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Old 03-27-2011, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Heading to the NW, 4 sure.
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After hard boiling eggs and I put them in the refrigerator, unpeeled, how long are they good for?

I love HBE's esp w/a cold beer put some got put in the back and wonder how long they will last until they are peeled?

HW.
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Old 03-28-2011, 06:53 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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They're good at least for a couple of weeks.
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Old 03-28-2011, 07:15 AM
 
Location: Charlotte county, Florida
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Generally, hard-boiled eggs can last a week in the refrigerator. Even with its natural (but easily cracked) calcium-carbonate container.
A hard-cooked egg is a perishable food, so it shouldn't be kept at room temperature for more than two hours.
Interestingly, hard-boiled eggs do not keep nearly as long as raw eggs, which can last three to five weeks in the refrigerator.
There is a good reason for this. When a hen lays an egg, it puts a naturally protective coating on the outside of the shell.
The bad news is, during the washing and sanitizing process before packaging, eggs lose that coating.
But the good news is, processors replace it with a tasteless, natural mineral oil coating.
However, that coating is removed when you hard-boil the egg. So, even if the egg's shell remains uncracked,
it still is slightly porous and, without the coating, is more exposed to the elements.

Source- Netwellness.org
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Old 03-28-2011, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
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Tried to rep you Caligula. Wow, who knew? I would've thought they'd last just as long as a raw egg. I stand corrected.
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Old 03-28-2011, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Heading to the NW, 4 sure.
4,470 posts, read 6,613,838 times
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Default wow

Quote:
Originally Posted by Caligula1 View Post
Generally, hard-boiled eggs can last a week in the refrigerator. Even with its natural (but easily cracked) calcium-carbonate container.
A hard-cooked egg is a perishable food, so it shouldn't be kept at room temperature for more than two hours.
Interestingly, hard-boiled eggs do not keep nearly as long as raw eggs, which can last three to five weeks in the refrigerator.
There is a good reason for this. When a hen lays an egg, it puts a naturally protective coating on the outside of the shell.
The bad news is, during the washing and sanitizing process before packaging, eggs lose that coating.
But the good news is, processors replace it with a tasteless, natural mineral oil coating.
However, that coating is removed when you hard-boil the egg. So, even if the egg's shell remains uncracked,
it still is slightly porous and, without the coating, is more exposed to the elements.

Source- Netwellness.org
Thank's for info..
I think this is an interesting subject.
And also: after they(the eggs) are peeled and vac packed how long are they good.

Like those you get at some Hotel's'/motels. etc.

a Very highly perisable food.

Let's try and get this subject going.

hW
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Old 03-29-2011, 04:37 AM
 
Location: Charlotte county, Florida
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I looked all over for The shelf life of a pre-packaged hard boiled egg. I worked in a BBQ place years ago and their salad bar eggs came in a 5 gallon bucket.
They were soaking in I dont know if it was a brine of sorts or just plain water.
Never did try one because the thought of eating a hardboiled egg floating in some unknown liquid sort of grossed me out..

I have a few buddys that work for Sysco and Roma foods I'll try to call later and see if they can help..
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Old 03-29-2011, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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They are good until they feel slimy to the touch after you peel them. How many days that is depends on a half a dozen factors, most of which you can't really control. An egg that is not safe to eat will find a very convincing way to let you know, before you eat it.
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Old 03-30-2011, 06:37 AM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
4,883 posts, read 7,118,343 times
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They'll last a good long time once they're boiled. My grandmother used to pickle eggs (my dad's from Scotland) which sounds weird but actually tastes pretty good plus it preserves the hard boiled egg indefinitely. Very useful if you grew up on a farm like my grandparents and frequently found you had more eggs then you could eat or sell. I also like to make Chinese tea flavored eggs which are very easy to make but are a nice twist to the old hard boiled egg.
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Old 03-30-2011, 02:15 PM
 
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So, the next question is...when the dye seeps into the eggs...are they okay to eat? Do you like the purple eggs, or the blue ones? My kids..the more garish the better. They are just crazy for dying Easter eggs...
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Old 03-31-2011, 05:07 AM
 
Location: Charlotte county, Florida
4,102 posts, read 4,993,638 times
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Is the dye safe to ingest?
Check the package. Most dyes in children’s kits are vegetable dyes and are safe.
However, some kits are meant to be used on blown-out eggs, and the decorative materials (such as sprinkles) aren’t intended for consumption.
If you use food coloring, of course, that’s also edible.
If the dye is edible, it’s okay to eat the eggs even if, when peeled, you note that some color has leaked unto the egg white.


I'm still working on the pre-cooked, pre packaged eggs.
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