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Old 04-19-2014, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
22,894 posts, read 21,964,249 times
Reputation: 27969

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kaimuki View Post
False: Do not put butter on white rice.

I've been eating rice since I was a little boy, but I never put butter on it. That doesn't others can't.
That doesn't other cant? You dropped a word, didn't you? I think that my mother put butter on rice. I scarcely remember because she rarely served it.
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Old 04-19-2014, 10:56 PM
 
2,540 posts, read 3,320,511 times
Reputation: 5542
I grew up in still-soviet Russia where food, especially anything not local, was at a deficit. That along with a cultural love of old wives' tales made up for a lot of interesting food rules, not just in our family but pretty much in every single family across the nation. Especially when it came to feeding kids - because, again, nutrient-rich food such as fresh fruit and veggies weren't abundant and parents tried to make up for that by feeding kids what was deemed most nutritious.

Kids, and most households in general, were pretty much obligated to eat, every day:
- hot cereal for breakfast, kids were fed farina, cream of wheat type cereal (I still remember how much I hated it). Now it's been said that it's pretty much nutritionally void and nothing but refined carbs but back then it was considered the best food for kids.

- some sort of soup was a must at every dinner, there were usually three courses, the soup, then the entree, and dessert. The soup was considered to be essential for digestion. To this day, my grandma and MIL ask me how often I cook soup for DS, and sigh when I say it's not too often. There's even a term for "eating dry", meaning things like sandwiches and without soup, which are for some reason thought to be terrible for digestion and bad for you, leading to ulcers and gastritis

- bread with butter had to be eaten with pretty much every meal. Also every meal was finished off with hot black tea with lots of sugar and lemon, even for kids.

- Dessert was typically either "kompot", a type of simmered fruit "soup" (actually tasty), or "kisel'", cooked fruit thickened with cornstarch (kinda gross).

- I've always been convinced, because I've heard that so much, that you'll get a horribly upset stomach from drinking milk together with any kind of raw fruit, veggies, or juice, or fish as someone said above. So much so that I still can't bring myself to do it

- snacking between meals is bad, food that isn't part of a hot meal is bad, "dry" foods are bad...but apparently feeding kids potatoes fried in lard was perfectly fine and healthy In fact, loading up on the animal fats, rich meat broths, etc, was considered a really healthy thing for kids.

There's probably more that I'm forgetting...

Last edited by EvilCookie; 04-19-2014 at 11:05 PM..
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Old 04-19-2014, 11:10 PM
 
2,540 posts, read 3,320,511 times
Reputation: 5542
Oh and things to eat/drink when sick could have a separate chapter...my "favorite" was a concoction for coughs made from hot milk, melted butter, honey, and baking soda...I don't remember it helping coughs other than the fact that it took my mind off it as I attempted to get it down without throwing up *gag*. There was a lot of eating of raw garlic and onions and tea with honey, at one point they even tried to feed me raw onions with honey but I wouldn't have none of it Camomile tea was a cure for everything from colds to stomach aches - I used to hate it, now I actually find I crave it when sick, lol. Homemade raspberry preserves were given for fevers as raspberries are supposedly a natural fever reducer (kids didn't mind that one though ). Oatmeal and pureed foods and more soups were supposed to treat ulcers...
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Old 04-19-2014, 11:11 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,437 posts, read 41,857,847 times
Reputation: 47051
My mother also told me that if you wanted candle at the table they had to be lit. Not sure why anybody would have unlit candles there in the first place . She also said it was tacky to have any candles in the home which had not been used so she would always lit them just for a second or two just long enough to blacken the wick I think this meant you should never have candles just for "show".

Mother was a young officers wife during WWII and she paid very strict attention to proper etiquette, especially table manners. I doubt she was raised with all these rules but she sure did raise me and my brother with them. She actually had sets of silverware with individual butter knives, shrimp forks, individual salt and pepper shakers for each place setting , etc. She did some pretty fancy entertaining back in the day and could not bring herself to get rid of any of that stuff. Unfortunately I still have most of it and can't get rid of it either.
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Old 04-20-2014, 02:42 AM
 
Location: Finland
6,319 posts, read 5,263,858 times
Reputation: 10156
Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilCookie View Post
I grew up in still-soviet Russia where food, especially anything not local, was at a deficit. That along with a cultural love of old wives' tales made up for a lot of interesting food rules, not just in our family but pretty much in every single family across the nation. Especially when it came to feeding kids - because, again, nutrient-rich food such as fresh fruit and veggies weren't abundant and parents tried to make up for that by feeding kids what was deemed most nutritious.

Kids, and most households in general, were pretty much obligated to eat, every day:
- hot cereal for breakfast, kids were fed farina, cream of wheat type cereal (I still remember how much I hated it). Now it's been said that it's pretty much nutritionally void and nothing but refined carbs but back then it was considered the best food for kids.

- some sort of soup was a must at every dinner, there were usually three courses, the soup, then the entree, and dessert. The soup was considered to be essential for digestion. To this day, my grandma and MIL ask me how often I cook soup for DS, and sigh when I say it's not too often. There's even a term for "eating dry", meaning things like sandwiches and without soup, which are for some reason thought to be terrible for digestion and bad for you, leading to ulcers and gastritis

- bread with butter had to be eaten with pretty much every meal. Also every meal was finished off with hot black tea with lots of sugar and lemon, even for kids.

- Dessert was typically either "kompot", a type of simmered fruit "soup" (actually tasty), or "kisel'", cooked fruit thickened with cornstarch (kinda gross).

