U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-31-2012, 03:46 PM
 
1,357 posts, read 782,668 times
Reputation: 685
Default FYI not all proteins are the same

people always talking about protein. Sorry guys, not all proteins are the same. Proteins are made up of 20 different amino acids. Your body is incapable of producing 9 of them, must get from diet. These are called the essential amino acids. The rest the body can make from one of the other amino acids.

A protein that has a good ratio of all 9 essentials is called a complete protein. A p[rotein that has a good amount of half the essentials is an incomplete protein.

Animal based proteins usually are complete proteins. This includes:
-Eggs
-cheese
-meats
-seafood
-dairy
-etc.

Eggs especially are the best protein around, because they are DESIGNED to be food for the egg. Both the yolk and the white.

Grains and beans and nuts are incomplete proteins (not to mention they don't have that much protein in them). However, grains and beans/legumes together make a complete protein. And nuts and grains together make a complete protein. Beans and nuts together don't complement into a complete protein so well. And also, it's weird, but peanuts are actually beans/legumes for these purposes (peanuts are legumes, taxonomically speaking)

Interestingly, this mix is sort of how humans survived and thrived through agriculture. In the field, the beans/legumes fix nitrogen to help the grain grow next year, i.e. crop rotation. And together, both the grains and beans form a complete protein. You'll be able to go a long time on just the two, since protein, besides straight calories, is one of the biggest things the body needs. This explains traditional dishes like succotash or beans and rice, mixes of grains and legumes.

So just the amount of "protein" you get might not mean to much. Yeah, nuts are high in "protein", as are oats and beans. But they don't compare to animal based proteins. You need to mix non-animal protein sources.

Furhtermore, this means that soybean protein, like in many protein powders, ain't that great. Whey is better, of course.
Hell, I once saw this vial claiming to have 50 grams protein. I looked at the ingredients and it said as the biggest ingredient collagen and skin protein isolate. Yeah right. Yeah, that's technically protein, but it's the least valuable kind by far. Skin and hoof and hair etc. protein is the least valuable, which is how we can afford to make so much of it (see how much skin and hair you have?) This also means pork rinds don't haver that much useful protein either.

And yet more to chew on, a lot of plants that seem to have very good protein amino acid profiles, namely quinoa, amaranth, and soybean, actually have something that blocks all their nutrition from being absorbed. They're not sure what it is yet, but too much in the diet of mice can poison them or slowly malnurish them. Oats don't have this problem.

So there it is.

This makes me wonder about the 1/g protein per pound bodyweight lean mass for bodybuilders claim. What kind of protein? Does that all have to be complete protein?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-03-2012, 04:09 AM
 
2 posts, read 997 times
Reputation: 13
Thanks for sharing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-03-2012, 07:55 AM
 
7,010 posts, read 8,924,207 times
Reputation: 6033
Interesting stuff. You should mention people should cater to their personal needs. For example, someone with high cholesterol is not going to want to eat a lot of eggs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-06-2012, 09:55 PM
 
3,804 posts, read 2,453,434 times
Reputation: 2493
So.......why did you post this in exercise & fitness? it seems a better location would be food since you didn't indicate the relationship of protein to exercise.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2012, 02:32 PM
 
1,357 posts, read 782,668 times
Reputation: 685
*and by "blocks all their nutrition from being absorbed", I don't mean that none of the nutrition is absorbed, just that far less of it is than would be with normal foods.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2012, 09:00 PM
 
1,470 posts, read 379,369 times
Reputation: 584
Informative...

I already eat all those, though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-13-2012, 10:12 AM
Status: "Give just a little of yourself to others." (set 11 days ago)
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
48,927 posts, read 40,295,542 times
Reputation: 20644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peanuttree View Post
people always talking about protein. Sorry guys, not all proteins are the same. Proteins are made up of 20 different amino acids. Your body is incapable of producing 9 of them, must get from diet. These are called the essential amino acids. The rest the body can make from one of the other amino acids.

A protein that has a good ratio of all 9 essentials is called a complete protein. A p[rotein that has a good amount of half the essentials is an incomplete protein.

Animal based proteins usually are complete proteins. This includes:
-Eggs
-cheese
-meats
-seafood
-dairy
-etc.

Eggs especially are the best protein around, because they are DESIGNED to be food for the egg. Both the yolk and the white.

