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Old 02-03-2014, 10:25 PM
 
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When i blend juice its too thick how in the heck do you make juice out of juicer more thin like those(Expensive) pre juiced drinks at the store. Its too damn thick when i juice orange juice and most of the fruits and veggies.
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Old 02-03-2014, 10:27 PM
 
Location: South Central Texas
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Add water..... and a little sugar if needed. Are you straining the pulp?
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Old 02-03-2014, 10:34 PM
 
9 posts, read 28,630 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SATX56 View Post
Add water..... and a little sugar if needed. Are you straining the pulp?
Straining the pulp ? with a regular strainer ? i have not tried that and i have not added water. Is there a such thing as a special separator for separating the juice from the pulp or?
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Old 02-03-2014, 10:51 PM
 
Location: South Central Texas
114,036 posts, read 52,353,828 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pickle292 View Post
Straining the pulp ? with a regular strainer ? i have not tried that and i have not added water. Is there a such thing as a special separator for separating the juice from the pulp or?
I'm not really into juicing but do have Bullets and and other processors and blenders. Someone else may know if there's something better than a simple strainer you could use. Are you using a machine or hand type juicer?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KlcRgMxLrWo

^^That's the way I'd do it. There may be a device to force strain it.

Last edited by SATX56; 02-03-2014 at 10:59 PM..
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Old 02-03-2014, 10:58 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
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Dilute with water or other clear/thin juice.
Looks like you need a juicer that will separate the pulp, but keeping some pulp is very beneficial (fiber).
Centrifugal juicers - automatic ejection type are juicers that will separate the pulp and give you a thinner juicer:
Omega Juicer Model 4000 - Discount Prices
Breville Juicer - 6 Models
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Old 02-04-2014, 02:02 AM
 
Location: Volcano
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Default Types of juicers - what's best for orange juice?

Blended "juices" are thick, yes, because they retain all the pulp, which is essentially just the cellulose matrix which holds the juice. What you buy premade in the store is generally not blended, but instead is made in big machines that use centrifugal force or high pressure to separate the juice from all that pulp, which is largely indigestible. If you want something like they make, you have to use their methods.

Before I jump into how juicers work, the one thing you can do with what you have now is to strain the "porridge" you get from a blender. A 4 cup or larger pitcher with a fine mesh food strainer that neatly fits inside the top is a handy accessory for the purpose.

But stick with me... you can make better orange juice, as far as I am concerned, with less fuss and less mess with a juicer made expressly for the purpose, and do it for as little as $5 - 25 or so.

Types of Juicers

I have owned or used pretty much every kind of juicer described, except for the Norwalk Hydraulic Press which costs nearly $2,500.

I currently own and use a Breville Juice Plus centrifugal juicer... great for hard items that are easily grated by the sharp little teeth on its rotating plate, such as apples, carrots, beets, ginger. It's also good with really juicy fruit like pineapple and watermelon. It's fast and easy to use, but has a little less yield than the auger type because of the quick transit time of the ground-up fruit or veggie across the perforated strainer cone. IOW, the ejected pulp is a little wetter from this type of juicer, and it's useless for greens and wheatgrass, but its easy to use and to clean up, and less expensive ($50-150) than the auger type, so it's the most popular kind for general household use.

Juice Fountain Plus JE98XL Juicer | Breville

This evolved from the original "centrifugal basket" type, like the Acme and Omega, which are batch juicers, and are still preferred by some. You can juice about 2 pounds of carrots or apples in one of these, for example, before you have to stop and empty it and clean it before proceeding. The continuous ejection type, with an angled strainer basket, was developed for more convenience, although at the cost of slightly lower juice yield. Perhaps best known is the Acme Juicerator. Waring Professional Juicer by Acme, Model # 6001

