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Old 03-26-2015, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,501 posts, read 26,116,900 times
Reputation: 26477

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
That's like saying a cold is foodborne because a food prep worker with a cold passed on the virus while assembling your salad, and you picked up the virus from eating the salad.
If you got it from the salad, then it would be food borne. You would be more likely to catch it from touching the container and then your nose or mouth than from the salad itself, though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VJDAY81445 View Post
I have gotten the flu a few times in my life.

Many times I have blamed it on something I ate before because after vomiting, the food is engrained in my mind as being the cause.

Food poisoning?

Nope..............old fashioned stomach flu but my mind blames it on the last food I ate.
"Stomach flu" is another name for viral stomach and intestinal infection. It may come from contaminated food or water or by direct contact with someone who has the virus. "Stomach flu" is not influenza, AKA "flu".

Viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu) Causes - Diseases and Conditions - Mayo Clinic
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Old 03-26-2015, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,178 posts, read 57,317,340 times
Reputation: 52033
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
If you got it from the salad, then it would be food borne.
Um, that's not what "foodborne" means.
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Old 03-26-2015, 10:34 PM
 
Location: Gardenville
759 posts, read 1,036,466 times
Reputation: 1034
As far as the food itself goes, I'd say the possibility of getting poisoned from a fast food joint is probably less than that of being poisoned at a full service, cooked to order, "fresh foods" restaurant. For several reasons-many fast food places do almost no actual "cooking"-rather they just heat up foods. Taco Bell's food for example, all arrives in cry-o-vac'ed bags from the distributor, and is just reheated in a hot water bath for service, a process called sous vide.
Another reason is that most fast food burger joints receive all of their meat products frozen, and "cook" them up from a frozen state. The same goes for pretty much all breaded chicken and fish products, and anything from a fast food place that happens to have grill marks-these are all added at the factory prior to distribution.
The hands touching the food at any stage are another matter entirely, especially when new employees are from countries where standards of hygiene and sanitation are quite different from our own.
I've only been seriously food poisoned once, and I'll never forget it.
It came from the food served at a close friend's wedding reception, which was held in mid- afternoon outdoors in Atlanta in the middle of August. Something was not held or stored at the correct safe temperature-I suspect the chilled steamed shrimp or the horseradish cream for the carved tenderloin. The food was supplied and served by a very well known and long-established caterer.
In any event, I had a great time and thought nothing of eating and drinking heartily at the festive event. I went back to another friend's house to spend the night. At around 4:00 AM, c. 10-12 hours after my last bite, I awoke from a deep slumber, bathed in sweat, my head swimming, and extremely nauseous.
I barely made it to the bathroom before I began uncontrollable projectile vomiting. This was followed almost immediately by violent diarrhea. I alternated between the two, often at the same time, for the next eight hours, unable to leave the bathroom, much to the consternation of my host. Believe me, considering the mess I left, I truly pitied him.
To make matters worse, I had to catch a plane back home that afternoon. That was a truly beyond miserable flight, followed by a nearly two hour drive to my home after arrival at the airport. Thank God I was so dehydrated as to be nearly empty by the time I started driving.
I immediately took to my bed, and tried to rehydrate, but could hold nothing down without bringing it right back up again. This lasted for another 24 hours before it began to get better, and still languished for a day after that. Wouldn't wish it on anyone.
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Old 03-26-2015, 10:35 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,501 posts, read 26,116,900 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Um, that's not what "foodborne" means.
I am having difficulty understanding what you think "foodborne" means. If you catch an infectious disease from consuming a food containing the organism causing that disease, the illness is "foodborne". It does not mean the food itself was spoiled or decomposing. The food may have been perfectly normal (look and taste fine), apart from the presence of the bacteria, virus, fungus, parasite, or toxin that made you sick. Norovirus may be spread from person to person, from contact with contaminated surfaces, or by consuming food containing the virus. It is the most common cause of foodborne ilness. See table 1 here:

About Foodborne Illness | Food Safety | CDC

If you caught a cold from contact with a salad containing a cold virus, that would be foodborne, too. But since cold viruses are adapted to the respiratory system we do not usually catch colds by eating the virus. We catch them by inoculating our noses with them. That is why you would be more likely to catch a cold from a salad by touching the container it was in or perhaps the fork you used to eat it and then touching your nose than by actually ingesting the virus.

