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Old 12-03-2010, 10:13 PM
 
Location: New Hope, MN
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I always hear about how stores throw tons of produce away, and just in school my business teacher told us how in some fancier grocery store in our city, they throw tons and tons out, saying they only sell it if it is absolute perfect, if there is a teeny tiny blemish or mark on it it gets thrown out? Does anyone know how much they throw out, like a percentage? Like 80% Or is that too high?
I don't think I could ever throw food out like that.
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Old 12-03-2010, 10:49 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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It varies highly by local store, chain, and maybe local laws, but I think they are lying if they say it's illegal to sell it.

My HEB store here goes through the produce at about 8 pm every night, and culls the imperfect produce, and marks it down, and there are quite a lot of shoppers who are there waiting for it, which I think is an admirable policy. Even my Sav-a-Lot store bags up and sells produce that gets mishandled and is no longer pretty.

At a Winn Dixie store near where I lived in Florida, the store had an arrangement with a local hog farmer, who went around back and filled his truck from the dumpster, but we usually got there first and picked over the good stuff.

I think it's way less than 80%, because I make it a point to case the dumpsters, and it it''s not there, where could it be?
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Old 12-03-2010, 11:16 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
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You got it right! Million of tons! About 63 percent of the average supermarket’s waste is food.
But study says that additional to that, 40 % of food waste occurred in the home. In California alone more than six million tons of food products are dumped annually.
In 2008 - 49 million people were hungry in the US ( up from 36,2 millions in 2007 ). Can you imagine how many hungry people are now?
How Many Football Stadiums Can America's Hungry People Fill? | Sustainable Food | Change.org
Major retail grocery chains are more likely to throw away fruits, vegetables and even entire hams and roasts than donate to distribution centers.
Estimated $20 billion worth of food that supermarkets throw away each year. Stores in the U.S. waste twice as much food annually as those in Europe, and a recent U.N. report found that total American food waste—including what we pitch from our refrigerators—is worth $48 billion each year.
Although federal and state laws protect grocers from liability, many stores expressed concerns that donated food could sicken recipients, even if it has yet to reach its expiration date. While some major chains donate food, others do not.
Curiously Awesome U.S. Supermarkets Waste Food
Good Food Should Not Go In Dumpsters
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Old 12-03-2010, 11:20 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
21,591 posts, read 23,714,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
It varies highly by local store, chain, and maybe local laws, but I think they are lying if they say it's illegal to sell it.
Good samaritan food donation act

The purpose of this chapter is to promote the free distribution of food to needy persons, prevent waste of food products, and provide liability protection for persons and organizations donating or distributing such food products.

Chapter 69.80 RCW: Food donation and distribution
Inter-Faith Food Shuttle: Emerson Protection Act (http://www.foodshuttle.org/elaw.html - broken link)
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Old 12-04-2010, 12:52 AM
 
Location: New Hope, MN
1,878 posts, read 2,741,294 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
It varies highly by local store, chain, and maybe local laws, but I think they are lying if they say it's illegal to sell it.

My HEB store here goes through the produce at about 8 pm every night, and culls the imperfect produce, and marks it down, and there are quite a lot of shoppers who are there waiting for it, which I think is an admirable policy. Even my Sav-a-Lot store bags up and sells produce that gets mishandled and is no longer pretty.?
Ok, thats good, instead of just throwing it out.

My teacher mentioned a grocery store, a pretty fancy expensive one that caters to wealthy people, and he said they are extremely picky with produce, and even the teeniest flaw in a piece of fruit, and they throw it out. There not saying it's illegal to sell it, there just doing it because its an expensive grocery store that caters to wealthy people. I have been in there a few times, they have carpet, and everything on their shelf has the label facing front, all the can foods are facing the right way, and are all neatly organized. I feel bad for the people who have to stock shelfs there. I'd love to be in there and watch them stock and go through produce, and see how much they throw out, because I was at walmart today, and the majority of the produce they had there, I bet that grocery store would throw it out and not sell it.
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Old 12-04-2010, 10:11 AM
 
2,060 posts, read 3,090,906 times
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I used to work in a grocery store which wasn't high end in any way and we still had to face the cans out when stacking them!

Walmart probably has a majority of that kind of produce because they aren't willing to pay what it costs to get the better stuff, even though they'll charge you the same for it.
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Old 12-04-2010, 12:38 PM
 
Location: GLAMA
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I once cooked for a local organization that fed the needy. We'd hit every grocery store in the area for donations of edible produce and baked goods that were headed to the dumpsters. The amounts we'd receive were amazing, and this was ONE Friday per month.
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Old 12-04-2010, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Illinois
2,813 posts, read 2,239,244 times
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How and why are they throwing away so much produce?

I mostly shop a local international market that will package and sell expiring produce. For instance, I got a good 12 "pickles" in a pack for $1. I also got 5 bell peppers for .99. This produce is extremely fresh from WI and IN farms when they get to the local store. So their "going out" date is par for the course with chain stores.

Also, for stores with kitchens (and most all have kitchens now) you would think they'd eat some of the cost by cooking the vegetables and selling them from their deli/kitchen components?
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Old 12-04-2010, 01:42 PM
 
8,686 posts, read 12,474,980 times
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Large chain stores throw very little produce away. It is a low margin item anyway and a little waste ruins the department bottom line. What they do is pass the problem along to produce wholesalers who have to deliver the requirement on a daily or several times weekly basis.

Now as to the waste of the produce wholesalers, that's another thing entirely.
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Old 12-04-2010, 03:42 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
38,755 posts, read 39,152,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
Good samaritan food donation act

The purpose of this chapter is to promote the free distribution of food to needy persons, prevent waste of food products, and provide liability protection for persons and organizations donating or distributing such food products.

Chapter 69.80 RCW: Food donation and distribution
Inter-Faith Food Shuttle: Emerson Protection Act (http://www.foodshuttle.org/elaw.html - broken link)
That bill does nothing but "promote" donation and distribution to organizations. The grocer still needs to separate donatable food from unacceptable garbage, and make logistical arrangements with organizations that accept the food, at the retailer's own cost. The bill also does nothing to promote the rights of citizens who seek to obtain discarded food directly from the retailer, either by asking in the store, or exploring the dumpster. In other words, dumpster diving can still be criminalized by local law. No food can be redistributed except by the active participation of the retailer in a costly process.
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