind tolerant shade tree willy-nilly because it actually can help keep your AC bills down in the summer. There are tree species you almost always want to cut down (ie. the bleepin' shortleaf pines in my neighborhood left over from the turpentine plantation days). And there are tree species like live oaks that are generally wind tolerant in terms of trunk when they're healthy, but you have to carefully monitor them because they tend to drop branches over time even without storms coming through.

Just had to say something there because the live oaks are so worth an arborist's expense when they're mature, and I hate to see them cut down altogether in the name of possible storm damage.
It doesn't mean removing all the trees. It means you don't want massive limbs over hanging you roof and you want the tree thinned out so wind can pass through them, take out the dead wood and so on. Just some common sense stuff.

Of course then we have the dreaded Ficus that will not only fall on your house but the roots are probably growing through your foundation.

http://ornae.com/images/fullsize/090ficus.jpg
http://www.allmiamilandscape.com/tree-preparation.html

Last edited by mango23; 05-17-2009 at 10:11 AM..
 
Old 05-17-2009, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Jersey Shore
831 posts, read 2,147,426 times
Reputation: 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by OrlandoRE_Miracle View Post
About two months ago I got a list of companies writing new policy in Orange county and called them all--most of them told me they would insure an older house (sometimes not more than 40/50 years old though)--but you needed to have a four point inspection, and the roof needed to be updated based on what type it was and how old it was. But rules may not be as strict as for you since this isn't a coastal area.
If you have to change the roof and update the entire home to "get up to code" is it worth it? I wouldn't think so especially since you could buy a newer home for the same price maybe less in todays market, but to each his own.
 
Old 05-17-2009, 10:08 AM
 
2,414 posts, read 4,803,545 times
Reputation: 645
It might be in this market, if you can get a fantastic deal on a house that scares other buyers off, and your willing to put the time into it. At some of the houses I've gone to see the realtor said the seller has updated the roof recently (last couple of years). Whether "updating" means replacing the entire roof, or radically redoing the house to meet insurance requirements, and how much it ends up costing, I don't know. Maybe mango23 or one of the other people on here can answer. There are a lot of older homes here in the Orlando area that are older, some in very desirable areas. Someone is buying and insuring them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dmccauley View Post
If you have to change the roof and update the entire home to "get up to code" is it worth it? I wouldn't think so especially since you could buy a newer home for the same price maybe less in todays market, but to each his own.
 
Old 05-17-2009, 10:50 AM
 
Location: where my heart is
5,642 posts, read 7,969,609 times
Reputation: 1661
Default We bought in December 2007

Quote:
Originally Posted by OrlandoRE_Miracle View Post
It might be in this market, if you can get a fantastic deal on a house that scares other buyers off, and your willing to put the time into it. At some of the houses I've gone to see the realtor said the seller has updated the roof recently (last couple of years). Whether "updating" means replacing the entire roof, or radically redoing the house to meet insurance requirements, and how much it ends up costing, I don't know. Maybe mango23 or one of the other people on here can answer. There are a lot of older homes here in the Orlando area that are older, some in very desirable areas. Someone is buying and insuring them.
We were told by our realtor that the state would give us tax credits to meet the 2002 hurricane code. Our's was built in 2001, and fortunately, when we had it inspected, we found that it was built to 2002 codes. You may find that even with older homes they probably have been updated. Wouldn't this be an insurance issue anyway? If these homes weren't updated, couldn't the insurance company refuse to cover them?
 
Old 05-17-2009, 11:26 AM
 
569 posts, read 1,494,759 times
Reputation: 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunny-Days90 View Post
So yet another person who moved to Florida and expected something they did not get? Now want to move back to Ohio.

Why did they move to Florida in the first place? Coming back here only tells me they should not have moved in the first place or are just wanting to live as cheaply as they can and will give up enjoying life at all cost.

They moved to Florida for a reason and now want to move back? Does not make any sense to me.

If I move to Florida and do not like the town we chose I sure the hell am not moving back here, I am moving to enjoy life, not come back here and be cold again.
This person moved to Florida from Ohio around 30 years ago probably like most people for the weather and dreams of adventure. Started and raised a family in Florida and kids still live in Florida. The reason for moving back to Ohio at this stage is purely expense related since they liked it here. Yes they are sacrificing lifestyle for cheaper living but it can't be helped. Florida has just gotten totally out of hand in relation to what jobs pay. You can buy a house very cheaply in Ohio and still pay the bills on a Florida style crap job or close to it. You won't get ahead probably but you can keep your home. This is just not possible in Florida. You have to make big money to live here now and afford the cost of living. Hence all the foreclosures and people trying to sell to get out. This person was able to buy a decent house for $30K in Ohio outside of Akron in a good area. Not in Akron ghetto or close to it. You can't even buy a mobile home in Florida for that price. Plus the lot fees are $800 per month even if you could. Also car insurance in Florida is at least double of Ohio. Food is more, taxes are a lot higher, homeowners insurance is out of sight, etc. Right now I can't think of anything that's cheaper. All this and there are nothing but crap jobs in Florida that people are supposed to be grateful just to have. Florida is a very tough place if you don't have an excellent job but the unemployed dreamers still come. Most can't stay once the rose colored glasses fall off though or they try to scam.
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