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Old 07-04-2012, 11:13 AM
 
25,631 posts, read 29,117,065 times
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Only use bleach if you are trying to sterilze something not just disinfect, and is really only meant for hard solid surfaces, which plastic is not. For food containers just soap and hot water. This takes care of about 80-85 percent of the nasty microbes by rinsing them away. Then if you are really concerned you can use a white vingar solution to remove upto 98% of the nasties. I usually mix mine at 1:1 for disinfecting. I also found a 6% vinegar solution, most available is 5%, that is a cleaning monster. That extra 1% makes a huge diffence especially at full strength. The 6% is working great for killing weeds as well.
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Old 07-04-2012, 11:21 AM
 
13,710 posts, read 22,832,449 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by patrinka View Post
I think everyone has given good advice, soap and water should do the trick or a soak in a bleach solution and then a thorough washing. I don't think you should mix bleach and some dish washing liquids as there can be a chemical reaction. Bleach is an excellent disinfectant but you really should be careful about mixing it with other chemicals. If the smell of bleach offends you they do now have scented bleaches that aren't as offensive. A mix of 10/90 bleach and water in a spray bottle is a cheap and effective anti bacterial wipe but as with every other cleaning supply label it well and keep stored where little ones can't get at it.

The real problem occurs when you mix bleach with ANY ammonia based product. The mixture of bleach and ammonia yields chlorine gas which is toxic.

When I ran a commercial kitchen, I would NOT purchase ANY product containing ammonia as there was a tendency for employees to MIX chemicals.

For the record, most health departments require a sanitizing rinse in the third sink. Usually, these substances are a chlorine or bromine-based rinse.
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Old 07-04-2012, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,297 posts, read 79,469,982 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
The real problem occurs when you mix bleach with ANY ammonia based product. The mixture of bleach and ammonia yields chlorine gas which is toxic.

When I ran a commercial kitchen, I would NOT purchase ANY product containing ammonia as there was a tendency for employees to MIX chemicals.

For the record, most health departments require a sanitizing rinse in the third sink. Usually, these substances are a chlorine or bromine-based rinse.
I actually scrubbed the kitchen floor with a combo of bleach and ammonia when I hadn't been married more than a few years. I was taking care of my girlfriends little boy at the time an we had a 1 year old. Thank God I didn't kill any of us or even damage us;; what a stupid thing, but I just though it would get the old floor really clean..Needless to say, I never did that again...
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Old 07-04-2012, 12:06 PM
 
Location: in my mind
4,615 posts, read 6,118,415 times
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This thread makes me think of a woman I used to know.
I spent a Thanksgiving with her and her family.
At the end of the night, long after we had eaten, and it was time for bed, I asked if someone was going to put the Turkey in the fridge.

She said, "we never do, we just leave it on the counter overnight. None of us have ever gotten sick from it."

Sure enough, the next day, they were all picking off the turkey, which had been left out on the counter overnight, making sandwiches, etc. I couldn't believe it!!

The temperature where we were was probably no higher than 50 during the day, and perhaps the mid-30's at night. Maybe that was cool enough to keep it from going bad? I don't know. I wouldn't touch the stuff.
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Old 07-05-2012, 04:59 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,297 posts, read 79,469,982 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KittenSparkles View Post
This thread makes me think of a woman I used to know.
I spent a Thanksgiving with her and her family.
At the end of the night, long after we had eaten, and it was time for bed, I asked if someone was going to put the Turkey in the fridge.

She said, "we never do, we just leave it on the counter overnight. None of us have ever gotten sick from it."

Sure enough, the next day, they were all picking off the turkey, which had been left out on the counter overnight, making sandwiches, etc. I couldn't believe it!!