- I've always been convinced, because I've heard that so much, that you'll get a horribly upset stomach from drinking milk together with any kind of raw fruit, veggies, or juice, or fish as someone said above. So much so that I still can't bring myself to do it

- snacking between meals is bad, food that isn't part of a hot meal is bad, "dry" foods are bad...but apparently feeding kids potatoes fried in lard was perfectly fine and healthy In fact, loading up on the animal fats, rich meat broths, etc, was considered a really healthy thing for kids.

There's probably more that I'm forgetting...
Love both of those!
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Old 04-20-2014, 05:33 AM
 
Location: Texas
1,280 posts, read 1,263,326 times
Reputation: 1877
[quote=vmaxnc;34436349]Whats the reason behind that tale?

I'm 47 and have never had self-induced food poisoning. Pizza stays in the oven overnight, food sits in the sink straight from the freezer until it's ready to use, sometimes Chinese leftovers are left out overnight as well to further meld the flavors together. I figure that pretty much anything is going to be thoroughly cooked or at least heated before it's eaten, so I'm safe. I wouldn't serve guests any of this, but a buddy or girlfriend? Absolutely, after I've informed them.

I've read all views about this, down to some pastas should be oiled while they cook, while others should not. Some go so far as specific dishes.



I'm all for avoiding health issues, but I think we may go too far in some instances. A friend often throw away food because it sat out while we ate! What a waste. [quote]
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Quote function not working

Anyway, growing up in the south frozen food was always left out to thaw. I remember after dinner the fried chicken, pork chops and veggies along with left over bread sitting on the table. Grandma would take a clean table cloth and cover the food.

Potato salads and such went into the icebox.
I am in my fifties now and I am still alive and so far have not made my family and friends sick with food poisoning.

I just refuse to believe everything that the food and health police preach.
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Old 04-20-2014, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Manayunk
513 posts, read 561,288 times
Reputation: 1185
My grandma (who grew up during the depression) made iced tea, by leaving it out to sit in the sun all day. She also made tomato and mayo sandwiches, fried tomatoes after being tossed in flour, salt, and pepper. And many other things. She never wasted anything ever.

I get the cut meat one piece at a time, but what about for a toddler, I cut my three year olds food all at once.

Also my MIL and FIL are from soviet era Russia and have the habit of stuffing food into you and getting angry at not eating. Making a 3 year old eat every two hours and getting upset at me for not getting her to Finish an adult size chicken breast at 1 PM after having a hot dog and two pancakes at 8 AM and an omelette st. 10:30 AM. Idk if its a soviet thing but its a constant eat, eat, eat, past the point of being full.

I put a tiny bit of oil or spray pam when boiling pasta to prevent boil over. I hate looking away only to have it boil over. Ugh.
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Old 04-20-2014, 07:19 AM
 
2,442 posts, read 1,812,346 times
Reputation: 4644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
When I was growing up my mother had crazy ideas about beverages. She didn't allow us to drink soda of any kind. No colas or any other carbonated beverages. She claimed they were bad for us. She did, however, let us drink Kool-Aid. All the time. Loaded with two cups of sugar per pitcher. We were also allowed to drink milk but we were never encouraged to drink water. When we were sick she made us egg nog milk, raw eggs, sugar, and vanilla. Even for stomach upsets. I still can't get her to explain the thinking behind that one.
That sort of dish is classic old fashioned Anglo Saxon convalescent food.
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Old 04-20-2014, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,437 posts, read 41,857,847 times
Reputation: 47051
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gcs15 View Post
My grandma (who grew up during the depression) made iced tea, by leaving it out to sit in the sun all day. She also made tomato and mayo sandwiches, fried tomatoes after being tossed in flour, salt, and pepper. And many other things. She never wasted anything ever.

I get the cut meat one piece at a time, but what about for a toddler, I cut my three year olds food all at once.

Also my MIL and FIL are from soviet era Russia and have the habit of stuffing food into you and getting angry at not eating. Making a 3 year old eat every two hours and getting upset at me for not getting her to Finish an adult size chicken breast at 1 PM after having a hot dog and two pancakes at 8 AM and an omelette st. 10:30 AM. Idk if its a soviet thing but its a constant eat, eat, eat, past the point of being full.

I put a tiny bit of oil or spray pam when boiling pasta to prevent boil over. I hate looking away only to have it boil over. Ugh.
I hope you are standing up to them about this. Many of us who had parents young during the depression were forced to clean our plate and not waste. I'm still frugal and I encourage my kids to try everything just once but I never insist they clean their plates.
Obesity in childhood in at epidemic state. Don't let your inlaws have their way on this and don't leave your child with them for meals cause they will probably do this behind your back.
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Old 04-20-2014, 10:13 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
18,177 posts, read 17,321,887 times
Reputation: 30421
My mother only allowed us to drink soda at special occasions such as birthday parties, celebrations, etc.. At other times, we had to ask permission so she could monitor our soda intake. LOL My Caucasian grandmother also made me eggnog when I was sick. Once I was visiting my grandparents in Rochester, New York during the winter time and I came down with the flu. My grandmother made me eggnog the same say your mother did except she added freshly grated nutmeg to it. My own mother used to make me baked custard when I was recovering from the flu.

That makes good sense, to me anyway. I had exactly the same upbringing. Soda was for a treat--you didn't go around drinking it every day. A birthday, or other special occasion, that was all. And that's how it should be. Soda is really unhealthy.

Baked custard is for people who are recuperating. It sure has a lot more nutrients than something you get in the hospital like...jello. It's easy for the sick person to swallow and it has the nutrition from eggs and milk. The sugar is just there so kids will like it. I made it for my husband a few weeks ago when he was sick. Ideally maybe a sick kid should be eating brussels sprouts or something (yuck) but being realistic, they will be more likely to eat the warm, smooth, sweet custard. The only "bad" thing in it is sugar--and it that's all the sugar they're getting, it's not bad.
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