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Old 04-09-2014, 08:31 PM
 
13,710 posts, read 22,826,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
It's not uncommon, although it's definitely not as tasty and definitely more watery. I'd use it in a pinch (risking my nonna's wrath from the great beyond), but I'd much rather use full-fat ricotta.

I have never found ricotta to have all that much taste. There are two things to using cottage cheese. Use SMALL curd an drain it. I do NOT drain it as I never cook the noodles. Any excess moisture is absorbed in the baking process.
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Old 04-09-2014, 11:24 PM
 
Location: CO
2,456 posts, read 2,438,058 times
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We used to have goose liver sandwiches. It came in a roll, was pink in color and was a spreadable paste that you slathered on (white) bread. It sounds disgusting but we thought it was great.

Not sure if Crisco was around then but my mother used Spry instead. My choice was Crisco back in the day for baking. What do people use now instead of solid shortening? I haven't baked in years but a lot of my recipes called for a Crisco-like product because a liquid oil would change the texture.
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Old 04-10-2014, 01:08 AM
 
17,158 posts, read 22,167,733 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theatergypsy View Post
Nope, Philadelphia, PA
i just find little things quite interesting...
i havent heard someone having an icebox in ages..

years ago i use to ask the old timers about their childhoods-if they had electricity, indoor plumbing , one room schoolhouses, etc and many would say they had an icebox

and what was on the dinner menu depended sometimes on what they could shoot after school in the woods -whether it was squirrel, deer, rabbits, etc
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Old 04-10-2014, 03:00 AM
 
6,124 posts, read 5,149,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I remember my younger brothers having the Frankenberry cereal. I'm like that with Reese's Puffs. I can't buy them because I will eat the entire box.



That poor kid. What is wrong with some of these mothers?

My DH never tasted candy until he was in first grade, about 7 years old. He and his siblings weren't allowed to have sweets or sugar...they only had cake with frosting on their birthday. They were vegetarian also - weren't allowed to have meat. Never any snacks between meals. Never any "junk". They never went trick or treating at Halloween or had an Easter Basket of candy. She was one of the first "Nutrition Nelllies", still is. Dessert at her house (if we had it) was usually a sugarless apple pie or tofu pumpkin pie with whole wheat curst. We went there for Christmas last year and I brought a pasta dish and
two different kinds of cake. She was shocked that I brought two cakes.
"TWO cakes???" I always prepare two or three different desserts. A typical holiday dessert at MY mother's house is two cakes (a layer cake and a cheese cake), plus three different kinds of pie, three or four kinds of ice cream, Ready Whip... DH goes hog wild. Last Thanksgiving, he put away half a coconut layer cake and an entire pumpkin pie by himself, not to mention a half gallon of butter pecan ice cream. Not at one sitting - he grazed at them for three days.

My kids were allowed to have their fair share of junk food and candy. Halloween and Easter morning were a free for all - the rule was eat what you want, but don't throw up. Now, my oldest daughter vows to raise my grandson sugar free. She says his first birthdaying cake has to be vegan with cashew date icing. Gag.

Last edited by Mrs. Skeffington; 04-10-2014 at 03:23 AM..
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Old 04-10-2014, 04:18 AM
 
12,607 posts, read 14,609,308 times
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Default Q

Quote:
Originally Posted by Southlander View Post
Nobody's mentioned cottage cheese - that stuff was very popular in the 1950s and '60s. If you were dieting, a half-cup of cottage cheese and a canned pear half were supposed to be a perfect lunch.

Yep, I was starving in about 30 minutes.

You can still buy it...I guess it's mostly used in lasagnas now.
Huh? You're talking about cottage cheese like it's a thing of the past. Mostly used in lasagna? What?! I think people mostly use ricotta cheese in lasagna. I have used cottage cheese, though, mixed with shredded mozzarella, for the cheese layers in lasagna.

