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Old 04-29-2014, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
38,419 posts, read 18,177,990 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fleetiebelle View Post
I'm originally from Cincinnati, and aside from coneys have never heard of any of these. Maybe this is an East side/West side thing.
I first had "porcupines" at the lunch room at Withrow High School in Cincinnati. John Marzetti was a pot luck favorite at church supper, I don't think it was native to Cincy.....more likely Cleveland or Columbus.


(I found this reference "It is unclear when Marzetti's restaurant first offered the dish, but by the 1920s, it had become popular across Ohio and the Midwest. This was primarily due to the ease of preparation and the tastiness of Johnny Marzetti.

Then the Columbus Public Schools got wind of it and served it in school cafeterias. This made the casserole a staple in schools throughout the state. It remains the No. 1 cafeteria dish fondly remembered and duplicated at home."


Coney Islands were everywhere....diners and chili joints. The Honky Tonk I mentioned was not a dish I had in Ohio.....it was a Maine casserole along with 7 layer dinnner.(a layer of sliced raw potatoes, layer of sliced onions, pound of lean hamburg, 1/2 cup uncooked rice, 1 large can Tomatoes, sliced green pepper celery and mushroom, cover with slices or raw bacon, enough water to come to the top of all the layers.

Layers in a large casserole, salt and pepper as you go, the hamburg is spread over the onions raw, raw rice is sprinkledover hamberg, covered with canned tomatoes, then slices of veggies, lay on the bacon and pour on the water Bake at 350 for 2 hours.
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Old 04-29-2014, 01:56 PM
 
Location: NC
6,081 posts, read 7,023,877 times
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Mexican Hats = fried salami (or bologna)
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Old 04-29-2014, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,126,539 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
Fish eyes and glue is what my mom calls Tapioca pudding..
We call tapioca pudding "frog spawn" because of its textural similarity to a mass of frog eggs.

Speaking of fish eyes - has anyone ever seen or eaten "Stargazey Pie?" It's quite shocking the first time you see it.
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Old 04-29-2014, 02:26 PM
 
Location: USA
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Frog Bellies: pull canned biscuits apart and fry in hot oil, drain and roll in sugar. Also, poke a hole in the middle of a canned biscuit and fry doughnuts. Drain and roll in sugar.
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Old 04-29-2014, 02:58 PM
 
1,107 posts, read 977,463 times
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Anybody ever had S**t on a Shingle? It's basically beef smothered in gravy over toast. Good stuff, Maynard!
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Old 04-29-2014, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Islip,NY
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Chicken Ala King chicken in a cream sauce with peas and carrots served on toast points. That's how my MIL made it and everyone hated it. Goobers: left over bread crumbs mixed with leftover beaten eggs, made into patties and fried. I was taught that by my husband, never waste the eggs and bread crumbs after frying chicken cutlets. Foam seat cushion is what my BIL calls angel food cake LOL. Lincoln logs from an episode of sopranos, It was hot dogs on a bun spread with cream cheese. Ants on a log: celery peanut butter and raisins.
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Old 04-29-2014, 04:20 PM
 
1,266 posts, read 1,443,204 times
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Fun thread! My Mom also made SOS (with hamburger gravy & peas over mashed potatoes instead of toast). Some other wackily named food I grew up with (or tried in my travels) include: pigs in a blanket (sausage link inside a rolled up pancake), cowboy soup (hamburger, potato, onion and garlic soup--my Mom's own recipe), fish eggs (tapioca pudding), Rocky Mountain eggs (egg fried inside a piece of bread), jello poke cake, dump cake, better than sex cake, shoofly pie, snickerdoodles, Scotch eggs, bubble & squeak, spotted dick, Yorkshire pudding and---for good measure to represent my life in Mexico, I should mention pico de gallo (a chunky fresh salsa that literally means "rooster beak").
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Old 04-29-2014, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Islip,NY
16,926 posts, read 19,666,757 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TotallyTam View Post
Fun thread! My Mom also made SOS (with hamburger gravy & peas over mashed potatoes instead of toast). Some other wackily named food I grew up with (or tried in my travels) include: pigs in a blanket (sausage link inside a rolled up pancake), cowboy soup (hamburger, potato, onion and garlic soup--my Mom's own recipe), fish eggs (tapioca pudding), Rocky Mountain eggs (egg fried inside a piece of bread), jello poke cake, dump cake, better than sex cake, shoofly pie, snickerdoodles, Scotch eggs, bubble & squeak, spotted dick, Yorkshire pudding and---for good measure to represent my life in Mexico, I should mention pico de gallo (a chunky fresh salsa that literally means "rooster beak").
I'd like to know what the better than sex cake is.
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Old 04-29-2014, 04:47 PM
 
1,266 posts, read 1,443,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lubby View Post
I'd like to know what the better than sex cake is.
As far as I remember, it's chocolate cake with added chocolate sauce and caramel topped with whipped cream and crumbled toffee. Not sure it's truly better than IT but it's dang good!
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Old 04-29-2014, 04:49 PM
 
Location: The analog world
15,520 posts, read 8,734,436 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chava61 View Post
Egg in the nest meaning the crusts of the bread with a fried egg in the middle.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
We call that one egg in a bonnet at my house
We call that dish a one-eyed soldier, but I've also heard it called a one-eyed sailor. Southern relatives ladled a cheese sauce on top, but we always served ours plain.
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