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Old 07-06-2009, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Daytona Beach, Florida
499 posts, read 1,595,277 times
Reputation: 493

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Basically, you're seeking something with character. But you're going to need a Florida history lesson first.

Most of Florida was developed after WW2. The older/historic towns were built on the railway lines. During these historic times, outside of the winter season in S. Florida (and the advent of A/C), THESE AREAS WERE HOT, BUG INFESTED SWAMPS!

This means there were only a FEW towns that were in existence south of Tampa, that have not turned into some type of urban sprawl development. (Although you could live in the old downtown historic home areas)

Beach towns didn't really spring up until the 1920's because it was considered "crazy" by previous generations to live there, although "beach and fishing cabins" existed for weekends, you lived in a "nomal" house on the mainland.

So do your homework and locate historic maps with the railway lines. The other areas would also be located off of US designated highways such as US301, US17, US27 (and to a small percent US1, US41), US92, US98, etc. and Florida Coastal Hwy A1A.

The challenge you will find is that most of the rural or historic areas that are still untouched are mostly inland, away from the coastlines. This is because the coastline/coastal towns were much more demanded by developers.

The only coastal area that I know of which is still (fairly) pristine is the coastline north from Dunedin to the Panhandle, which is north of Tampa.
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Old 07-07-2009, 06:56 AM
 
15,112 posts, read 31,005,993 times
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Maybe Lutz or Odessa.
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Old 07-07-2009, 08:14 AM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,456,308 times
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Parrish. But I'd rather be in Lake Placid, Sebring, Avon park. Rural but not in the middle of no where. Far enough to have a lot of privacy but still close enough to civilization that you don't ahve to drive 28 miles for a gallon of milk.
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Old 07-09-2009, 08:05 PM
 
151 posts, read 648,955 times
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Ok, this could be another factor in budgeting. If I move to any of these rural areas and there is a hurricane do people still evacuate? Are mandatory evacuations in coastal regions only? (how far away from the coast do you have to be?).
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Old 07-09-2009, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Niceville, FL
7,647 posts, read 16,029,989 times
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Hurricane evacuation zones vary not only on how close you are to the water but also how high you are above sea level and how near you are to other bodies of water (ie. rivers) that are prone to flooding from heavy rainfall. So you can have evacuation orders pretty far inland for river and swampy areas (see what Tropical Storm Fay did last year) and non-evacuation areas very close to the coast once you get to a point about 30 feet above mean sea level.
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Old 07-09-2009, 09:14 PM
 
151 posts, read 648,955 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachmouse View Post
Hurricane evacuation zones vary not only on how close you are to the water but also how high you are above sea level and how near you are to other bodies of water (ie. rivers) that are prone to flooding from heavy rainfall. So you can have evacuation orders pretty far inland for river and swampy areas (see what Tropical Storm Fay did last year) and non-evacuation areas very close to the coast once you get to a point about 30 feet above mean sea level.
I found these after reading your post to be a big help.

Florida DEM Disaster Preparedness Maps

Example: (suppose I just find the white areas)
http://floridadisaster.org/PublicMapping/SurgeZones/SurgeZones_Collier.pdf (broken link)
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Old 07-09-2009, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Daytona Beach, Florida
499 posts, read 1,595,277 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpicard View Post
Ok, this could be another factor in budgeting. If I move to any of these rural areas and there is a hurricane do people still evacuate? Are mandatory evacuations in coastal regions only? (how far away from the coast do you have to be?).
OK, another lesson. While Hurricane "Season" is officially from June 1 - Nov 1, the real focus for "peak" storms is August/Sept when they come across the Atlantic from the African coast, due to the high surf temps. When the surf temps elevate in the Gulf or Caribbean, this also may produce tropical storms which may also eventually elevate into hurricanes effecting Florida, outside of these "peak" season times mentioned.

Bottom line is that people still move to California with the fires, earthquakes, mudslides, tsunamis, crime, congestion, etc. Have they fallen off the crust of the planet yet?

If you want to move to Florida, you'll have to deal with Hurricanes (and ocassionally tornadoes), esp. if you want to live in S. Florida w/ the Global Warming issue.

If you live in ANY frame structure (which would have character, etc.), there is NO DOUBT that you would want to evacuate if there was a chance of a Level 2 Hurricane or above.

