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Old 10-19-2013, 05:54 AM
 
95 posts, read 331,700 times
Reputation: 109

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I may not be an expert chef but I have been cooking since I was 8 and have never had this problem with eggs. Ever since we moved I have had nothing but problems. Here's some examples:
--the yolk is red (blood red)
--the yolk is a solid mass and does not "run" when broken
--the whites are cloudy and VERY thick
--the whites do not blend (meaning after being added to the mix and stirred the whites form a thick blob that pops to the top of the mix and sits there until I take it out with a fork)

What is up with these eggs?????????

Everything I bake is not properly done because of the eggs. Never seen anything like these in all my days. I buy store brand eggs because they only seel those or egg beaters here.
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Old 10-19-2013, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Volcano
12,971 posts, read 22,648,637 times
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Just a guess, but it sounds like you are getting fresher eggs than you are used to, from a smaller farm. Really fresh egg whites can be milky looking, and have two textures... a thick portion around the yolk, and a thinner portion close to the shell. When you break a really fresh egg into a saucer you can clearly see the thicker portion sitting high, while the thinner portion spreads out. After a few days the white gets clearer and more watery. The fix is to let the eggs age a few days before using them. Also, fresh eggs are harder to peel than older eggs when you hard boil them. My grandmother used to keep her eggs for baking and hard boiling on a pantry shelf - they'll keep for weeks without refrigeration - and the freshest eggs, for grandpas breakfast, on a shelf over the stove.

Blood red yolks are not unusual from real pastured chickens, and are caused by the chickens diet, such as certain berries or bugs, worms. You rarely see them from eggs that come from factory eggeries because their chickens never get to forage outdoors.

I'm curious, where do you live that this is all you can buy?
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Old 10-19-2013, 07:09 AM
 
3,878 posts, read 4,580,575 times
Reputation: 10019
You lucky cook! I would love to get some thick blood red eggs! I'm always excited when I have some of those in my farmer's market eggs. As for whipping the whites, beat your eggs first before incorporating them into the rest of your mix and remove those anchor strands in the whites then (they don't hurt anything; they're there to keep the yolk centered).

Did you know, in Italy, they refer to the yolk as "the red of the egg"? Because a chicken that's foraging bugs and berries and worms and seeds is going to have much more vibrant color in the yolks -- it's also a sign of good, dense nutrients in there.
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Old 10-19-2013, 08:20 AM
 
95 posts, read 331,700 times
Reputation: 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by OpenD View Post
Just a guess, but it sounds like you are getting fresher eggs than you are used to, from a smaller farm. Really fresh egg whites can be milky looking, and have two textures... a thick portion around the yolk, and a thinner portion close to the shell. When you break a really fresh egg into a saucer you can clearly see the thicker portion sitting high, while the thinner portion spreads out. After a few days the white gets clearer and more watery. The fix is to let the eggs age a few days before using them. Also, fresh eggs are harder to peel than older eggs when you hard boil them. My grandmother used to keep her eggs for baking and hard boiling on a pantry shelf - they'll keep for weeks without refrigeration - and the freshest eggs, for grandpas breakfast, on a shelf over the stove.

Blood red yolks are not unusual from real pastured chickens, and are caused by the chickens diet, such as certain berries or bugs, worms. You rarely see them from eggs that come from factory eggeries because their chickens never get to forage outdoors.

I'm curious, where do you live that this is all you can buy?

We just moved to Kansas. Can't do all my shopping at Walmart so have to buy Dillons/Kroger products.
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Old 10-19-2013, 01:00 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
21,025 posts, read 25,829,769 times
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It sounds like you are getting very fresh, free range eggs. Those are better eggs, so nothing to complain about.

Yolk color is determined by the diet of the bird. The darker the yolk, the more healthy the diet.

Yes, they take more effort to blend in because they are very thick. You just need to get used to them.

Your eggs sound like what I get from my extra healthy, well cared for, home raised flock.
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Old 10-19-2013, 01:38 PM
 
25,631 posts, read 29,145,474 times
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Uh those are not your standard mass produced eggs. I suspect you picked a carton of local free range eggs.

My neighbors across the street have lots of chickens at their ranch and your eggs are similar to the ones we get from them.
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Old 10-20-2013, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Somewhere out there
18,102 posts, read 20,069,984 times
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No offense to the OP but I had to giggle reading this thread look how far we've come to losing the attachment of farm freshness. City folks pay $3-$4 per dozen for those "organic" eggs. As the egg ages, the white becomes runny and the yolk becomes much more flat and slightly less yellow. I get farm fresh eggs where the yolks are more orange than yellow.

OP as long as the raw egg doesn't float in water they are fine to eat. Even then some folks use them I don't eggs are to inexpensive to take a chance on using a floating egg.
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Old 10-20-2013, 01:51 PM
 
6,952 posts, read 8,890,782 times
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These eggs are not "fresh" or not "fresh" so much as they are "fertilized." Those are no longer eggs -- they are developing into chicks. Whoever collected them forgot to "candle" them to make sure there were no baby chicks inside.
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Old 10-21-2013, 11:33 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
21,025 posts, read 25,829,769 times
Reputation: 39483
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliffie View Post
These eggs are not "fresh" or not "fresh" so much as they are "fertilized." Those are no longer eggs -- they are developing into chicks. Whoever collected them forgot to "candle" them to make sure there were no baby chicks inside.
Now, I am going to very gently explain to you that the yolk in the eggs never ever turns into a chick.

The yolk is just the "lunch box" of nutrients that a possible embryo will use to feed itself while it grows into a chicken. There is no baby chicken inside OP's breakfast eggs. The color of the yolk is determined by what the hen eats.
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Old 10-21-2013, 11:38 AM
 
7,672 posts, read 9,345,103 times
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Are you whisking them before using them in baking? I don't ever have trouble with them in baking. But I do whisk till frothy to "break" it up.

They also taste amazing in just fried or scrambled. You hardly need seasoning/cheese other than a salt sprinkle. So good.
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