I also own and use an Omega 8000 series single auger "masticating" juicer which does an excellent job of juicing spinach, kale, wheatgrass, greens, herbs. It also does a good job with all the foods mentioned above, but it works more slowly. This kind, available in horizontal and vertical models uses a rotating spiral auger to "chew" whatever you put in the feed tube, which generally requires you cut the food into smaller pieces than the centrifugal type. Because of the high pressures developed between the auger and the strainer cone it produces a higher yield and ejects a drier pulp. Double auger types have precision mating steel spirals that can juice pine needles! Interesting fact is that S. Korea leads the world in designing and manufacturing masticating type machines, because of a hundreds year-old tradition of juicing such things as... pine needles... which required very tedious pounding in bif stone mortars, and then squeezing the pulp in a hemp bag to extract the juice, a physically demanding and time consuming process. But the electric machines they developed have proven ideal for western-style health juicing as well. $200-350 for single auger, $450 and up for twin augers. Here's a popular Omega 8000 series single auger...

Omega 8006 Low Speed Masticating Juicer : Target

And here's a Greenstar twin gear... http://www.greenstar.com/special.asp

Notice I didn't mention oranges or other citrus in the above? That's because I don't consider either of them to be the best for good citrus juice. A reamer type orange juicer, manual or electric, a hand squeezer, or a citrus press all make the kind of juice most Americans prefer... a nice drinkable juice with a little pulp, and without the bitterness you can get if oil from the peel is included (Thats why you have to peel oranges in order to belend them.) And they do it with the least fuss and trouble, because the only preparation required is to cut the fruit in half.

Here's a classic old timey manual reamer style... requires a little effort, but works very well. $15... Glass Citrus Reamer in Prep Utensils | Crate and Barrel

Now look at these... more modern designs, are some virtually works of art, like the two Alessi designs... the iconic Phillipe Starck kind of space ship design at the top, and the MySqueeze, a kind of spiralmetal "football" (#2) that is about as minimalist as can be, yet it works very well. 12 Cool and Innovative Lemon Squeezers – DesignSwan.com

Labelled "lemon squeezers in the above feature," some of them, like the ones with two handles in green, yellow (#4) and orange colors are actually sized for optimal use for limes, lemons, and oranges. Under $15 most places, they are simple to use and clean and effective and take up little space.

In the electric reamer department, I use one I've had for 20 years that still works perfectly, but it's no longer made. This one from Black and Decker is very similar, and it could not be simpler to use. Press a half an orange down onto the reamer and it starts turning, squeeze the peel against the reamer, then lift up and the reamer stops turning. Makes short work of a big batch of oranges. This one is about $17

Amazon.com: Black & Decker CJ625 30-Watt 34-Ounce Citrus Juicer: Kitchen & Dining

And finally the last manual type, a lever citrus press. You see this kind in a lot of bars where they make cocktails with fresh juices, because it is quick and easy and handles all sizes of fruit. $40 - 150

Amazon.com: Pro Commerical Manual Orange Citrus Juicer Lemon Fruit Juicer: Home & Kitchen

And here's a compact Metrokane press, like my grandmother had. Works well, $40 I found one at a thrift shop for $5 that is probably older than I am, and it still works well.

Rabbiit Citrus Juicer by Metrokane - BedBathandBeyond.com

Good luck!
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Old 02-04-2014, 10:05 AM
 
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As others said, the pulp or the "mother" is where all the goodness is! I would dilute with a touch of water. Or omit your citrus type fruits from the juicer and hand squeeze them into your juice so you aren't watering down the flavor. Or strain a big batch of one particular vegetable juiced the normal way. Then use that juice to thin out your mixed drinks. Carrots are a good option.

Have fun though, juicing is excellent and I need to get back into it.
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Old 01-31-2015, 02:14 PM
 
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Hey, I have an omega juicer and my juice is thick. I am having to strain it and I could make baby food. I am getting dry pulp in the other basket, but my juice isn't clear. Any ideas why?
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Old 05-02-2015, 05:13 AM
 
Location: USA
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You may Use some water... Thanks
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Old 05-02-2015, 10:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pickle292 View Post
Straining the pulp ? with a regular strainer ? i have not tried that and i have not added water. Is there a such thing as a special separator for separating the juice from the pulp or?
You shouldn't need to. The juicer has a built in strainer. You know, where you clean the pulp out of the machine?
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