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Old 04-14-2014, 05:58 AM
 
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Old Bay.
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Old 04-14-2014, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nickerman View Post
I don't mean salt and pepper. But a spice that wouldn't ruin the taste of some foods. I just ate some potatoes with bacon and cheese sauce on top and it could of used something to give it some zip. It was a little bland.
Wrong cheese? Chives might have helped. Grind your own pepper. Sour cream would go well with that. The artificial cheese seasoning is yeast powder. Or just give up and sprinkle Worchestershire on it.

One spice for everything? Not a chance. I have dozens of spices and sauces in my cupboard, and they all get a workout.
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Old 04-14-2014, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
and I would add to your list, nut meg, in small amounts

As for Mrs Dash, I think it is awful. But I know a lot of people who like it.
Nutmeg is remarkably versatile. Try glazing chicken with brown sugar and nutmeg.
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Old 04-14-2014, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Florida
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Worcestershire sauce, that stuff is sooooooo nommy.
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Old 04-14-2014, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ > Raleigh, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weltschmerz View Post
That's very strange, considering that onion and garlic are toxic to dogs.

The organosulfoxides (sulfurs) in onions, garlic, leeks and chives react with the cell membranes of the red blood cells of dogs, causing the cells to lyse (explode). Cats are even more sensitive to the lytic effects of allium (onion family) toxicosis than dogs.
It is a common myth that a small amount of onions or garlic is not harmful to dogs. In fact, many homemade dog treat recipes include garlic powder as a flavoring because dogs tend to love it so much. Dogs are more tolerant of garlic than onions, and small amounts of either often do not produce effects that are noticed.
The Dangers of Onion Toxicity | Life With Dogs

be very careful how much you use.
I agree - it's all about the size of the dog and the amount of the garlic (and yes, onions are worse for dogs than garlic). People who use a raw food diet for their dogs are usually told to add garlic to the diet because it's good for the dog - you just have to be careful of the amount. I personally wouldn't use dehydrated onion or garlic for a dog - too concentrated.

A little bit of garlic powder isn't going to hurt the little guy, and it got him to eat bland food.

Even the AVMA has adjusted their warning about garlic being toxic to pets. AVMA Media Library | Pod Casts | Garlic: Hazardous or Healthy for My Pet?

Other readings on this topic:

The Shocking Truth About Dogs and Garlic - PetGuide

Garlic in pet food | The Honest Kitchen
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Old 04-14-2014, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Up North in God's Country
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Garlic powder is one of my favorites. On sweets, sprinkle some cinnamon on them! Yum!
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Old 04-14-2014, 02:53 PM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sade693 View Post
I've found that cayenne goes well with nearly everything. I even sprinkle it on sliced green apples!
I like hot sauces such as Tabasco (or something hotter) on both sweet and savory dishes. Occasionally, not constantly.

Of course MSG works on anything, though it may not be considered a spice. Most herb/spice blends have it under one of the approximately 20 legal names, such as "hydrolyzed soy protein" or even "natural flavoring". It's also available pure. It's one reason everyone is getting so fat, since it stimulates appetite.
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Old 04-14-2014, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Squirrel Hill PA
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I like Adobo or seasoned Salt to bring out flavor in things like potatoes, fries, veggies and chicken. But I like to keep a nice selection of dried herbs and other spices around as well.

For loaded cheese fries just salt ad pepper ought to really be the best choice to enhance the flavor.
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Old 04-14-2014, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Western Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thatguydownsouth View Post
Worcestershire sauce, that stuff is sooooooo nommy.
I'm with you on that.
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Old 04-14-2014, 06:08 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 34,604,245 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woof View Post
I like hot sauces such as Tabasco (or something hotter) on both sweet and savory dishes. Occasionally, not constantly.

Of course MSG works on anything, though it may not be considered a spice. Most herb/spice blends have it under one of the approximately 20 legal names, such as "hydrolyzed soy protein" or even "natural flavoring". It's also available pure. It's one reason everyone is getting so fat, since it stimulates appetite.
MSG isn't hydrolized soy protein, and it probably isn't many of those names you're thinking of.

Hydrolized soy protein is a glutamate, and so is MSG, but they aren't the same ingredient. Hydrolized yeast and yeast proteins are also not MSG.

These don't stimulate appetite. They add what's known as a "unami" flavor to foods. This is that indistinguishable "something" that savory foods have. There's sweet, sour, bitter, salty - and unami.
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