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Old 03-07-2012, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Toronto
3,338 posts, read 5,536,761 times
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Not really a criticism but since my preferences run in the other way (where I really only like meat/fish that is strong or gamey), I have wondered why it seems in much of American culture (of course not all), I find that people try to go for meat that "tastes like chicken" like the joke says.

Often gamey, organ meats, fatty, dark is avoided etc. Even when it comes to fish, the "white fillet" types of fish are sometimes seen as ideal versus the "fishy- or gamey- tasting" types like say herring or mackerel.

I know many other cultures are the opposite and think that those strong-tasting meats or meat parts, whether savory, salty, are seen the most desirable ones (I'm not even necessarily talking exotic meats but even fatty cuts, dark meat etc. seen avoided versus whiter, blander meats) and much tastier.

I wonder why is it?

Why is "tastes like chicken" seen as actually the most preferable taste?

Note: I'm not judging or saying it isn't a good thing or not, I'm just wondering why there's a trend in our culture to go for that style.
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:04 AM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
25,907 posts, read 34,973,454 times
Reputation: 42369
My guess is either family influence as a child (fish is gross, fried things are better, everything needs gravy, etc.) or cultural/hereditary influences arising from an aversion to certain meats due to spoilage or something like that.
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:07 AM
 
3,974 posts, read 5,532,423 times
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America doesn't really have its own culture. It is simply an amalgam of many other cultures. In the cosmopolitan urban centers, the desire to be "adventurous" is strong because there is much more ethnic influence and, therefore, much more culinary diversity.

Basically, where dining is concerned, many of the cities in America are little more than modern cowtowns where menus emulate the local fast food drive-thru -- it's either beef or chicken.
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
10,119 posts, read 16,716,797 times
Reputation: 24610
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleveland_Collector View Post
America doesn't really have its own culture. It is simply an amalgam of many other cultures. In the cosmopolitan urban centers, the desire to be "adventurous" is strong because there is much more ethnic influence and, therefore, much more culinary diversity.

Basically, where dining is concerned, many of the cities in America are little more than modern cowtowns where menus emulate the local fast food drive-thru -- it's either beef or chicken.
This really reminds me of the opening scene of Parenthood when he tells the usher at the ballgame "You don't even really exist. You're an amalgam."

However, I would beg to differ that a culture made up of other cultures over the years is not a culture.

As for the OP, I don't know the answer.. perhaps adventurous eaters have less kids than the picky?
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:33 AM
 
2,401 posts, read 3,805,737 times
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& hence the "losing out" on a broader brand of food exposure & spectrum...

What good is a chef who is trying to cook Thai when he/she has peanut allergies, hence an adversion to peanuts never knowing what is best to use with it to get the taste perfect????

What good is that chef who would never eat meat & entered a BBQ competition where meat is that key ingredient???? How in touch will that chef be when it comes to how that meat (say rib) is prepped & procedure done??? Will their brisket be as tough as nails since they have no knowledge on how to cook it.... or even with the knowledge, have no practice to even cook it in that fist place???

I believe in order to be at the top of their game in foods.... that someone has to be like Morimoto... whom whatever challenges is thrown at them, due to their food passion knows no boundary to savor any types of foods.
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Old 03-07-2012, 12:21 PM
Status: "In an Involuntary Time Warp" (set 23 days ago)
 
7,843 posts, read 10,147,526 times
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I have no taste for any meat and have given up beef and pork. Seems like the less you eat something the less you want it. Even poultry can be weird to my senses, but my husband won't go that far to give them up, too.
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Old 03-07-2012, 12:23 PM
 
3,595 posts, read 3,574,424 times
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Because people have been raised since infancy on highly processed, highly mechanized raised forms of food. When they try meat that comes from an animal that actually is supposed to eat what it is supposed to eat and lives how it is supposed to live they are shocked at how it tastes. 99% of meats (and even produce) in our grocery stores come from livestock specifically bred and raised to fatten up as much as possible and as quickly as possible with little regard for taste. The beef you eat most likely came from cows penned up with little room to move and on a steady diet of corn (not grass which is what cows are supposed to eat), the chicken you eat comes from the same breed of chicken that is raised on corn and grown in cages where they can barely even move. How you raise and feed livestock as well as the types of breed all have a significant impact on the flavor. Most of the livestock we eat are only come from 1 or 2 breeds.
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Old 03-07-2012, 12:27 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
33,555 posts, read 51,767,813 times
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I don't know about others but I prefer strong/gamey meat/fish. Those are my first choice to buy and cook, or order in a restaurant.
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Old 03-07-2012, 12:30 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
33,555 posts, read 51,767,813 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fibonacci View Post
When they try meat that comes from an animal that actually is supposed to eat what it is supposed to eat and lives how it is supposed to live they are shocked at how it tastes.
Is a bit off topic but I met adults, some in a rip age that were shocked to discover that some eggs come in a brown shell...
Many people just don't know anymore how raw food looks like. All they eat is in cans, jars or frozen ready to eat trays.
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Old 03-07-2012, 12:48 PM
 
653 posts, read 697,718 times
Reputation: 408
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
Not really a criticism but since my preferences run in the other way (where I really only like meat/fish that is strong or gamey), I have wondered why it seems in much of American culture (of course not all), I find that people try to go for meat that "tastes like chicken" like the joke says.

Often gamey, organ meats, fatty, dark is avoided etc. Even when it comes to fish, the "white fillet" types of fish are sometimes seen as ideal versus the "fishy- or gamey- tasting" types like say herring or mackerel.

I know many other cultures are the opposite and think that those strong-tasting meats or meat parts, whether savory, salty, are seen the most desirable ones (I'm not even necessarily talking exotic meats but even fatty cuts, dark meat etc. seen avoided versus whiter, blander meats) and much tastier.

I wonder why is it?

Why is "tastes like chicken" seen as actually the most preferable taste?

Note: I'm not judging or saying it isn't a good thing or not, I'm just wondering why there's a trend in our culture to go for that style.
I don't care for any meat (bland or not), but my guess is that the more bland meat appeals to more people for the same reason that more bland vegetables, nut milks, etc appeal to more people:

#1 Since they're bland, they agree with more palates

#2 Since they're bland, they can be used in so many more recipes since you can more easily spice them six ways from the sun
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