U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 04-24-2014, 05:00 PM
 
Location: Georgia, on the Florida line, right above Tallahassee
10,473 posts, read 13,413,505 times
Reputation: 6344

Advertisements

I'm getting older. 42 at the moment. In the last years, it seems I've grown a lesser threshold for salt. I can taste it more. This may not belong in this forum, but I be darned if I know where else to put it.

I had a hamburger this weekend and the (store brand) Dijon my friends bought, was just incredibly salty. I checked the nutrition facts. It's a 12 oz. bottle with 68 servings at 120mg of salt per serving. That's 8000 mg in a bottle. I'm wondering who gets an exact 68 servings from a bottle of mustard, but I digress.

Another bottle of store brand (24 oz, servings 136) has only 60mg per serving.

So maybe this belongs in the old folks forum or maybe something I can bring up here. Anyone else get a stronger sense of salt taste as they get older? Kind of like how things I thought were incredibly bitter - like greens - became more yummier the older I get.

There are things that I used to buy from a vending machine with the same problem now. Everything seems much too salty. You might think I'm dehydrated. I drink a 64 oz container of water every day (sometimes two of them), plus other liquids occasionally, like a coffee or diet soft drink, milk, orange juice, etc. sometimes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-26-2014, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Western Oregon
1,379 posts, read 1,226,156 times
Reputation: 1268
I'm with you. I don't think it's necessarily age. A lot of people like things really salty, and buy the brands that have more salt. They can have it. I read ingredients when I buy stuff, and I avoid things with a lot of salt.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2014, 01:03 PM
 
13,710 posts, read 22,832,449 times
Reputation: 18521
I just tasted 120 mustards last month as part of an international competition. It seems to that the worst category in terms of salt was the Dijon mustards.

I did NOT find any of them to be all that salty but one of the other judges was bothered by any of the Dijons.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2014, 02:29 PM
 
5,091 posts, read 13,167,468 times
Reputation: 6912
Prepared Mustard is a preserved product with vinegar and salt. It is a shelf stable product and consequently needs that level of salt and vinegar. It is same with preserved cucumbers, as in pickles. It is the nature of the product from a time when it was necessary to preserve with salt and vinegar.

It is what it is; if you do not like that product, then do not buy it as it is not a necessary product. You can easily make your own. I have many times.

Just buy some mustard powder or whole mustard and grind for coarse mustard, add vinegar and salt (yes that would be important for the flavor you expect). If you like it less salty, then add less. If it is like less vinegar, use less. It will thicken as it stands. Keep in refrigerated. Prepared mustard has tumeric for color, so add that if you like.

Dijon is made is verjus (unfermented wine grape juice) which you may have trouble obtaining, so you can use just any white wine grape juice. You can also make it with wine cooked with garlic and an onion or just use shallots. Or you can use apple cider. Strain, add salt and vinegar (I like apple cider)--again to taste. Whisk in the mustard and bring to a boil and simmer for a few minutes. You can add a little honey, brown sugar, white sugar. You can add hot sauce. You can add horseradish. You can make it with beer.

I remember a product that failed in the market about 50 years ago--it was called MusCap--mustard tomato blend.

You can make it sweet and sour or salty or hot or hot sweet and sour. Whatever you like, be creative.

I can write a exact recipe but I like to scratch cook from the hip! If you need an exact recipe, then there are many on the web.

You can make mustard just as you need and store for a short time, refrigerated. Then you have what you like and not worry about the store bought product.

Just a note: The elderly tend to loose their sensation of salty, from my experience. However, everyone is different.

Livecontent

Last edited by livecontent; 04-26-2014 at 03:14 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2014, 02:43 PM
 
20,208 posts, read 28,258,856 times
Reputation: 18011
Westbrae makes a whole line of all natural products including a low sodium Dijon Mustard (65mg per teaspoon) as well as a no-sodium Stoneground Mustard. Most traditional larger supermarkets carry it as well as place like Whole Foods, or health food stores with grocery items.

Westbrae Natural: Dijon Style Mustard Product Info
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2014, 02:57 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
20,999 posts, read 25,765,271 times
Reputation: 39390
OP, I don't think it is your taste buds.

Public taste seems to be moving towards more salt and more sugar. I suspect it is too many meals eaten in instant burger restaurants, where salt and grease are the flavoring agents.

The price of spices, herbs, and flavorings has gone up steeply and commercial foods appear to be replacing the expensive seasonings with cheap salt.

I can now taste salt in candy bars where there is no reason to use salt.

Newer recipes are often way over laden with both salt and sugar. I looked at one cake recipe that everyone was raving about and it contained 4 1/2 Cups of sugar. Just a regular size cake. 4 1/2 Cups!

I routinely cut any salt in a recipe in half and even then it is sometimes too much salt.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2014, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Western Oregon
1,379 posts, read 1,226,156 times
Reputation: 1268
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
OP, I don't think it is your taste buds.

Public taste seems to be moving towards more salt and more sugar.
Yeah the sugar too So many things are ruined with sugar where it doesn't belong, imho.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2014, 05:52 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
11,411 posts, read 13,961,436 times
Reputation: 10924
I don't add any salt in my food either, as most food is salty enough. I have gotten used to eating food with a very light salt content and enjoy it much more. I don't like mustard, so I stay away from it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2014, 08:01 PM
 
25,631 posts, read 29,117,065 times
Reputation: 23049
Get Colemans mustard powder and make your own if the salt bothers you.

I dig the stone ground browns of the mustard world and most brands have less salt than their yellow counterparts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top