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Old 04-15-2014, 12:16 PM
bg7
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
What parts of the Cow are mostly used in Mediterranean Cuisine? What do they do with the left overs? It seems like a huge waste to just throw it all away.

No wonder meat and food is expensive. I have noticed most cultures only use some parts of the animals they slaughter, even pig. Only Chickens are consumed whole mostly.

Which cuisine uses the most cow, and uses most of the cow? Is it american? We have a large assortment of steaks, and BBQ. What happens to the meant in the legs and forearms of the cow? Cant those be eaten?
You seem confused - nothing gets thrown out that is edible. Even the non-edible parts such as bones and hooves are used for non-food purposes. In short, what the heck are you talking about?
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Old 04-15-2014, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Montreal, Quebec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Threestep View Post
Go to a Hispanic market.
Don't have any up here.
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Old 04-15-2014, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
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I thought Mediterranean food meant lamb instead of beef.
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Old 04-15-2014, 10:42 PM
 
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In italian cuisine, what part of cow do they use to make those deli loafs, the meatballs? Do they use the ribs? I have never seen ribs on an italian menu, at least in the US. Do they use the chuck pieces? Do they eat Tbone in Italy.

In Greek cuisine, they use beef mostly for gyro and kebabs right? Do they use all parts of the cow to make those?
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Old 04-16-2014, 01:38 AM
 
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a restaurant can order whatever piece from a cow/pig/chicken/ they want,-they arent buying the whole critter

if a particular restaurant sells more rib eyes than t-bones,,then they buy more rib eyes than t-bones

they dont buy the whole critter, use a piece of it and wonder what to do with the rest

most buy off food wholesalers, or food companies..


sounds like you are getting caught up in local menu themes..

if im selling kebabs, then im just buying the kebabs all chunked up, or buying the piece of meat i want to chunk up for kebabs...thats it..(i get those choices from the food wholesalers/companies i am buying from


you can pretty much buy any piece you specifically want ,,,and just that piece..
i had an order recently for 200lbs of porterhouse/t-bone steaks, so i ordered JUST the short-loin that you slice on the band saw to get these steaks. its a piece of about 22lbs - i just bought that piece for that order..

in the big picture,, here's a simple overview of how we can buy specifics now

packing plants/slaughter-houses, buy cattle from farmers, they sell to beef companies, they sell to food wholesalers,
restaurants, grocery stores/club stores,

in the end, consumer demand drives the business.. towards christmas, if rib roasts are in high demand,,,,then the end cuts (chucks and rounds) are traditionally cheaper..(the rib used for the roasts are a low percentage of total weight)


in the northeast, spring is finally arriving, which means, people will be getting their grills out and grilling, so burger will sell 5 times better than it did in the winter... as with rib eyes, strip sirloins, t-bones, etc,
so the demand for this product goes up...so production will start increasing..


the u.s. and other countries exports alot of meats to each other.... australia and new zealand raise alot of lamb, and export it all over the world.






up until the 1970's, most of the larger grocery stores/supermarkets/iga's would receive "sides" - these were sides of beef rolled into the stores on rails,,(basically half a critter, cut in two, refrigerated), and the butchers would cut the whole thing up and display in the meatcase.
this was when the "housewife" (before so many woman went into the work-force) they had much more time to cook, and usually had larger families back then- meat was the at the center of the plate of most meals, and most of what the butchers cut from the whole beef sides-sold, from shank soup bones, to steaks to burger, this changed in the late 70's and early 80's because so many woman went into the work-force,,,,with a two income family, and mom working the need for "convenient" food skyrocketed, (fresh meats, not frozen, tv dinners had been around a long time) this was when the sales of roasts dropped by half, because it was more for a sunday dinner,,than an everyday item- this was when the move to boneless took off- bnls pork chops started to outsell bone in,,,boneless chicken breasts- yes, they were leaner(lower in fat) and had the perception of being quicker to cook

but their was a drawback , and still is a drawback to stores cutting up whole sides of beef..

what if you sold 5 times more rib eyes , than strip steaks or t-bone steaks?? the sides had limited supply of that one primal or piece....so, you'd be out of rib-eyes and backed up on the other meats.