Sometimes infections not usually associated with food can be foodborne, such as strept:

An outbreak of food-borne group A Streptococcus (GAS) tonsillopharyngitis among residents of a dormitory. - PubMed - NCBI
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Old 03-26-2015, 11:53 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
1,034 posts, read 981,031 times
Reputation: 1625
I have not eaten much fast food since college but I do remember once eating at taco bell and being sick for the next two days. But thinking back that could have well been just a bad hangover too.
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Old 03-27-2015, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
21,466 posts, read 22,713,045 times
Reputation: 45149
Quote:
Originally Posted by B.K. View Post
It came from the food served at a close friend's wedding reception, which was held in mid- afternoon outdoors in Atlanta in the middle of August. Something was not held or stored at the correct safe temperature-I suspect the chilled steamed shrimp or the horseradish cream for the carved tenderloin. The food was supplied and served by a very well known and long-established caterer.
In any event, I had a great time and thought nothing of eating and drinking heartily at the festive event. I went back to another friend's house to spend the night. At around 4:00 AM, c. 10-12 hours after my last bite, I awoke from a deep slumber, bathed in sweat, my head swimming, and extremely nauseous.
I barely made it to the bathroom before I began uncontrollable projectile vomiting. This was followed almost immediately by violent diarrhea. I alternated between the two, often at the same time, for the next eight hours, unable to leave the bathroom, much to the consternation of my host. Believe me, considering the mess I left, I truly pitied him.
To make matters worse, I had to catch a plane back home that afternoon. That was a truly beyond miserable flight, followed by a nearly two hour drive to my home after arrival at the airport. Thank God I was so dehydrated as to be nearly empty by the time I started driving.
I immediately took to my bed, and tried to rehydrate, but could hold nothing down without bringing it right back up again. This lasted for another 24 hours before it began to get better, and still languished for a day after that. Wouldn't wish it on anyone.
Were any other guests at the wedding affected, or was it just you? Stories like this are why some people are hesitant to believe every food poisoning story. No doubt that you were sick as a dog, but if you were the only person from the reception who had this result it probably wasn't from what you ate.
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Old 03-27-2015, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,306 posts, read 79,490,574 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by melissapla12 View Post
I got sick from Rudy’s BBQ twice!!! I tried it once about 4 years ago and me and my mom both got sick. Last year, I got a breakfast burrito from them (and this was from another Rudy’s) I got sick again! I had to leave work early. Maybe it was my mind playing tricks on me but I did feel awful
I have gotten sick from a few BBQ places but I think, in my case, it has been the preservatives used in the sauce and not spoiled food. In fact this could be the case with a lot of restaurants; chemicals can cause us to have tummy problems. Look at MSG and sulfites, both can cause people to get sick.
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Old 03-27-2015, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,306 posts, read 79,490,574 times
Reputation: 38656
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
It is still considered foodborne.

Food Safety for Moms-to-Be: Medical Professionals - Foodborne Pathogens

Norovirus (Norwalk-like Virus)

Basics: A virus that's becoming a health threat. It may account for a large percent of non-bacterial foodborne illnesses.

Sources: Raw oysters, shellfish, cole slaw, salads, baked goods, frosting, contaminated water, and ice. It can also spread via person-to-person.

Symptoms: Diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, stomach cramps, headache, and fever.

Incubation: 24 to 48 hours after ingestion, but can appear as early as 12 hours after exposure.

Duration: 1 to 3 days
You are totally missing what some are saying: I guess tech you can call anything food borne if food is involved at all, but this isn't the point. I think you have chosen to take a story and spin it to a degree. Not to mention, believe it or not, FDA isn't one of the dept that can be trusted 100%. I don't put a lot into any federal government study.
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Old 03-27-2015, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,501 posts, read 26,116,900 times
Reputation: 26477
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
You are totally missing what some are saying: I guess tech you can call anything food borne if food is involved at all, but this isn't the point. I think you have chosen to take a story and spin it to a degree. Not to mention, believe it or not, FDA isn't one of the dept that can be trusted 100%. I don't put a lot into any federal government study.
How do you define "foodborne" then? It seems you are using a different definition from what the infectious disease experts use.
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Old 03-27-2015, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
21,466 posts, read 22,713,045 times
Reputation: 45149
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
How do you define "foodborne" then? It seems you are using a different definition from what the infectious disease experts use.
I can't speak for nmnita, but I think some people are differentiating between illness caused by a situation like spoiled eggs or dairy or undercooked meats and that caused by food that came into contact with a contaminated vector (if that's the right word,) like a food handler who hasn't washed his or her hands. In the second case, the illness wasn't caused by anything inherent to the food. Sure, it's all bacteria or viruses, but if someone gets the flu from touching a doorknob, they wouldn't say they had "doorknob poisoning."

Last edited by fleetiebelle; 03-27-2015 at 03:19 PM..
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