U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-09-2011, 11:16 AM
 
6,400 posts, read 6,512,835 times
Reputation: 9803

Advertisements

Try this - make a nice pot of spaghetti sauce. With or without meat; it works both ways. Then divide it up into say, 4 portions. Refrigerate one, freeze two, eat one tonight.

One meal - sauce with pasta and a salad.
Next meal - sauce with browned Italian sausage and veggies (I use sauteed onion, chopped eggplant and zucchini). Simmer them together until the veggies are done.

The two in the freezer can be for pasta again, lasagne, whatever. This is a way to cook in bulk without having what feels like leftovers. It's meal planning and frugal cooking while still having some variety.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-09-2011, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
21,512 posts, read 22,756,362 times
Reputation: 45298
Quote:
Originally Posted by redlipsticklola View Post
OP, I am single and I live alone too. You got some pretty good suggestions already. Basically what I do is similar. I'm not picky about eating the same thing for dinner 3 nights in a row, LOL. So that's what I will do.
I cook just so I can have leftovers, so the not wanting to eat food that I ate yesterday thing is foreign to me. Basically, it's just planning, and if you make enough chili on Sunday to last you for a few days (not counting the portions that you froze for later) then you don't even have to think about "what's for dinner?" Get home, pop it in the microwave, get on with your life.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2011, 04:02 PM
 
Location: NJ
22,763 posts, read 28,631,495 times
Reputation: 14658
if making a meal at home is costing you more than an equivalent meal in a restaurant you are doing something very wrong.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2011, 04:10 PM
 
9,473 posts, read 15,054,837 times
Reputation: 15451
Part of the problem of cooking in for a single person is the waste. If you cook economically, you end up with leftovers you can't finish before they spoil. If you cook conveniently, you consume things in small quantities that end up costing you about as much as just picking up something.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2011, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,671,678 times
Reputation: 35889
Quote:
Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
OP, it sounds as if you really dont know how to cook, if you bother to really learn, you will see that the difference is enormous.
Perhaps there is somewhere in your area to take some basic cooking classes?
Or ask your grandmother.

Or look here for some ideas:
How did you learn to cook?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2011, 04:23 PM
 
14,668 posts, read 29,757,556 times
Reputation: 17293
OK, I'm posting again, because if I were living alone I would probably eat out a whole lot more than we do now. I also would eat more of the convenience (frozen foods dinners/pizzas) also. It's just not that much fun to cook for one, and I agree there will always be some waste with only one person. Of course it all depends on one's budget, too.

OP, for sure it is cheaper to cook and eat at home with few exceptions. But if you can afford to eat out and enjoy doing so, then why not? Some here are on strict budgets and need to be frugal. You being single, can look at it as part feeding yourself and part "entertainment." So as long as you are eating a healthy balanced diet while eating out, I don't see the harm.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2011, 04:41 PM
 
2,871 posts, read 4,465,595 times
Reputation: 3554
I agree with gypsychic. Whatever floats ya! That was me many moons ago too!

Still, I'd offer one tip. If you're in Arizona then grilling year-round is feasible. And there's nothing to me more satisfying than grilling. Also, in hot weather I am more inclined to appreciate cold foods. You grill a steak for eating a la minute, and you grill a steak for chilling. It's not leftovers; it's meant for later preparations like cold beef salads or sandwiches. Same with chicken, seafood, vegetables (like for roasted salsa), whatever.

The big change for me came not when I could no longer afford it--though that happened too--but when local restaurants didn't offer what I wanted to eat. There was a sandwich I had at a winery once that I could only reproduce at home, or do a 4-hour drive. Or a rich war wonton soup, which does vary in quality, and if you have few ethnic options in the first place, then you're outta luck. Once you run through the menus at your regular spots, that's what happens next...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2011, 04:53 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
8,738 posts, read 9,597,561 times
Reputation: 7507
Quote:
Originally Posted by fleetiebelle View Post
I cook just so I can have leftovers, so the not wanting to eat food that I ate yesterday thing is foreign to me. Basically, it's just planning, and if you make enough chili on Sunday to last you for a few days (not counting the portions that you froze for later) then you don't even have to think about "what's for dinner?" Get home, pop it in the microwave, get on with your life.
exactly! this seems like the most efficient way to go about 'cooking for one.' I personally love leftovers too. I don't know what those people that can't stand eating the same thing 2 nights in a row do
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2011, 05:14 PM
 
Location: California Mountains
1,448 posts, read 2,498,158 times
Reputation: 2331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ol' Wanderer View Post
There is no way on earth that eating out is less expensive, or even equal the cost of eating in.
I take that back. There are places on earth that eating out is less expensive than, or equal to cooking in. There were the 3.5 years I lived alone in Italy when I ate out 25% of the time, but my eating out consisted often of pizza by the slice/square, the weight, or by the amount one wants to spend.

