U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 04-20-2014, 11:00 AM
 
164 posts, read 151,811 times
Reputation: 198

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilCookie View Post
- some sort of soup was a must at every dinner, there were usually three courses, the soup, then the entree, and dessert. The soup was considered to be essential for digestion. To this day, my grandma and MIL ask me how often I cook soup for DS, and sigh when I say it's not too often. There's even a term for "eating dry", meaning things like sandwiches and without soup, which are for some reason thought to be terrible for digestion and bad for you, leading to ulcers and gastritis
Same here. Soup is hugh in home cooked Cantonese cuisine. There were only handful of days in a year when my mother didn't make some sort of slow fired soup. Our soups tend to be on the medicinal side and it's usually broth based with Chinese herbs. I don't really make the soup my mother makes unless I'm feeling under the weather but I have some sort of soup everyday.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-20-2014, 11:38 AM
 
4,721 posts, read 13,629,193 times
Reputation: 4685
Quote:
Originally Posted by hellpaso View Post
No offense to anyone, but these are just common rules of etiquette, & really shouldn't be "family-specific".
I agree, and my dad and mom were manners police.
To this day, when I see someone cut up all their meat at once I assume, if they aren't a 3 year old, they have bad table manners. Nothing "hoity toity" about it, just really surprising to see an adult do this.
And baseball hat at the table , off to the gallows.
Drink three glasses of milk a day (whole, of course) was a law straight from the dairy industry but a mantra we had to live by.
Veggies? Dad didn't like them so if it was green, mom creamed it.
A wonder we weren't all obese.

Last edited by nanannie; 04-20-2014 at 11:48 AM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2014, 12:00 PM
 
2,540 posts, read 3,310,609 times
Reputation: 5542
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
I hope you are standing up to them about this. Many of us who had parents young during the depression were forced to clean our plate and not waste. I'm still frugal and I encourage my kids to try everything just once but I never insist they clean their plates.
Obesity in childhood in at epidemic state. Don't let your inlaws have their way on this and don't leave your child with them for meals cause they will probably do this behind your back.
My MIL is bad with that too, drives me nuts. she doesn't force feed DS or get angry but If he's being picky she'll dance around him and offer to make different things one after another, spoon feed him (he's 4!), and if he still refuses to eat dinner she thinks a huge plate of cake and ice cream is ' better than nothing' . She'll also constantly offer him snacks like buns, cookies, cakes. etc every five minutes because 'he likes them'. Suffices to say meals with her stress me out and I'm glad they don't happen too often otherwise the kid would have a weight problem. Fwiw she herself is thin and watches what she eats for health reasons, makes me want to scream sometimes 'why do you think the child should be constantly eating unhealthy food that you won't eat??'
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2014, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Manayunk
513 posts, read 558,595 times
Reputation: 1185
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
I hope you are standing up to them about this. Many of us who had parents young during the depression were forced to clean our plate and not waste. I'm still frugal and I encourage my kids to try everything just once but I never insist they clean their plates.
Obesity in childhood in at epidemic state. Don't let your inlaws have their way on this and don't leave your child with them for meals cause they will probably do this behind your back.
Yes, my daughter is on the lower end of the weight scale and has never been a "chubby" baby or kid. She is thin and eats when she wants to and only to when her "belly is full". They don't understand why I am okay with this. It's frustrating especially when all they talk about is food and what she ate and what she will eat next. It really borders on obsession. I was once yelled at by them about how she's "too thin and I am starving her" the doctor says she is healthy, she has plenty of energy, she just isn't eating 3000 calories a day.

I do the same as you. Try something once, if you don't like it you don't have to eat anymore. Her favorite food is salmon so I can't complain. Her cousin, another girl, they compare her too was so chubby that her fat rolls had to be cleaned out because she would get yeast infections and dirt/goo buildup in the rolls. Trying to prove that is not healthy vs. her is like pulling teeth. Luckily, we don't have to deal with it often anymore.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2014, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Montreal, Quebec
15,087 posts, read 11,539,827 times
Reputation: 9699
Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilCookie View Post
I grew up in still-soviet Russia where food, especially anything not local, was at a deficit. That along with a cultural love of old wives' tales made up for a lot of interesting food rules, not just in our family but pretty much in every single family across the nation. Especially when it came to feeding kids - because, again, nutrient-rich food such as fresh fruit and veggies weren't abundant and parents tried to make up for that by feeding kids what was deemed most nutritious.