Remember that the issue for evacuation is NOT survival of the storm, but rather the aftermath! (Even if your home falls apart, or not, and you survive the storm, what about not having power for several months afterwards at the peak of summer temperatures? Your garbage may not be collected for months in your neighborhood and rats will infest. Leaving your french doors open at night during this time "seems" like a good idea. What if there's also looters on top of it? Zillions of people need repairs/supplies at once. Do you really think they can attend to yours and get supplies quickly with such demands?)

You can just as easily make phone calls in air conditioned comfort w/ hot water, opened grocery/drug stores, etc. in another location to get your home fixed than "being there!" If your home is truly destroyed, what can you really do about it immediately afterward (because it's not going to be back to "normal" next week)?

To me, evacuation takes place 2 days before the estimated hit. You've got time to board up, make arrangements, make plans and get out.

If this a budgeting issue, MAKE AN EVACUATION PLAN TO DO THIS BEFORE YOU BUY. Also, make sure you've got good quotes for insurance coverage too.

People keep thinking that the "grass is greener" by moving to Florida because of the winters. While the winters are great here, there are still issues, esp. that Florida now has similar costs of living to northern States to consider. If you live up north, you still have to deal with mudslides, blizzards, floods, fires and black outs. Florida may not have these exact problems, but ours are just "different" and maybe more frequent to consider.

If you want to play with the big dawgs, you better be ready to pony up!

Good luck!
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Old 07-09-2009, 11:24 PM
 
151 posts, read 648,955 times
Reputation: 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by daytonadewd View Post
OK, another lesson. While Hurricane "Season" is officially from June 1 - Nov 1, the real focus for "peak" storms is August/Sept when they come across the Atlantic from the African coast, due to the high surf temps. When the surf temps elevate in the Gulf or Caribbean, this also may produce tropical storms which may also eventually elevate into hurricanes effecting Florida, outside of these "peak" season times mentioned.

Bottom line is that people still move to California with the fires, earthquakes, mudslides, tsunamis, crime, congestion, etc. Have they fallen off the crust of the planet yet?

If you want to move to Florida, you'll have to deal with Hurricanes (and ocassionally tornadoes), esp. if you want to live in S. Florida w/ the Global Warming issue.

If you live in ANY frame structure (which would have character, etc.), there is NO DOUBT that you would want to evacuate if there was a chance of a Level 2 Hurricane or above.

Remember that the issue for evacuation is NOT survival of the storm, but rather the aftermath! (Even if your home falls apart, or not, and you survive the storm, what about not having power for several months afterwards at the peak of summer temperatures? Your garbage may not be collected for months in your neighborhood and rats will infest. Leaving your french doors open at night during this time "seems" like a good idea. What if there's also looters on top of it? Zillions of people need repairs/supplies at once. Do you really think they can attend to yours and get supplies quickly with such demands?)

You can just as easily make phone calls in air conditioned comfort w/ hot water, opened grocery/drug stores, etc. in another location to get your home fixed than "being there!" If your home is truly destroyed, what can you really do about it immediately afterward (because it's not going to be back to "normal" next week)?

To me, evacuation takes place 2 days before the estimated hit. You've got time to board up, make arrangements, make plans and get out.

If this a budgeting issue, MAKE AN EVACUATION PLAN TO DO THIS BEFORE YOU BUY. Also, make sure you've got good quotes for insurance coverage too.

People keep thinking that the "grass is greener" by moving to Florida because of the winters. While the winters are great here, there are still issues, esp. that Florida now has similar costs of living to northern States to consider. If you live up north, you still have to deal with mudslides, blizzards, floods, fires and black outs. Florida may not have these exact problems, but ours are just "different" and maybe more frequent to consider.

If you want to play with the big dawgs, you better be ready to pony up!

Good luck!
So even in those white areas that I believe are evacation locations that is still not good enough spots to pick to avoid evacuation? I was considering moving to one of those areas and building a home that can withstand the hurricanes.

As for the grass being greener sure it really is a trade off. I feel like all the driving in the snow and ice is risking my life each time because of the other clowns on the road. But even with that I have never had to evacuate because of too much snow and ice. But I am completely miserable for 9 months out of the year and only enjoy life in June, July and August because of the weather. To add to it the bubble has not burst where I live, it does not look like it ever will and taxes on homes went from $1500 to $15000 in less than a decade. So I have to leave since I cannot afford to buy here since I missed my pre-bubble opportunity (who would have thought). But good thing I did not buy since the taxes are just nuts here compared to Florida.