Grains and beans and nuts are incomplete proteins (not to mention they don't have that much protein in them). However, grains and beans/legumes together make a complete protein. And nuts and grains together make a complete protein. Beans and nuts together don't complement into a complete protein so well. And also, it's weird, but peanuts are actually beans/legumes for these purposes (peanuts are legumes, taxonomically speaking)

Interestingly, this mix is sort of how humans survived and thrived through agriculture. In the field, the beans/legumes fix nitrogen to help the grain grow next year, i.e. crop rotation. And together, both the grains and beans form a complete protein. You'll be able to go a long time on just the two, since protein, besides straight calories, is one of the biggest things the body needs. This explains traditional dishes like succotash or beans and rice, mixes of grains and legumes.

So just the amount of "protein" you get might not mean to much. Yeah, nuts are high in "protein", as are oats and beans. But they don't compare to animal based proteins. You need to mix non-animal protein sources.

Furhtermore, this means that soybean protein, like in many protein powders, ain't that great. Whey is better, of course.
Hell, I once saw this vial claiming to have 50 grams protein. I looked at the ingredients and it said as the biggest ingredient collagen and skin protein isolate. Yeah right. Yeah, that's technically protein, but it's the least valuable kind by far. Skin and hoof and hair etc. protein is the least valuable, which is how we can afford to make so much of it (see how much skin and hair you have?) This also means pork rinds don't haver that much useful protein either.

And yet more to chew on, a lot of plants that seem to have very good protein amino acid profiles, namely quinoa, amaranth, and soybean, actually have something that blocks all their nutrition from being absorbed. They're not sure what it is yet, but too much in the diet of mice can poison them or slowly malnurish them. Oats don't have this problem.

So there it is.

This makes me wonder about the 1/g protein per pound bodyweight lean mass for bodybuilders claim. What kind of protein? Does that all have to be complete protein?
Amazing, you would bring this up: we were taught this is one of my first nutrition classes in college: it might have actually been our very first, of many. Since then (over 50 years ago) I have hardly heard the referance to "whole proteinien". I am glad to see it talkied about again.

Nita
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-13-2012, 10:14 AM
Status: "Give just a little of yourself to others." (set 11 days ago)
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
48,927 posts, read 40,295,542 times
Reputation: 20644
Quote:
Originally Posted by veuvegirl View Post
Interesting stuff. You should mention people should cater to their personal needs. For example, someone with high cholesterol is not going to want to eat a lot of eggs.
This is only partially true: it depends on what you mean by a lot of, something. Studies are showing, it takes a lot of eggs to really affect cholestrerol, but yes, somethings do need to be watched. Still it is important to get enough whole protein in your diet...I am reading the OPs information as guidelines, not anything set in stone and I thing he/she is simply saying we need a mixture of types of protein; some give us more actual benefits than others.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-13-2012, 10:23 AM
 
1,193 posts, read 1,065,949 times
Reputation: 1755
I am very interested in finding out where you read this info on quinoa. Everything I have read disagrees with what you say.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-13-2012, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Volcano
11,959 posts, read 9,732,647 times
Reputation: 9339
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
Amazing, you would bring this up: we were taught this is one of my first nutrition classes in college: it might have actually been our very first, of many. Since then (over 50 years ago) I have hardly heard the referance to "whole proteinien". I am glad to see it talkied about again.
The terms "whole protein", "complete protein," and "incomplete protein" are considered obsolete today, because they do not correspond to the way the body uses protein, according to the latest research.

In the digestive system all proteins, from whatever source, are broken down into amino acids, which are absorbed into the body. These amino acids are categorized as: essential amino acids, non-essential amino acids and conditional amino acids. From Wikipedia:
"Essential amino acids cannot be made by the body, and must be supplied by food. Non-essential amino acids are made by the body from essential amino acids or in the normal breakdown of proteins. Conditional amino acids are usually not essential, except in times of illness, stress or for someone challenged with a lifelong medical condition.

Essential amino acids are leucine, isoleucine, valine, lysine, threonine, tryptophan, methionine, phenylalanine and histidine. Non-essential amino acids include alanine, asparagine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid. Conditional amino acids include arginine, cysteine, glutamine, glycine, proline, serine, and tyrosine."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protein_(nutrient)

One little detail illustrates the changes in thinking about this from recent research... when we were in college we were taught that when rice and beans were eaten together, it made a complete protein, which is why it is such a popular source of protein around the world.

Today, however, it has been proven that one gets the nutritional benefit of the beans & rice combination even if they are eaten on separate days. The reason is that each is broken down to its component amino acids, which are then absorbed and circulate around in the body until needed to combine with other amino acids in various ways. The critical thing is making sure your body is getting enough of all the different amino acids it needs for good health, regardless of what proteins supply them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top