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Old 04-30-2014, 11:43 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,126,539 times
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I was discussing this topic with some friends and I can't believe how many different ways folks cook this, seemingly simple, summer favorite. Remember, we're using fresh, milky corn that's still in the husk.

Here's how we cook it in our backyard...

Elote Loco

Pull back husk, remove silk, and slather the corn with mayo (I use MW ).
Replace the husk and grill 10-12 minutes (or until the corn has caramelized).
Peel back husk.
Sprinkle with a sharp dry cheese (parmesan, cotija).
Optionally, add dried hot pepper flakes, salt, lime juice.

Bay Corn

Pull back husk and remove silk.
Replace the husk and soak in water ten minutes.
Grill for 10-12 minutes (or until the corn has caramelized).
Peel back husk.
Slather with butter.
Sprinkle generously with Old Bay seasoning.

So... do you have any special recipes for corn-on-the-cob?
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Old 05-01-2014, 12:30 AM
 
Location: Honolulu, Makiki
351 posts, read 435,353 times
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The corn grown in Hawaii is so super sweet and good that I only season it with butter and salt. Here's a newspaper article which features the corn grown here on numbers 3 and 2.

Honolulu Star-Bulletin Features

I know the subject is about fresh corn, but I have to share this cooking technique for cooking frozen corn on the cob. I originally learned this from a friend and then added my own touches to it. Take a pot of one part water, one part milk, add a big pinch of sugar and two pinches of salt and a pat of butter and simmer, cook the frozen corn in that. People swear it's fresh corn and are surprised to learn it's frozen.

Last edited by Honolulu21; 05-01-2014 at 12:41 AM..
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Old 05-01-2014, 01:27 AM
 
33,134 posts, read 39,067,107 times
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When corn is in season usually August to mid September around here i'll go to the local farmers market a couple of times a week where i'll buy a dozen corn bring em home shuck em and put em in boiling water for about 5-6 minutes, then a bit of butter and salt and you got some mighty fine eating.
For the 3-4 ears that dont fit in the pot i'll leave husk on and microwave em for about 8-10 minutes.

Something like this i consider akin to corn blasphemy/
http://info.yummly.com/wp-content/up...on-the-Cob.jpg
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Old 05-01-2014, 01:28 AM
 
35,121 posts, read 37,790,060 times
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We either boil it, steam it or grill it then lightly butter and salt or only butter if the butter itself is salted.
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Old 05-01-2014, 01:49 AM
 
17,157 posts, read 22,161,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
When corn is in season usually August to mid September around here i'll go to the local farmers market a couple of times a week where i'll buy a dozen corn bring em home shuck em and put em in boiling water for about 5-6 minutes, then a bit of butter and salt and you got some mighty fine eating.
For the 3-4 ears that dont fit in the pot i'll leave husk on and microwave em for about 8-10 minutes.

Something like this i consider akin to corn blasphemy/
http://info.yummly.com/wp-content/up...on-the-Cob.jpg
thats about it in these parts too.

now eating the cob has its own musings, i remember going to a couple friends houses, and its like a competition,,,,like watching hungry beavers on a tree branch... they will eat the whole cob, all at once, not setting it down..after its rolled on a stick of butter..


when i went to eat at one of my first girl-friends house, the mother started held the cob upright and started cutting the kernels off... i waited til i saw what the rest of the family did- and they all did this, so, i had to try- and made a huge mess.. ive never seen that before..
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Old 05-01-2014, 05:11 AM
 
33,134 posts, read 39,067,107 times
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People who cut the corn off the cob usually have the same problem i've got - dentures
After a while the kids thought that was a neet idea and wanted their corn cut off the cob as well..
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Old 05-01-2014, 05:32 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,334,463 times
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The most important thing about sweet corn to me, having grown up in one of the major producing regions is that if it's not very freshly picked (as in, minutes from stalk to shucking to starting cooking), it is seriously a mere shadow of itself, tastewise. Obviously, I'll eat it even if it's not freshly picked, but there truly is no comparison, it's night and day. Most produce is best fresh, but corn is the one where the difference is most stark. There really is a very tiny window of perfection.

The purest taste, to me, comes from a quick, boil, essentially a brief hot water bath. Roasting on the grill is okay, but not the best. Salt and real butter, I'm a purist.

I love elote; it's traditional. But it's not MY tradition, so to me, it's more a "corn dish" than my textbook idea of how corn is eaten. In most of the Mexican areas I have lived in or adjacent to, you purchase it from vendors or mercados still on the cob, sometimes on a stick. I just found a carniceria/mercado/panaderia in my current neighborhood, though, that serves it daily at lunch, and they cut it off the cob, mix in the other ingredients, and serve it to you in a cup. At that point, it's like cheesy corn bake. Def. tasty, though.

http://blogs.phoenixnewtimes.com/bel...%20Paquime.jpg
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Old 05-01-2014, 06:10 AM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
25,907 posts, read 34,966,446 times
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Five or six cobs in a Pyrex dish with a couple tablespoons of water, covered and microwaved for 9 or 10 minutes.
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Old 05-01-2014, 06:27 AM
 
11,689 posts, read 16,437,401 times
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Husk and micro in a zip bag. Big sticky on the micro as I tend to forget things are in there when I have a full house.
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Old 05-01-2014, 06:53 AM
 
5,574 posts, read 5,533,769 times
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If just cooking for myself, I throw one or tow cobs with husks on in the microwave for a few minutes. When they're done, I cut off the stalk end and squeeze them out of the husks. No silks. Perfect!

If cooking for a crowd or taking them somewhere like a picnic or tailgating, I throw a bunch of cobs (no husks) in a cooler and pour boiling water over them. They're cooked 30 minutes later, and hold warm until we're ready for them.
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