Homes and property taxes are so much cheaper in Florida compared to here in NY. I know I will have to deal with evacuation costs, homeowners insurance and prepardness. I like to be prepared and considering supplies like generator, water, food, lumber, etc. But the one thing on my mind is why not just move to one of those areas considered in the evacuation route and building a cinder block home or something that withstand the storms.
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Old 07-10-2009, 01:52 AM
 
Location: Daytona Beach, Florida
499 posts, read 1,595,277 times
Reputation: 493
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpicard View Post
So even in those white areas that I believe are evacation locations that is still not good enough spots to pick to avoid evacuation? I was considering moving to one of those areas and building a home that can withstand the hurricanes.

As for the grass being greener sure it really is a trade off. I feel like all the driving in the snow and ice is risking my life each time because of the other clowns on the road. But even with that I have never had to evacuate because of too much snow and ice. But I am completely miserable for 9 months out of the year and only enjoy life in June, July and August because of the weather. To add to it the bubble has not burst where I live, it does not look like it ever will and taxes on homes went from $1500 to $15000 in less than a decade. So I have to leave since I cannot afford to buy here since I missed my pre-bubble opportunity (who would have thought). But good thing I did not buy since the taxes are just nuts here compared to Florida.

Homes and property taxes are so much cheaper in Florida compared to here in NY. I know I will have to deal with evacuation costs, homeowners insurance and prepardness. I like to be prepared and considering supplies like generator, water, food, lumber, etc. But the one thing on my mind is why not just move to one of those areas considered in the evacuation route and building a cinder block home or something that withstand the storms.
OK, so you're building a home to withstand hurricanes, have a power generator, etc. Very self-sufficient 4 U.

WHERE DO YOU BUY YOUR FOOD, PRESCRIPTIONS AND HOME REPAIR MATERIALS AFTER THE STORM IN THIS RURAL AREA THAT YOU CAN AFFORD? IS YOUR EXPECTATION THAT YOU'LL BE ABLE TO GET THESE SUPPLIES STRAIGHT AWAY? What about your daily MAIL/Deliveries in such a ravaged area? (GOOD LUCK!)

The homes MIGHT be cheaper, but NOT necessarily the TAXES!
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Old 07-10-2009, 05:14 AM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,456,308 times
Reputation: 13016
Quote:
Originally Posted by daytonadewd View Post
OK, so you're building a home to withstand hurricanes, have a power generator, etc. Very self-sufficient 4 U.

WHERE DO YOU BUY YOUR FOOD, PRESCRIPTIONS AND HOME REPAIR MATERIALS AFTER THE STORM IN THIS RURAL AREA THAT YOU CAN AFFORD? IS YOUR EXPECTATION THAT YOU'LL BE ABLE TO GET THESE SUPPLIES STRAIGHT AWAY? What about your daily MAIL/Deliveries in such a ravaged area? (GOOD LUCK!)

The homes MIGHT be cheaper, but NOT necessarily the TAXES!
I live in a semi-rural area inland, 240 feet above sea level. Our 2004 built home will easily withstand at cat 3 without major damage. We have a safe room. (Forget the hurricane, it's the tornados it spawns that scare me!) This area has never been hit by anything stronger than a cat 3, usually it's just a TS.

At the beginning of hurricane season we make sure to have at least a weeks worth of food and water (including for the animals), plus fuel for our generator and camp stove. We also have a months worth of meds (we squirrel away by refilling asap through the year, buys us an extra month at the end of the year.) In all honesty we could probably go two weeks on food and water if we needed to.

We have blue tarps, wood strips and nails to attach them with, etc., etc.

Mail? Big whoop. My bills are all paid a month in advance, and set for autopay anyhow. I have cash in the safe--enough to buy what I need for a couple of weeks and get out if need be.

And I'm well insured, my insurance will pay for another place for me to live if my home gets blown away until it can be rebuilt. I'm NOT going to flood, I'm 240 feet above sea level and at the highest point in the neghborhood--most of the surrounding area is 20' or more lower than my home.

Some of us do have a plan, and a good one.

Agreed about the taxes, though, mine are almost $10K.
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