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View Poll Results: Which Type Of Coffee Maker Do You Prefer: DRIP OR PERCOLATED?
I Prefer Drip Coffee Makers. 57 57.58%
I Prefer Percolator Coffee Makers. 28 28.28%
I'm Not Sure Which I Prefer. 5 5.05%
I Have No Opinion. 9 9.09%
Voters: 99. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-16-2010, 06:14 PM
 
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Neither. I use my French Press.
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Old 11-16-2010, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Charlotte county, Florida
4,102 posts, read 4,995,107 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stanman13 View Post
And then bounce off the walls for about 4 hours?
Yeah thats exactally what i'd do.. nothing in moderation here.
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Old 11-16-2010, 07:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StarlaJane View Post
I have a Bialetti stovetop (I'm not sure if that is considered a percolator but I think it is) and do not know how I ever drank drip. I especially don't like paper-filter drip b/c it wastes so much paper.

There are certain coffees that taste better with a drip, especially lighter roasts. However, for espresso/dark roasts, I think that percolators yield a better taste, although you do have to be careful not to burn it.
I use that one too with cafe bustelo. cheap and strong.
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Old 11-16-2010, 09:02 PM
 
14,790 posts, read 13,482,539 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StarlaJane View Post
I have a Bialetti stovetop (I'm not sure if that is considered a percolator but I think it is) and do not know how I ever drank drip. I especially don't like paper-filter drip b/c it wastes so much paper.

There are certain coffees that taste better with a drip, especially lighter roasts. However, for espresso/dark roasts, I think that percolators yield a better taste, although you do have to be careful not to burn it.
Grew up with Bialetti, and when I moved my grandmother made sure she gave me a new one.

Always drink espresso, never instant & don't know what drip is....
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Old 02-05-2011, 02:52 PM
 
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I've been a percolator coffee fan for years. My parents used a percolator when I was growing up and I remember the wonderful smells and sounds from that machine so naturally I had to use a perc too.

In college I had a roommate who used a Mr. Coffee drip coffee machine. Other friends and family members also used drip coffee machines. I've never liked any of the coffee that came from a drip.

Recently bought a french press and am looking forward to using it. French press users rave about it. I'm eager to see if it's as good or better than using a percolator.
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Old 02-05-2011, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Bangor Maine
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After years of messing around with the cheaper models of Mr. Coffee etc that run from $12 to $25 I finally bought a Braun for about $70 and am very happy with the performance and the coffee. Have had it now for almost 3 years.
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Old 03-24-2011, 02:40 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Fontucky View Post
I use a Bunn drip machine, but I have NO problem with percolated coffee from someone who knows how to make it. One of those who does is my sister. She makes excellent perc coffee in an old graniteware pot like the one in the pic.
The simplest and the best. I have an old Corning Ware stove-top percolator that belonged to my Aunt. I also picked up two more at garage sales, just in case.
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Old 10-02-2012, 05:49 PM
 
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K-cup
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Old 10-02-2012, 07:36 PM
 
Location: Volcano
12,971 posts, read 22,625,162 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by renault View Post
I've been a percolator coffee fan for years. My parents used a percolator when I was growing up and I remember the wonderful smells and sounds from that machine so naturally I had to use a perc too.
I realize this is an old post, but the whole topic has just been revived in another thread so I'll pitch in my opinion on the topic here as well.

Coffee experts, like coffee tasters and coffee blenders pretty much universally name percolators as one of the very worst ways to brew coffee. So why do some people name them as their favorites?

Mostly, I think, because it's what they are used to from some formative point in their lives, so they associate it with "good coffee" because it is associated with pleasurable emotions.

Stovetop percolators were the first "automatic" coffee makers, so they quickly became very popular. And electric models made them even more popular, because they could be used in other rooms than the kitchen. The biggest problem is that they boil the coffee, which extracts the most bitter taste elements and they burn the flavor oils that are responsible for the good taste and smell of well made coffee.

What percolators do best is to put coffee's taste and smell oils into the air, rather than into the cup. That's why they are ideal for real estate agents who are staging a house for an open house. They do make a kitchen smell amazing! But for best taste, there are better brewing methods.

They other thing they do is serve the very hottest possible coffee, literally making it possible for the coffee to still be boiling when it hits the cup. Frankly, this is dangerous, and can lead to scalding. And the heat tends to mask the bitterness in the taste, which is why some people come to associate very hot coffee with quality.

But the fullest tasting, richest, best tasting coffee is made... by a number of other methods... with water that is slightly below the boiling point of water, and is itself never directly heated. Filter paper coffee and French Press coffee are the two best known of those methods. French press is the coffee brewing method of choice for most coffee professional tasters.

But people have a tendancy to choose what they are most used to, over what is best. People are funny that way.
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Old 10-02-2012, 07:41 PM
 
15,824 posts, read 18,440,406 times
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I use an old corning glass percolator. Rich, flavorful coffee. I did enjoy my son n laws Krueger (sp?) while visiting recently...but I'm positive as much as I drink coffee I would go broke. lol
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