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Old 04-15-2014, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Montreal, Quebec
15,087 posts, read 11,522,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vision33r View Post
Very few places in Asia serves ribeye cuts or 2" steaks. I was in Asia and I barely saw steaks that are more than an inch thick.

Almost all Asian places eat thinly sliced meats even chicken is usually cut to small portions.

The only exception being Korean foods feature a lot of thick chunks of meats and better quality cuts.
A portion of meat should be the size of a deck of playing cards. not the size of your head.
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Old 04-15-2014, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Inman Park (Atlanta, GA)
21,871 posts, read 12,749,402 times
Reputation: 14211
Southern China - Cantonese/Guangzhou, most of the diet is not comprised of meat. It is lots of fresh vegetables and seafood. Meat is sliced thinly in dishes so it can cook quickly like the rest of the dish.

"Real" sweet and sour pork is my favorite.



It is the balance between sweet and sour, crunch from the batter and the tenderness of the pork on the inside.
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Old 04-15-2014, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,361,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munna21977 View Post
Chinese Food served in other countries is vastly different then the authentic Chinese Food. In England, chinese food includes Chicken Curry. In India, they have dishes like Chicken Manchurian.

Chinese cuisine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
I have also noticed that fairly often, the small, stand alone Chinese takeout places and buffets aren't even necessarily run by Chinese. The "Shanghai Cafe" in my old neighborhood was run by a Vietnamese family (although ironically, the nearest sushi place was run and staffed by Chinese, as a multilingual friend found out when we went in), and one of the most popular Chinese restaurants in my college town was Korean-owned. Not that it matters one way or another, given that the vast majority of the dishes are American in origin, anyway.
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Old 04-16-2014, 05:22 AM
 
Location: Central Midwest
3,401 posts, read 2,394,540 times
Reputation: 13691
I had Chinese food at a tiny little place this past weekend. The person who waited on us could barely speak English plus the cooks in the back were speaking what I assumed was the Chinese language. This place definitely was run by Asian persons.

The food was spectacular, but being a routine type person I chose something familiar rather than exotic. The chicken fried rice was the best! Now I have a place to go for great Chinese food.
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Old 04-16-2014, 08:28 PM
 
3,140 posts, read 4,782,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rural chick View Post
I had Chinese food at a tiny little place this past weekend. The person who waited on us could barely speak English plus the cooks in the back were speaking what I assumed was the Chinese language. This place definitely was run by Asian persons.
This means nothing where run-of-the-mill Chinese restaurants are concerned. They are "taught" to all cook the same things, have their menus "issued" to them, and told all Americans like their food very sweet so lay on the sugar. This, all told to me by the VERY Chinese guy who owns one of my local take-out spots.
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Old 04-17-2014, 08:03 PM
 
32,538 posts, read 29,333,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weltschmerz View Post
Cream cheese? I've never seen ANY dairy in any Chinese restaurant.
Deep fried milk.

It's a very common dessert in Chinese restaurants (family owned - not chain-style) in California.
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Old 04-17-2014, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,653 posts, read 14,754,589 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weltschmerz View Post
Why would a Chinese restaurant serve Indian rice?
My mom once heated up basmati (rather than plain white) rice while I made ma po tofu and oh man, it was so good!
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Old 04-17-2014, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Montreal, Quebec
15,087 posts, read 11,522,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
Deep fried milk.

It's a very common dessert in Chinese restaurants (family owned - not chain-style) in California.
I went to my acupuncturist today, a Dr. Yuan, and asked him this very thing. He's from Shanghai.
He said they NEVER drink milk or eat dairy back home. Never. Milk is for infants only.
He only started eating cheese since moving to Canada and thought the concept was disgusting at first. Now he loves it.
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Old 04-18-2014, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2,540 posts, read 3,059,585 times
Reputation: 6721
Here in the greater Toronto area, we have a large Chinese population, at least a half a million of them.

They have large banquet style resturants , that can seat two or three hundred people. The vast majority of the customers are Chinese people. The menus are printed in Chinese, with short English descriptions added underneath. It is obvious that their main focus is their own community. I love the food, as it is made for their palette, and taste. Its not unusual to see a Chinese family group that numbers over forty people at one of those places, all sitting around big tables.

We also have some Chinese buffet places, that are Chinese owned and managed, and staffed. The food is good and there sure is a lot of it, all for a fixed price of either $12 for lunch , or $19 for dinner. They have what I call "westernised Chinese food " along with roast beef, ham and French fries. Ice cream and fruit pies and pastries for dessert. I am taking about the Mandarin chain, who have 25 locations and have been around for 35 years.

Jim B.

Toronto.
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Old 04-18-2014, 04:54 PM
 
32,538 posts, read 29,333,321 times
Reputation: 32238
Quote:
Originally Posted by weltschmerz View Post
I went to my acupuncturist today, a Dr. Yuan, and asked him this very thing. He's from Shanghai.
He said they NEVER drink milk or eat dairy back home. Never. Milk is for infants only.
He only started eating cheese since moving to Canada and thought the concept was disgusting at first. Now he loves it.
Apparently deep fried milk is regional in China. The first time I had it was in the 70's after a coffee shop we ate at hired a cook who had immigrated.

One of the great things about food in CA is the affect immigration has had. It's not difficult to find restaurants that serve regional dishes from.... wherever. Plus cultures mix and the food reflects it. Anthony Bourdain's CNN special on Koreatown is a great illustration of how Angelenos eat. If you haven't seen it, I can recommend it. He seemed quite amazed at the (to us perfectly natural) combos people come up with.

Last edited by DewDropInn; 04-18-2014 at 05:06 PM..
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