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Old 09-06-2012, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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is it the kind of beef? the way it is cooked? the region of the country? Well I know you fry country friend steak and it is kind of crusty but is there a difference in beef?
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Old 09-06-2012, 03:41 PM
 
Location: AZ
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Do you mean country "fried" steak? Country fried steak is usually made out of cube steak that is floured and seasoned as if it were fried chicken...yumm.........it's all beef though..
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Old 09-06-2012, 04:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
is it the kind of beef? the way it is cooked? the region of the country? Well I know you fry country friend steak and it is kind of crusty but is there a difference in beef?
Swiss and cube steaks are less tender cuts of the round or sirloin that is mechanically tenderized in order to break down the tough connective tissues. Swiss steaks are generally cube steaks that are cooked with tomatoes that generally also assist in tenderizing the meat.
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Old 09-06-2012, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Volcano
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Cube steak is a prepared cut of beef... a piece of tough meat, often top round, which has been mechanically tenderized with cuts that leave a "cube" pattern on the surface.

Swiss steak, country steak, chicken-fried steak - these are all ways of preparing cube steak.
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Old 09-07-2012, 06:26 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OpenD View Post
Cube steak is a prepared cut of beef... a piece of tough meat, often top round, which has been mechanically tenderized with cuts that leave a "cube" pattern on the surface.

Swiss steak, country steak, chicken-fried steak - these are all ways of preparing cube steak.
Exactly, and it's generally a cheaper cut of meat too, and a fairly thin cut. I usually see it packaged as "beef-round cube steak". Sometimes it can be quite tender, although I've also had some chewy pieces.
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Old 09-07-2012, 05:51 PM
 
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I can sort of take or leave Swiss steak.
Now, for country fried steak with gravy????
I'm all over that....tell me where.
I just had a nice one for breakfast with some eggs last week.
I think Cracker Barrel has top notch country fried steak.....perhaps the best I have had.
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Old 09-08-2012, 06:04 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood, DE and beautiful SXM!
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I haven't made anything with cube steak in years; thanks for reminding me. One of DH's favorite dishes was my cube steak in tomato gravy with onions, peppers, and mushrooms. Maybe tonight for dinner~~I hope I remember how to make it. Thanks.
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Old 09-08-2012, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
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cuke steak is what one uses to make chicken friend or country fried steak: Swiss steak is made with a similar cut of beef but it isn't cubed first. Swiss steak usually, because it is made from the round part of the beef is cooked for several hours in a sause with vegetables. I almost think of it as being similar to a stew; country or chicken fried steak cooks very quickly because, as mentioned it has been tenderized. I just made it a few weeks ago for the first time in years...

Nita
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Old 09-08-2012, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Volcano
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OpenD View Post
Cube steak is a prepared cut of beef... a piece of tough meat, often top round, which has been mechanically tenderized with cuts that leave a "cube" pattern on the surface.
When I visited my grandfather's butcher shop as a kid, I was always fascinated by the tenderizer machine, in which a thick slice of meat would pass between textured rollers and come out the other side much thinner. At that time there was no pre-packaged cube steak. You ordered your meat, then had it tenderized, or did it at home. Today they seem to have moved this machine back to the back, but in Grandpa's day it was right up front where you could watch, and tell the butcher when it had been done enough for your intended use, from just a little bit to almost falling apart and really thin. The latter was used for a variation where the meat was rolled around a stuffing before baking. I haven't had that in years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by andthentherewere3 View Post
Exactly, and it's generally a cheaper cut of meat too, and a fairly thin cut. I usually see it packaged as "beef-round cube steak". Sometimes it can be quite tender, although I've also had some chewy pieces.
Yes, top round is a cheaper cut, and tougher than real steak, which is why you either need to cook it a long time to break it down, or mechanically tenderize it so it cooks faster due to all the heat channels being created through the meat and it becomes more tender due to the shorter, less connected fibers once it's done.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
cuke steak is what one uses to make chicken friend or country fried steak: Swiss steak is made with a similar cut of beef but it isn't cubed first. Swiss steak usually, because it is made from the round part of the beef is cooked for several hours in a sause with vegetables. I almost think of it as being similar to a stew; country or chicken fried steak cooks very quickly because, as mentioned it has been tenderized.
Yes and no. I think it's probably a regional thing, because cube steak was popular where I grew up, but nobody ever cooked it "country" style, while it was commonly cooked "Swiss" style. And around the country I've typically seen Swiss Steak tenderized in some way before cooking, whether by cubing, pounding, or needling. Here's Alton Brown's recipe for Swiss Steak that uses the needling technique. He starts with 1/2" thick slices and reduces them to 1/4" thick before cooking. At home my mother would do the same with a tenderizing hammer... until I got big enough to help.

Swiss Steak Recipe : Alton Brown : Recipes : Food Network

If you are not familiar with the tools, here are some of the needle type tenderizers, which are also work great for speeding up the process of marinating or brining:

Amazon.com: deni 48 blade meat tenderizer

And here are some of the hammer type. We'd always use the flat side for pounding chicken breasts or veal thin, and the textured side for tough cuts of beef or pork.

Amazon.com: meat hammer tenderizer
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Old 09-09-2012, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
77,808 posts, read 94,062,042 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OpenD View Post
When I visited my grandfather's butcher shop as a kid, I was always fascinated by the tenderizer machine, in which a thick slice of meat would pass between textured rollers and come out the other side much thinner. At that time there was no pre-packaged cube steak. You ordered your meat, then had it tenderized, or did it at home. Today they seem to have moved this machine back to the back, but in Grandpa's day it was right up front where you could watch, and tell the butcher when it had been done enough for your intended use, from just a little bit to almost falling apart and really thin. The latter was used for a variation where the meat was rolled around a stuffing before baking. I haven't had that in years.



Yes, top round is a cheaper cut, and tougher than real steak, which is why you either need to cook it a long time to break it down, or mechanically tenderize it so it cooks faster due to all the heat channels being created through the meat and it becomes more tender due to the shorter, less connected fibers once it's done.



Yes and no. I think it's probably a regional thing, because cube steak was popular where I grew up, but nobody ever cooked it "country" style, while it was commonly cooked "Swiss" style. And around the country I've typically seen Swiss Steak tenderized in some way before cooking, whether by cubing, pounding, or needling. Here's Alton Brown's recipe for Swiss Steak that uses the needling technique. He starts with 1/2" thick slices and reduces them to 1/4" thick before cooking. At home my mother would do the same with a tenderizing hammer... until I got big enough to help.

Swiss Steak Recipe : Alton Brown : Recipes : Food Network

If you are not familiar with the tools, here are some of the needle type tenderizers, which are also work great for speeding up the process of marinating or brining:

Amazon.com: deni 48 blade meat tenderizer

And here are some of the hammer type. We'd always use the flat side for pounding chicken breasts or veal thin, and the textured side for tough cuts of beef or pork.

Amazon.com: meat hammer tenderizer
it might be regional or it might be the era. Growing up, we didn't even have cube steak in the stores so we did use reg round steak for both swiss and chicken fried, but we pounded the round steak for chicken fried or country fried: yes we had a hammer type pounder, but dad often just used the knife, being sure not to cut the meat. We left swiss steak the way we purchased it at the butcher shop. Of course I will also add, we never pounded a chicken breast, we cooked them (bone in) either with the entire rest of the chickie or we broiled the breasts. Heck we didn't even have bar b cues until just before I got married. Some people had built in ones in the back yard, but no one had a charcoal one that could be moved from place to place. My mother in law, on the other hand, would have no idea how to pound a piece of meat, she used it thick for both swiss and chicken fried...
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