U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 04-28-2014, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, QC, Canada
3,402 posts, read 4,230,089 times
Reputation: 4399

Advertisements

What is your experience with producing cheeses like paneer, ricotta, or mozzarella?

I have made paneer using lemon juice and/or vinegar to separate the curd from the whey. Recently I looked in to making mozzarella which seems to require both disolved rennet and citric acid. Does anyone know why? I ordered these items but I'm a bit worried that they just play the same role as vinegar or lemon. Or maybe they give you a greater curd to whey ratio? I would be very much in favour of that.

Also, I would like to try using goat's milk. Is that a good idea?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-28-2014, 06:28 AM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
33,585 posts, read 51,786,623 times
Reputation: 83017
I do at home a farmer style cheese. I don't add any vinegar, or lemon juice - just a spoon or two of plain organic yogurt, kefir, or buttermilk and use RAW milk. ( regular milk is OK too)
For the next batch, I just use the same container with a little bit "sour" milk left in it, or save it as a "starter".
Cookieszonki: Domowy twaróg

The cheese do not look or resemble cottage cheese, but rather a quark. It looks like ricotta, but taste little different. I never use lemon juice or vinegar. To make a cheese you need to add a live cultures.
This kind of cheese in not available to buy in my area (except overpriced in specialty stores)

Yes, you can use goat milk. I just don't have access to it.

Let me know if you need a step-for-step instruction.

Here is a great website about how to make mozzarella:
http://www.cheesemaking.com/Mozz-Culture.html

Interesting fact: the milk with added yogurt/kefir or buttermilk will get sour in 2-3 days when left alone in a warm spot (kitchen counter). BUT if thunderstorm happen at that time, the milk will be sour much faster - usually the same day or next day

Last edited by elnina; 04-28-2014 at 06:53 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2014, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, QC, Canada
3,402 posts, read 4,230,089 times
Reputation: 4399
Hey, cool. My girlfriend showed me quark and I quite liked it but I have never been able to find it in a supermarket here.

So essentially it's like starting yogurt? Heat milk, let it fall to a warm temperature and then stir in? When do you strain it so as to prevent it from becoming full blown yogurt or cream?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2014, 07:38 AM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
33,585 posts, read 51,786,623 times
Reputation: 83017
Essentially you start with making milk... sour, by adding couple spoons of yogurt, kefir or buttermilk. Stir, cover and let it stand till its get more solid. (its ready when you dip in a soup spoon, and the milk stays on it like a soft jello or custard - wobbly but not runny )
Then heat it very, very slow and careful ( ~100F) till it separates. Stir very little if at all.
Place a cotton towel or cheese cloth on the colander and pour the milk through it.
Leave it there till it stops dripping, then wrap it, and place on a plate (with the cloth), cover with another plate and place on the top something heavy, to extract even more of the whey.
How much whey you want to extract depends how you like the cheese - you can leave some to make it soft like quark, or extract more to have it hard and ready to slice. That cheese consistency will resemble a feta cheese.

Last edited by elnina; 04-28-2014 at 07:47 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2014, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,135,059 times
Reputation: 28069
I've been making mozzarella and ricotta cheeses for quite some time - they're great for making truly homemade lasagna. If you use pasteurized milk make sure it isn't "ultra-pasteurized." I use rennet and citric acid as they set the curds quickly and firmly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2014, 08:50 AM
 
25,631 posts, read 29,117,065 times
Reputation: 23049
Little miss muffet sat on a tuffet eating elnina's curds and whey along came a Bulldog and said yummy yum yum gimme some.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top