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Old 07-24-2009, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Michigan
29 posts, read 56,371 times
Reputation: 25

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I frequently contemplate the thoughts of moving to the panhandle, but as many have suggested, the hurricane threat is one thing to consider.

Why is it that cbs or 2x6 construction in the panhandle is virually non-existent?

I can look up and down the east and west coast of florida and find very sturdily structured homes listed any time, but in the pandhandle, zip. In fact they dont even list that info on realtor.com, but they do with the rest of Florida? I honestly think the northwest part of Florida is just as dangerous, when it comes to hurricanes, as the rest of Florida, so what gives?
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Old 07-24-2009, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Miami
6,853 posts, read 19,761,181 times
Reputation: 2906
I think its because the state hasn't set a state wide building code. They have left it up to the individual counties to set the building codes. Which in my opinion is really not right. All of Florida should be built CBS, it just takes one Cat 5 storm to go from West Palm Beach, cut across the lake and Orlando and then come out over by Crystal River and hit Tallahassee at a Cat 1. If you are looking a buying a home anyplace in Florida in my opinion (I survived Hurricane Andrew Cat 5 in 1992) buy a CBS house. Make sure it has shutters, if not get them when you buy the house don't wait till hurricane season.

A few years ago, I remember passing buy some townhouses that were being built in the Keys on the Ocean all out of wood, not on stilts, it just boggled my mind, who in their right mind would invest their money in a home like that in the Keys. Just an example how each county is different. Where in Miami-Dade to the north with the toughest building codes in the country you can't build a home with wood, CBS is the way.
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Old 07-24-2009, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Michigan
29 posts, read 56,371 times
Reputation: 25
I really like the panhandle but with 2x4 being the standard type structure, I just dont know...
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Old 07-24-2009, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
807 posts, read 2,820,773 times
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I can tell you that after wiring hundreds of homes in Pinellas, Hillsborough, Pasco, Hernando and Citrus counties, 2x4 construction is the norm. When I moved to Walton county I was struck by the superior construction methods here. Block walls are reinforced and poured with concrete. Exterior walls are firred with 2x4's and not 3/4" strips. Interior walls are 2x6.

Your information is incorrect.
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Old 07-24-2009, 04:57 PM
 
1,468 posts, read 4,155,968 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geekstreat View Post
I really like the panhandle but with 2x4 being the standard type structure, I just dont know...
Build your own house. It will be a fun experience and it will be done the way you want and right.

Ever see one of these homes?
Dac-Art-Lintel-3.mpg
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Old 07-24-2009, 09:03 PM
 
Location: Broward County
2,517 posts, read 9,891,494 times
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because they are morons
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Old 07-24-2009, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Michigan
29 posts, read 56,371 times
Reputation: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by On-da-Beach View Post
I can tell you that after wiring hundreds of homes in Pinellas, Hillsborough, Pasco, Hernando and Citrus counties, 2x4 construction is the norm. When I moved to Walton county I was struck by the superior construction methods here. Block walls are reinforced and poured with concrete. Exterior walls are firred with 2x4's and not 3/4" strips. Interior walls are 2x6.

Your information is incorrect.
I havent been looking on the west coast, but on the east coast, 90% of the homes for sale are CBS. And every panhandle home listed on realtor right now, constructed after 2000 it seems are frame built. None are concrete wall. You can look for yourself. Ill double check my info, but Im pretty sure theyre not CBS.
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Old 07-24-2009, 09:46 PM
 
Location: Michigan
29 posts, read 56,371 times
Reputation: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by mango23 View Post
Build your own house. It will be a fun experience and it will be done the way you want and right.

Ever see one of these homes?
Dac-Art-Lintel-3.mpg
Yeah, I know. Can withstand a cat 5, sure, but the cost?? Its out of my budget. I appreciate the link though.
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Old 07-25-2009, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Venice Florida
1,380 posts, read 5,231,372 times
Reputation: 864
I'd love to hear opinions by structural engineers on this subject, but it's my understanding that there are a number of ways to engineer a home to withstand wind loads of 140+ mph. Today's manufactured home are rated at 140mph.

If you look at the way the frame homes are constructed, you should see that they are tied down to the foundation with numerous anchors and metal straps from the foundation to the roof. The frame construction may have more tolerance for movement than does CBS.

In resent years many "frame" homes are using metal studs instead of wood studs. This probably has more to do with wood destroying organisms than withstanding wind loads.

But my guess as to why you'll see more frame construction in the panhandle is 1) cost of construction, and 2) the architectural style of construction.
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Old 07-25-2009, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Miami
6,853 posts, read 19,761,181 times
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^^^Did you see the homes that were built out of wood that went through hurricane Andrew? Do a google search for Country Walk neighborhood which has homes that were built out of stick and went through Andrew. Not a nice site. I could care less what wind speed someone would tell me a stick home can withstand, no way would I consider staying in a stick house during a hurricane. Just because other things factor into hurricanes other than wind, debris is a huge factor. A 3x4 flying around will go right though those wood walls like paper. I wish I had a picture of this 2x4 that went through a huge Royal Palm during Andrew. Half hanging out on each side of the Palm. Can you imagine if that went through a stick built house. Tornados are also another factor part of hurricanes.
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