because of this, and because the industry said- hey why are we shipping millions of pounds of bone and fat across country to be hauled away from the store as waste - so they started selling smaller pieces to the food wholesalers and restaurants and stores (and much much better sanitation at store level)
so a major beef company called IBP started pushing more boneless primals (specific pieces, not the sides) in the mid 70's, well this caught on like wild-fire,,because if a store sold mostly rib eye steaks, they now could buy just the boneless rib eye....this was huge,,,and the need for all those butchers, boning and breaking the carcass at store level was less, so the stores could cut payrolls,,,(boning and breaking wasnt the skill part of a butcher, it is the cutting, and merchandising)
this was huge in the industry,,

so, now the stores could order almost exactly what they wanted for specific items,,, and this was awesome,,because if a store had a specific steak on sale- say a t-bone,,he could order just the short-loins, without wondering what he will do with the rest of the carcass, or have to reduce the price to sell so cheap, that he wont make any money.

at this time--- in the early 80's the push was on for leaner meats... so this pushed the industry also in this boxed beef direction,,,if a store is now selling 10 times more top round steaks because its lean, they can buy just inside-rounds, soooo much easier..at the retail side.





i hope this answers your question,,,, stores and restaurants can buy specifics now,,,it wasnt always the case
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Old 04-16-2014, 04:26 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 34,623,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
In italian cuisine, what part of cow do they use to make those deli loafs, the meatballs? Do they use the ribs? I have never seen ribs on an italian menu, at least in the US. Do they use the chuck pieces? Do they eat Tbone in Italy.

In Greek cuisine, they use beef mostly for gyro and kebabs right? Do they use all parts of the cow to make those?
You're definitely getting caught up with stereotypes and "commonly known" items in restaurants. Greek food is -primarily- lamb and fish. Gyros are typically lamb - if you are actually in Greece, and not at the Athena XVII Greek diner in East Bumtish Kentucky.

The restaurants do -not- make use of the entire cow. The beef *industry,* however, does.
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Old 04-17-2014, 09:05 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
20,999 posts, read 25,765,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
In italian cuisine, what part of cow do they use to make those deli loafs, the meatballs? Do they use the ribs? I have never seen ribs on an italian menu, at least in the US. Do they use the chuck pieces? Do they eat Tbone in Italy.

In Greek cuisine, they use beef mostly for gyro and kebabs right? Do they use all parts of the cow to make those?
Oh, I see. You believe that in Greece, nobody ever eats anything but gyros or kebabs. I suggest that you go down to the library and check out 2-3 Greek cookbooks and see what sort of food is eaten in Greece.

Beef in Europe costs roughly 5 times what beef in the USA costs, so servings of meat tend to be smaller. But, yes, you can get a huge steak in Europe if you can afford to pay for it. Believe me, for what it costs, they aren't throwing away any meat because they can't figure out how to cook it.
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Old 04-17-2014, 09:27 AM
 
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A restaurant menu is not indicative of an entire Mediterranean diet....especially those from outside the native country. Just think about what is served in American restaurants and how it differs from what is actually served at the typical American table.

I lived in Italy for a number of years and I can say that it appeared that a house by house comparison, they waste far less then we do. They still rely of local farms and butcher shops instead of large supermarkets. The parts of animals not used for human consumption are used for animal feed and manufacturing.
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Old 04-17-2014, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Pacific NW
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
But arent most of those items listed in your chart not actually entirely used by any one cuisine. A cuisine may use a few of those selections, but the rest they dont use. And it seems a lot on that chart is american style steaks that no one else eats, or cuts that I only hear of being used in some american regional cuisine like the tri tip.
Any cuisine, anywhere, if they kill an animal for food ... they're going to eat the whole thing. Do you think they discard any of it? If anything, non-American cultures are much better at making use of the whole animal.
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Old 04-17-2014, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ > Raleigh, NC
14,298 posts, read 17,505,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
In italian cuisine, what part of cow do they use to make those deli loafs, the meatballs? Do they use the ribs? I have never seen ribs on an italian menu, at least in the US. Do they use the chuck pieces? Do they eat Tbone in Italy.

In Greek cuisine, they use beef mostly for gyro and kebabs right? Do they use all parts of the cow to make those?
Italian cookery often includes the ribs and chuck pieces in the long, slow cooking process to make gravy (which in America, we call spaghetti sauce). That type of sauce is far more common than meatballs. Though I will note that pork and sometimes oxtail are often included as well.

Steak is fairly common, often T-Bone. It's called bistecca.

Both Italian and Greece use liver - especially calves liver. Try throwing some vinegar (balsalmic or cider) on your liver and onions and you'll see what a difference it makes. Short ribs are used in both cuisines regularly.
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