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Old 01-25-2014, 08:43 PM
 
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I am particularly interested in Indian(east Indian) food. It seems their curry dishes are good tasting. I think I like it better than Chinese food. But I would like to learn some ethnic dishes that aren't too complicated. It helps that there is an Indian food store here in town.
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Old 10-04-2018, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Chicago
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Latin American.

Many are corn based and there's really nothing stopping you from cutting up 3-5 veggies w/ a meat of your choice and calling them fajitas.


I find them pretty simple, filling and delicious.

There's not a lot of fermented flavors in Latin American dishes and you can definitely find recipes on either end of the "simple" to "that's a lot of ingredients" spectrum but I find, in general, there aren't many that go into Latin dishes to get out a lot of flavor.
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Old 10-04-2018, 09:04 PM
 
Location: NYC
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Chinese food is very easy to make with the right ingredients but Americanized Chinese food are not that easy because they are usually deep fried or stir fried from hot wok which is completely non-traditional.

Traditional fried rice is easier than mac+cheese. Chinese spring rolls are easier than making Italian manicottis.

Egg drop soup is very easy to make. Most Indian dishes are also very easy if you got the ingredients.
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Old 10-05-2018, 06:25 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ > Raleigh, NC
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Actually, Indian food CAN be easily made at home using prepackaged sauces and spice mixes. There are many types and brands of curries - I find that the best are the ones that are like a chocolate bar with squates . You break off as many as you want. I've forgotten the name right now, but when I return hime, I'll have a look in the pantry.

Prepackaged spice mixes are also readily available and quite good.

Easiest? If say mexican.
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Old 10-05-2018, 08:01 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vision33r View Post
but Americanized Chinese food are not that easy because they are usually deep fried or stir fried from hot wok which is completely non-traditional.
I don't know man I've spent a lot of time in China watching some Auntie stir frying our order in a wok over a burner that resembled the engine in a sidewinder missile. I'm quite skeptical that stir fried in a wok wouldn't be considered traditional in China, in fact in many of the stores there almost all the pots/pans sections is woks.
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Old 10-05-2018, 08:41 AM
 
Location: NoVa
2,039 posts, read 2,779,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nickerman View Post
I am particularly interested in Indian(east Indian) food. It seems their curry dishes are good tasting. I think I like it better than Chinese food. But I would like to learn some ethnic dishes that aren't too complicated. It helps that there is an Indian food store here in town.
Do yourself a favor and go to your nearest Indian grocery store and peruse their spice aisles, specifically ready made spices in a jar or in a box. My favorite brand is 'Shan Masala' from Pakistan, pre-mixed powder spices in a box and each box is for different traditional Indian / Pakistani dishes like Mutton Curry, Chicken Curry, Biryani, etc. Read the directions on the back of the box and buy one with the least complicated directions and the shortest list of ingredients.

Be careful with the heat though, as these pre-mix spices are intended for Indian / Pakistani home cooks, so they don't bother toning it down for western cooks. I would advise to use no more than 1 flat TBS of the spices when cooking it for the first time for less heat (the box will call for more amount of spices than that but ignore it or you'll be sorry!). You still have to buy the fresh ingredients (usually the following: ginger, garlic, onions, tomatoes, sometimes plain yogurt if it's yogurt base curry, and fresh cilantro to throw into the curry just before you turn off the stove). Just follow the directions on the back of the box and you'll be alright. Don't worry about cheating with pre-mix spices. Ask any Indian cook in the US and they'll tell you they cheat too. Few people have time to grind and mix everything from scratch anymore.
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Old 10-05-2018, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Seminole County, FL
7,741 posts, read 5,326,875 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by graceC View Post
Don't worry about cheating with pre-mix spices. Ask any Indian cook in the US and they'll tell you they cheat too. Few people have time to grind and mix everything from scratch anymore.
...About this...
I buy all of the spices separately and then mix and grind them myself. Several reasons for this.

1 - It comes out A LOT cheaper. You can buy a large bag of coriander, for example, that is going to last you possibly 50 uses, for the same price as you'd buy a small bag of pre-mixed curry that might last you 5 uses.

2 - Doesnt take much time at all. I have a large jar at home where I keep spices I mixed up myself (unground), so all I need to do when ready to use it is grind it, which takes a few seconds to a minute, and then use it.

3 - The taste from freshly-ground spices is much stronger.

4 - You can adjust the taste to your liking. Don't like so much cumin? Cut back on it. Too spicy/not spicy? Adjust.


That being said, I do understand the appeal of pre-mixed spices, I just don't have a reason to use them.
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Old 10-05-2018, 09:40 AM
 
Location: NoVa
2,039 posts, read 2,779,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcenal352 View Post
...About this...
I buy all of the spices separately and then mix and grind them myself. Several reasons for this.

1 - It comes out A LOT cheaper. You can buy a large bag of coriander, for example, that is going to last you possibly 50 uses, for the same price as you'd buy a small bag of pre-mixed curry that might last you 5 uses.

2 - Doesnt take much time at all. I have a large jar at home where I keep spices I mixed up myself (unground), so all I need to do when ready to use it is grind it, which takes a few seconds to a minute, and then use it.

3 - The taste from freshly-ground spices is much stronger.

4 - You can adjust the taste to your liking. Don't like so much cumin? Cut back on it. Too spicy/not spicy? Adjust.


That being said, I do understand the appeal of pre-mixed spices, I just don't have a reason to use them.
Good for you. My advise was for the OP who asked for something simple, and a pre-mix can offer that.

I cook Indian food quite often at home and I, too, have jars of individual spices at home, but I only keep the ones I use often. For complicated dish like Biryani, I use pre-mix. Too lazy to hunt down everything just for one dish.
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Old 10-05-2018, 09:54 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
72,664 posts, read 64,140,481 times
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OP, ask your Indian grocer if s/he knows of any Indian cooking classes offered in town.
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Old 10-05-2018, 10:00 AM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
33,555 posts, read 51,767,813 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nickerman View Post
I am particularly interested in Indian(east Indian) food. It seems their curry dishes are good tasting. I think I like it better than Chinese food. But I would like to learn some ethnic dishes that aren't too complicated. It helps that there is an Indian food store here in town.

The Indian restaurant - is that a mom-and-pop style place? If yes, get friendly with those people and ask if they would show you few tricks. I know lots of Indians and they are always thrilled if someone show an interest in their cooking. They might ask you to come when their place isn't busy and observe how they cook. You could offer some (free) hand in helping, just to show your appreciation. I bet it will work out!
You might try other places too...
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