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Old 09-13-2011, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
50,066 posts, read 42,427,133 times
Reputation: 21600

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Quote:
Originally Posted by B4U View Post
That's a good thing to know that kids seem to have lost in their techno world. No face to face contact. And even when they're with their "buds" they're still texting who knows who.
excellant point. My husband and I were talking about the very same thing at breakfast a few days ago and my daughter and I as well. We have become way too dependent on Tech and have forgotten the importance of true communication..

Nita
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Old 09-13-2011, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Middle America
18,201 posts, read 15,658,532 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
A few points:

With as many kids getting out of high school unable to read or perform basic arithmetic, do we really need a lot of other subjects distracting them?
Basic life skills are just as necessary for success (and, any teacher worth is or her salt can and will use life skills TO TEACH basic reading and arithemetic. As a special education teacher, this is PRECISELY HOW we teach basic reading and math skills to those with skill deficiencies in those areas...by embedding them into functional activities that increase our students' independence, using tasks that are meaningful to them. Students will need to use basic reading and arithmetic to do something as simple as following a recipe and measuring ingredients. It's not as if basic skills teaching doesn't occur concurrently with the teaching of life skills.


Quote:
Personally, I would like to see a few classes on personal finance.
Consumer economics were embedded into the home ec classes I was exposed to...it wasn't just cooking. There is definitely a need for personal finance exposure for most students, just as there is a marked need for basic life skills overall.
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Old 09-13-2011, 09:30 AM
 
4,479 posts, read 6,100,775 times
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Guess we're lucky that our son's high school still have a huge amount of elective courses to choose from. There is a Food Science 1 and 2 - a course he's tried to get into but has never been able to.

He has taken a Personal Finance course and next semester he'll take a Living on Your Own course.
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Old 09-13-2011, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
50,066 posts, read 42,427,133 times
Reputation: 21600
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkcoop View Post
Guess we're lucky that our son's high school still have a huge amount of elective courses to choose from. There is a Food Science 1 and 2 - a course he's tried to get into but has never been able to.

He has taken a Personal Finance course and next semester he'll take a Living on Your Own course.
sounds like your school district understands the need for a variety of classes.

Nita
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Old 09-13-2011, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Susquehanna River, Union Co, PA
885 posts, read 754,781 times
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The food electives in many HSs here are oriented toward baking and making brand name recipes. Useful for kitchen skills, poor for nutrition. My child has never seen a piece of meat in a school classroom.

There are more options for sewing in our HS; that's still a recognized skill in our area & the mennonites & Amish here still make their own clothing so it's part of our local economy.
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Old 09-13-2011, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Bangor Maine
3,439 posts, read 3,206,944 times
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jlawrence - I doubt that taking a foods class on how to choose and prepare healthy meals would be a distraction. Healthy meals will help us to stay healthy. Not knowing how to do this is certainly a lack of education.
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Old 09-13-2011, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Middle America
18,201 posts, read 15,658,532 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jkcoop View Post
Guess we're lucky that our son's high school still have a huge amount of elective courses to choose from. There is a Food Science 1 and 2 - a course he's tried to get into but has never been able to.

He has taken a Personal Finance course and next semester he'll take a Living on Your Own course.
Useful electives, for sure. You're fortunate to be in a system that hasn't done away with them, at this point.
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Old 09-13-2011, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Middle America
18,201 posts, read 15,658,532 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newdaawn View Post
jlawrence - I doubt that taking a foods class on how to choose and prepare healthy meals would be a distraction. Healthy meals will help us to stay healthy. Not knowing how to do this is certainly a lack of education.
And, of course, deficits in basic math and reading, if they exist, would be able to be addressed by the activities of the class.
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Old 09-13-2011, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Clayton, MO
1,159 posts, read 700,081 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
If school does not teach, parents should. But many parents gave up cooking, for whatever reason...
I agree. Its great for schools to incorporate home economics into their curriculum, however, I believe its ultimately up to the parent/s or caregivers to demonstrate at home. Cooking and nutrition are invaluable lessons to learn early, in my opinion.

If the schools continue with these classes, I'd stress that budgeting finances and learning early about credit and self sufficiency is certainly valuable.
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Old 09-13-2011, 02:37 PM
 
10,464 posts, read 7,528,148 times
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I was in Junior High in the late 80s and I remember taking some sort of Home Ec class, but we weren't allowed to do much. It was focused on cleanliness (we had our hands and finger nails inspected) and food safety. The only thing we made one day was Rice Krispy treats, and those are so simple it was really unnecessary. It was also an elective, not mandatory.

I don't think our area offers it anymore in middle school, but you can take the classes in HS as an elective.
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