For $2.50, I could have two good size squares, each of a different topping (not meat, meat costs more.) That, plus a vegetable or salad from home would last me a meal and a late night snack. If you could find a similar place with similar cost in AZ, then cooking would not be needed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2011, 07:30 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 34,697,842 times
Reputation: 20198
You can cook for one very nicely without having to "endure" leftovers. Your pound of meat...instead of buying just one pound, buy three pounds. You'll pay less per pound if you get it in bulk.

Make 12 balls of meat, close to evenly sized, with the three pounds. That's 1/4 pound each. Then flatten one ball at a time, on its own individually-cut square of glad/saran wrap. Then fold the plastic wrap over each flattened ball (it'll be thicker than a burger patty but flatter than a meatball).

Now you have 12 individual 1/4 pound meat clumps. Freeze 9 of them; put 2 in the fridge, cook dinner with 1.

Meal #1: You need 1/4 of a cleaned out green pepper chopped into nibble-sized pieces, 1/2 of a single shallot sliced wafer thin, and 4 button mushrooms, washed and sliced, and 2 slices of tomato, diced. Sautee the veggies and shrooms in a teaspoon of butter and another teaspoon of olive oil. Crack some pepper over it when it all starts to sizzle and the shallot is see-through. Crumble the meat into the frying pan, cook it all til it's burger-meated (my term, feel free to use it). Add a dash of tobasco sauce, give it a good stir, toss on a plate. Nuke a potato and serve all this together.

Lunch the next afternoon: sautee the other half of the shallot, and some more washed, sliced mushrooms. Crack a couple of eggs in a bowl, add enough water to fill two halves of those eggshells. Crack some pepper into the egg, pour it into the frying pan over the shallot and mushrooms. When it gets dry around the edges and starts bubbling in the middle, flip the egg over, add a slice of swiss cheese, fold it onto a plate.

That night's supper: swiss cheese and mushroom burger.

Next day's lunch: go to the supermarket salad bar on the way home from work; pick up just enough romaine and mesclun lettuce to serve one big huge salad. Add a palmful of croutons, some sunflower seeds, some sliced cooked chicken breast (those salad bars always have cooked sliced chicken breast) and a half dozen calamata olives. When you get home, chop up the rest of that green pepper and some more mushrooms, toss those in the salad bowl along with a bunch of those cherry tomatos you bought a few days earlier. Oil and lemon juice for this salad - have a slice of that amazing swiss cheese on the side (not in the salad with lemon juice - it'll putrify).

Hopefully you get the idea - you can do this indefinitely. Buy some boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut them into individual sized servings, freeze each one in its own ziplock bag.

Fish is a little different; if you buy it from the supermarket, make sure to ask them if it's already been frozen and thawed. You should only freeze fish if you're buying it already frozen, OR if you're buying it fresh. Thawed fish cannot be refrozen and re-thawed safely. For this reason alone, I recommend buying frozen shrimp, never unfrozen shrimp unless you're getting it off the dock. You can cook single-serve fish in the broiler of your toaster oven; just remember to line the broiling pan with tin foil for easy cleanup. Sprinkle with lemon juice and a capful of white wine and you'll have a simple, tasty main dish.

You can buy individually wrapped nukeable white and sweet potatoes; they're only a dime or so more per pound than buying them "by the pound" and they come already washed, which is a bonus.

Buy frozen brocolli, no sauce - you can thaw out however much you want that meal if you like it raw, or you can steam it or stir-fry. Add a splash of soy sauce and a minced garlic clove for a neat treat.

If you buy frozen (NOT canned) veggies, you'll get the nutritional value, plus you can cook "fresh" with each meal. Just remember to close the bag tightly before putting it back in the freezer so it doesn't collect crystals and get freezerburn.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top