The temperature where we were was probably no higher than 50 during the day, and perhaps the mid-30's at night. Maybe that was cool enough to keep it from going bad? I don't know. I wouldn't touch the stuff.
I can relate to that: most of you do not remember growing up with refridgerators that were 14 ft or so at the largest and families consisted of mom, dad and 3, 4 or 5 kids. We just didn't have room to put the turkey away. We stuck it back in the oven, especially if we had an electric oven with no pilot to worry about. We would eat the turkey the next day and then carve it up. We also stuffed it the night before, none of this worrying about getting sick. I might add, for those who even had cutting boards, they were built in under the counter and called bread boards. We certainly never bleached them. In fact we probably didn't even use really hot water to clean them, just wiped them off wiht dish cloth, known as a dish rag. Sure, we got 24 hour flu once in awhile: maybe every 4 or 5 years and what do you bet it was food poisoning but we all survived...Today none of us would think about keeping our food the way we did then. We lived in So Ca where the weather wasn't even cool...I know others who lived in colder climates that used the outdoors as a fridge...I wonder what my grandkids and great grandkids would say if I told them these stories. Of course my kids have heard them many times.
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Old 07-05-2012, 07:09 AM
 
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I clean the containers with real hot soapy water and scrub it good..and have had no problems.
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Old 07-05-2012, 02:57 PM
 
76 posts, read 58,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
I can relate to that: most of you do not remember growing up with refridgerators that were 14 ft or so at the largest and families consisted of mom, dad and 3, 4 or 5 kids. We just didn't have room to put the turkey away. We stuck it back in the oven, especially if we had an electric oven with no pilot to worry about. We would eat the turkey the next day and then carve it up. We also stuffed it the night before, none of this worrying about getting sick. I might add, for those who even had cutting boards, they were built in under the counter and called bread boards. We certainly never bleached them. In fact we probably didn't even use really hot water to clean them, just wiped them off wiht dish cloth, known as a dish rag. Sure, we got 24 hour flu once in awhile: maybe every 4 or 5 years and what do you bet it was food poisoning but we all survived...Today none of us would think about keeping our food the way we did then. We lived in So Ca where the weather wasn't even cool...I know others who lived in colder climates that used the outdoors as a fridge...I wonder what my grandkids and great grandkids would say if I told them these stories. Of course my kids have heard them many times.
My mom told me that when she and my Dad were first married he built a sort of box that fit into a window and that was where they kept their milk and meat in the winter. She said in summer the ice man would deliver blocks of ice to fit in the ice box. No refrigerators then - we should count our blessings.

I think if you are eating the meat you had in the plastic storage containers you really shouldn't obsess on the containers. Humans do not live in sterile environments.
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Old 07-05-2012, 03:01 PM
 
29,988 posts, read 35,855,551 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KittenSparkles View Post
ok thanks

they are cheap enough that I could toss them when I am done, but I like to re-use stuff as much as possible
If you have concern re-use them for something other than food storage after the first use. Or, just cook the meat before freezing.
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Old 07-05-2012, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,556,197 times
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Bleach is a very powerful agent, and an almost imperceptible amount of it will kill just about anything. A couple of tablespoons of bleach in a gallon or two of water, and a half an hour in there, even at room temperature, will make anything safe. No need to scrub or boil anything. South American housewives put their fresh fruits and vegetables in there, and never have to worry about any organisms that might be on the food.

You can put a little bleach in a bucket of river water, and wait 12 hours for most of the taste and smell to dissipate and evaporate off, and it will be safe to drink.
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Old 07-06-2012, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,297 posts, read 79,469,982 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by patrinka View Post
My mom told me that when she and my Dad were first married he built a sort of box that fit into a window and that was where they kept their milk and meat in the winter. She said in summer the ice man would deliver blocks of ice to fit in the ice box. No refrigerators then - we should count our blessings.

I think if you are eating the meat you had in the plastic storage containers you really shouldn't obsess on the containers. Humans do not live in sterile environments.
your mom must be from my generation or close. You are right about the sterile enviornment, in fact we are better with a few germs, outherwise or so I have been told our systems will not tolerate any germs and we will have very little resistance.

Nita
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