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Old 07-31-2010, 08:45 PM
 
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We recently switched to unbleached flour because we saw on this cooking show called Gen's Guiltless Gourmet that actual bleach is used to bleach flour and the host, Gen, said to always use unbleached flour. Why are they bleaching flour, and why do we accept this?
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Old 07-31-2010, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Colorado
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I found this:
Quote:
When flour is first milled it has a yellowish tinge that consumers generally find unappealing. If the flour is stored and allowed to age naturally for several months, the color will fade. However, most flour producers find that storing large amounts of flour for long periods of time is too expensive. Instead, they choose to whiten their flour with a chemical bleaching agent such as benzoyl peroxide.

Other agents that artificially age the flour are added as well, since mature flour produces better baking results and has a longer shelf life than newly milled flour. Because the bleaching process causes some nutrients to be lost, U.S. law requires that the flour be enriched—meaning that nutrients are returned to the flour.
Food and Nutrition - Why Is Flour Bleached?: Science Fact Finder
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Old 07-31-2010, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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During the depression, and other times of famine, when flour was distributed free to the needy, it was unbleached. So unbleached flour was called "dole flour", and people who could afford to buy flour didn't want to be mistaken for indigent, so they demanded bleached flour. They would have been ashamed to serve brown "dole bread".
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Old 08-01-2010, 01:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
During the depression, and other times of famine, when flour was distributed free to the needy, it was unbleached. So unbleached flour was called "dole flour", and people who could afford to buy flour didn't want to be mistaken for indigent, so they demanded bleached flour. They would have been ashamed to serve brown "dole bread".

Think of the absurdity of that, "We're not poor, so give us the one that's really bad for us and has been bleached with actual bleach." But then again, back in those days Drs. used to prescribe cigarettes for stress. There's no excuse now though, and it's a disgrace that flour is bleached, just to look good.
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Old 08-01-2010, 02:46 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
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"Flour bleaching agent is a food additive added to flour in order to make it appear whiter (freshly milled flour is yellowish) and to oxidize the surfaces of the flour grains and help with developing of gluten.

Usual bleaching agents are:
Organic peroxides, namely benzoyl peroxide
Calcium peroxide
Nitrogen dioxide
Chlorine
Chlorine dioxide, which is reported to produce diabetes-causing contaminant alloxan[1] when reacting with the proteins contained in flour[citation needed]
Azodicarbonamide
Atmospheric oxygen, used during natural aging of flour

Use of chlorine, bromates, and peroxides is not allowed in the European Union.

Flours treated with bleaches and improving agents generally show higher loaf volume and finer grain. However, people with very sensitive palates can detect a slight bitter aftertaste.

Chlorinated cake flour improves the structure forming capacity, allowing the use of dough formulas with lower proportions of flour and higher proportions of sugar. In biscuit manufacturing, chlorination of flour is used to control the spread – treated flour reduces the spread and provides a tighter surface. The changes of functional properties of the flour proteins are likely to be caused by their oxidation."

What is lost in the refining process?

*Half of the beneficial unsaturated fatty acids
*Virtually all of the vitamin
*Fifty percent of the calcium
*Seventy percent of the phosphorus
*Eighty percent of the iron
*Ninety eight percent of the magnesium
*Fifty to 80 percent of the B vitamins

Bleaching results the formation of alloxan in the flour.
Alloxan causes diabetes because it spins up enormous amounts of free radicals in pancreatic beta cells, thus destroying them.
Bleached Flour Dangers and Chemicals

Sounds yummy, no???
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Old 08-01-2010, 08:08 PM
 
4,148 posts, read 2,590,042 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
"Flour bleaching agent is a food additive added to flour in order to make it appear whiter (freshly milled flour is yellowish) and to oxidize the surfaces of the flour grains and help with developing of gluten.

Usual bleaching agents are:
Organic peroxides, namely benzoyl peroxide
Calcium peroxide
Nitrogen dioxide
Chlorine
Chlorine dioxide, which is reported to produce diabetes-causing contaminant alloxan[1] when reacting with the proteins contained in flour[citation needed]
Azodicarbonamide
Atmospheric oxygen, used during natural aging of flour

Use of chlorine, bromates, and peroxides is not allowed in the European Union.

Flours treated with bleaches and improving agents generally show higher loaf volume and finer grain. However, people with very sensitive palates can detect a slight bitter aftertaste.

Chlorinated cake flour improves the structure forming capacity, allowing the use of dough formulas with lower proportions of flour and higher proportions of sugar. In biscuit manufacturing, chlorination of flour is used to control the spread treated flour reduces the spread and provides a tighter surface. The changes of functional properties of the flour proteins are likely to be caused by their oxidation."

What is lost in the refining process?

*Half of the beneficial unsaturated fatty acids
*Virtually all of the vitamin
*Fifty percent of the calcium
*Seventy percent of the phosphorus
*Eighty percent of the iron
*Ninety eight percent of the magnesium
*Fifty to 80 percent of the B vitamins

Bleaching results the formation of alloxan in the flour.
Alloxan causes diabetes because it spins up enormous amounts of free radicals in pancreatic beta cells, thus destroying them.
Bleached Flour Dangers and Chemicals

Sounds yummy, no???
Unbelievable, why is this legal, and why is the bleached one more than the unbleached, they charge more for the one that doesn't need all of those extra steps, I don't get it?
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Old 08-01-2010, 08:12 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,443 posts, read 18,084,347 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophiasmommy View Post
Unbelievable, why is this legal, and why is the bleached one more than the unbleached, they charge more for the one that doesn't need all of those extra steps, I don't get it?
Not even gonna get started on why the FDA allows things....to much for my blood pressure tonight, but I will take a stab at why unbleached flour costs more, and that would be because they can get away with it.
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Old 08-01-2010, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Destrehan, Louisiana
2,192 posts, read 3,748,247 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophiasmommy View Post
We recently switched to unbleached flour because we saw on this cooking show called Gen's Guiltless Gourmet that actual bleach is used to bleach flour and the host, Gen, said to always use unbleached flour. Why are they bleaching flour, and why do we accept this?

If you knew what they do to sugar to make it white you would never eat it.

busta
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Old 08-02-2010, 02:00 PM
 
2,643 posts, read 2,671,119 times
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One good benefit is for people on a renal diet. You want all the extra phosphorus removed. So white bread replaces whole wheat. It's for that limited reason for a relatively small number of people, but it really does help!
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Old 08-02-2010, 02:10 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
21,644 posts, read 23,899,117 times
Reputation: 52087
Why they sell bleached flour???
Because it has longer shelf life ( who knows how old is that stuff really! - some has even insects living in ),
and because when you bake bread with bleached flour you can get "more" bread with less flour.

BTW: oh, this is just great
http://www.jbc.org/content/6/1/75.full.pdf
Idaho Observer: Bleaching agent in flour linked to diabetes
http://www.buzzle.com/editorials/10-4-2005-78138.asp

and even more bad news:
http://www.naturalnews.com/006760.html

Last edited by elnina; 08-02-2010 at 02:20 PM.. Reason: info added
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