Kids, and most households in general, were pretty much obligated to eat, every day:
- hot cereal for breakfast, kids were fed farina, cream of wheat type cereal (I still remember how much I hated it). Now it's been said that it's pretty much nutritionally void and nothing but refined carbs but back then it was considered the best food for kids.

- some sort of soup was a must at every dinner, there were usually three courses, the soup, then the entree, and dessert. The soup was considered to be essential for digestion. To this day, my grandma and MIL ask me how often I cook soup for DS, and sigh when I say it's not too often. There's even a term for "eating dry", meaning things like sandwiches and without soup, which are for some reason thought to be terrible for digestion and bad for you, leading to ulcers and gastritis

- bread with butter had to be eaten with pretty much every meal. Also every meal was finished off with hot black tea with lots of sugar and lemon, even for kids.

- Dessert was typically either "kompot", a type of simmered fruit "soup" (actually tasty), or "kisel'", cooked fruit thickened with cornstarch (kinda gross).

- I've always been convinced, because I've heard that so much, that you'll get a horribly upset stomach from drinking milk together with any kind of raw fruit, veggies, or juice, or fish as someone said above. So much so that I still can't bring myself to do it

- snacking between meals is bad, food that isn't part of a hot meal is bad, "dry" foods are bad...but apparently feeding kids potatoes fried in lard was perfectly fine and healthy In fact, loading up on the animal fats, rich meat broths, etc, was considered a really healthy thing for kids.

There's probably more that I'm forgetting...
I still make kompot from fruit a little past its prime, but I ADORE kisel. And kholodetz.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2014, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Montreal, Quebec
15,087 posts, read 11,539,827 times
Reputation: 9699
Quote:
Originally Posted by nanannie View Post
I agree, and my dad and mom were manners police.
To this day, when I see someone cut up all their meat at once I assume, if they aren't a 3 year old, they have bad table manners. Nothing "hoity toity" about it, just really surprising to see an adult do this.
And baseball hat at the table , off to the gallows.
Drink three glasses of milk a day (whole, of course) was a law straight from the dairy industry but a mantra we had to live by.
Veggies? Dad didn't like them so if it was green, mom creamed it.
A wonder we weren't all obese.
ANY hat at the table and it was off to the gallows.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2014, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Illinois
3,168 posts, read 4,162,991 times
Reputation: 5580
As a child I always preferred the hot dogs, sausages, and chicken during grilling season. I thought that I just didn't like steak because my family always cooked it to a charred crisp. As I got older I would order it done or well done because that's all I knew. As an adult I had a rare steak by complete accident and I haven't looked back since.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2014, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Manayunk
513 posts, read 558,595 times
Reputation: 1185
Quote:
Originally Posted by CMichele View Post
As a child I always preferred the hot dogs, sausages, and chicken during grilling season. I thought that I just didn't like steak because my family always cooked it to a charred crisp. As I got older I would order it done or well done because that's all I knew. As an adult I had a rare steak by complete accident and I haven't looked back since.
Same thing happened to me. Only I like it Medium Rare. My mom had a habit of overcookng everything. I now take pride in my steaks with some red in it and chicken that isn't left on for twenty mins. I also love coating the steak in kosher salt for 45 mins then rinsing it off.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2014, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,827 posts, read 39,473,952 times
Reputation: 48645
My mom overcooked meat because my dad doesn't like meat less than well done. She also avoided most seasonings and never ever used cheese, sour cream, mayo, or yogurt as an ingredient, because my dad didn't like those things. I swore I would never let one individual's particular tastes dictate the food preparation for the whole household.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2014, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Central Midwest
3,401 posts, read 2,398,382 times
Reputation: 13691
My dad was strict about eating at least one bite of everything served to the family. My brother couldn't tolerate some of the foods, with a result of upchuck at times. I think my dad's rules were a bit harsh, at least for my brother, the picky eater. I ate everything with no problem so I guess that's why I'm not a picky eater.

I learned to cook from my Grammie and she was a great cook. When I went to culinary school, I had to reverse a lot of things. The instructors said that's not the way to do that!!! Famous last words believe me! By the time I graduated, I was pretty tired of those words. I've talked to other persons who went to culinary school about things I was taught and they weren't taught these same things. I firmly believe the things taught in various culinary schools depends on where you attended classes.

What's right for one family or cook is not necessarily right for another. Family traditions greatly differ.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top