People still eat cottage cheese. My husband loves it year round. I eat it in the summer with fresh fruit or tomatoes and cucumbers cut up in it.
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Old 04-10-2014, 04:27 AM
 
12,607 posts, read 14,609,308 times
Reputation: 14096
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs. Skeffington View Post
My DH never tasted candy until he was in first grade, about 7 years old. He and his siblings weren't allowed to have sweets or sugar...they only had cake with frosting on their birthday. They were vegetarian also - weren't allowed to have meat. Never any snacks between meals. Never any "junk". They never went trick or treating at Halloween or had an Easter Basket of candy. She was one of the first "Nutrition Nelllies", still is. Dessert at her house (if we had it) was usually a sugarless apple pie or tofu pumpkin pie with whole wheat curst. We went there for Christmas last year and I brought a pasta dish and
two different kinds of cake. She was shocked that I brought two cakes.
"TWO cakes???" I always prepare two or three different desserts. A typical holiday dessert at MY mother's house is two cakes (a layer cake and a cheese cake), plus three different kinds of pie, three or four kinds of ice cream, Ready Whip... DH goes hog wild. Last Thanksgiving, he put away half a coconut layer cake and an entire pumpkin pie by himself, not to mention a half gallon of butter pecan ice cream. Not at one sitting - he grazed at them for three days.

My kids were allowed to have their fair share of junk food and candy. Halloween and Easter morning were a free for all - the rule was eat what you want, but don't throw up. Now, my oldest daughter vows to raise my grandson sugar free. She says his first birthdaying cake has to be vegan with cashew date icing. Gag.

Ugh. No wonder your DH goes wild when he sees real holiday desserts! My kids went to school with a family of kids whose mother was like that. They would bring their lunch every day and their lunch would consist of vegetables - carrot sticks, celery sticks, etc. The kids were painfully thin.
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Old 04-10-2014, 05:38 AM
 
6,400 posts, read 6,499,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mainebrokerman View Post
i just find little things quite interesting...
i havent heard someone having an icebox in ages..

years ago i use to ask the old timers about their childhoods-if they had electricity, indoor plumbing , one room schoolhouses, etc and many would say they had an icebox

and what was on the dinner menu depended sometimes on what they could shoot after school in the woods -whether it was squirrel, deer, rabbits, etc
My dad hunted squirrel, rabbit, pheasant, and deer. Sometime, I'd go with him, but didn't actually hunt, myself. I remember watching him skin squirrels, and asking for the tails for my bike.

My grandmother, his mom, lived in a shack with no indoor plumbing. It did have a sink, but that drained outside. The water source was a pump on the porch. Being a kid, I liked it. Wasn't quite so fond of the outhouse, though! Her refrigerator was an old rounded one, and her washing machine was a wringer washer. Also fascinating to me, but I was not allowed to put clothes in, only take them out of the wringer.
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Old 04-10-2014, 06:13 AM
 
2,316 posts, read 1,904,417 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saintmj nyc View Post
OMG ! Those bisquits are still around , but now you unroll the label until they pop open - always scares the crap outta me !

LOL I went to grade school in Queens, NY and we ALWAYS had butter on our school lunch sandwiches - even without a sandwhich the bread had loads of real butter on it now that I think about it !

Does anybody remember the candies shaped like little bottles that had sugary colored liquid in them ?
Or candied wax RED lips and harmonicas ? How about those paper strips like straws with powdered , flavored sugar ?

We used to get a lot of food from a place called Gouz - rhymes with cows - was part of their advertising , I remember going there, riding in the back of my grandfathers' station wagon with the other kids no seat belt lol the nervous nellies woulda had him in jail today !

Well at Gouz we would get milk in glass bottles that that my mom used to pour out the top for my parents coffee and use the remainder for us kids , and whenever she made fresh hamburgers she used to give us a little RAW meat funny , we never got sick - but I wouldn't try that now !
I remember wax "cigarettes" or something with sugary liquid in them. Also, the little bottles like that, and weren't there little barrels too?
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Old 04-10-2014, 06:23 AM
Status: "Even better than okay" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
51,209 posts, read 50,499,962 times
Reputation: 60100
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
Using cottage cheese in place of ricotta was quite common. I do not even remember seeing ricotta cheese in stores until 1985.
You know...that brought up a dim memory. A friend of mine moved from NJ to Colorado in the late 70s, and I think she said back then that she couldn't find ricotta out there. We've always had ricotta cheese available in the supermarkets as far as I can recall.

I still can't imagine using cottage cheese in lasagna, though. I just wouldn't make it.
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Old 04-10-2014, 07:08 AM
Status: "Even better than okay" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
51,209 posts, read 50,499,962 times
Reputation: 60100
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
I have never found ricotta to have all that much taste. There are two things to using cottage cheese. Use SMALL curd an drain it. I do NOT drain it as I never cook the noodles. Any excess moisture is absorbed in the baking process.
I don't think either one has much taste--it soaks up the sauce, which I guess is the point--but it's the consistency that seems "wrong" with cottage cheese.
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