U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-22-2014, 01:03 AM
 
Location: SoCal
5,708 posts, read 4,282,375 times
Reputation: 1855

Advertisements

@The OP: You can buy some ramen, some other soups which one make easily and quickly, some rice, some curry sauce (to put on the rice), and/or something else which is cheap but tasty.

Also, you can try using the dollar menu or whatever at some fast food places sometimes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-22-2014, 01:21 AM
 
Location: USA
6,171 posts, read 4,952,891 times
Reputation: 10547
I work night shift so my system is always out of wack anyway. I only eat twice a day. First meal is usually a sub or something from the local Italian take-out. Second mean is just a snack I pick up at work. My biggest meal of the week is when I go out on Friday to the local Asian buffet. Eating Italian hoagies, cheesesteaks, and pizza on a rotating basis all week can't be too healthy. I live in a rented room that has no cooking facilities other than a microwave so it's difficult.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-22-2014, 01:23 AM
 
Location: SoCal
5,708 posts, read 4,282,375 times
Reputation: 1855
Quote:
Originally Posted by s1alker View Post
I work night shift so my system is always out of wack anyway. I only eat twice a day. First meal is usually a sub or something from the local Italian take-out. Second mean is just a snack I pick up at work. My biggest meal of the week is when I go out on Friday to the local Asian buffet. Eating Italian hoagies, cheesesteaks, and pizza on a rotating basis all week can't be too healthy. I live in a rented room that has no cooking facilities other than a microwave so it's difficult.
Do you have a water heater?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-22-2014, 05:57 AM
 
2,442 posts, read 1,797,337 times
Reputation: 4644
Quote:
Originally Posted by eureka1 View Post
The fellow who wrote the "Zone" books said a very true thing. MOST PEOPLE ONLY EAT ABOUT TEN DIFFERENT FOOD ITEMS. People get overwhelmed thinking they have to come up with 30 meals for a month; actually most people just rotate among ten or twelve.
This is so true!

I have a list on the fridge of our favourite meals, but the real trick is that by keeping my pantry stocked wth the non-perishables to make them, freezing meat and using the same veg and dairy for everything, I don't need to meal plan. At the end of the week I use up all the unused vegetables in a pasta sauce. Of course, you'll have to figure out what works for you depending on what you like to eat/cook, but I can already see that for breakfast you like bacon, eggs, grits. So you don't need to plan that you'll have this on this day or that day, just buy a packet of bacon, a dozen eggs, a packet of instant grits and a packet of english muffins and there's your week's breakfasts. Each day you can just choose what arrangment you'll eat.

As for learning to cook, youtube! Think of what you like to eat, then google for videos.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-22-2014, 05:59 AM
 
2,442 posts, read 1,797,337 times
Reputation: 4644
Quote:
Originally Posted by s1alker View Post
I work night shift so my system is always out of wack anyway. I only eat twice a day. First meal is usually a sub or something from the local Italian take-out. Second mean is just a snack I pick up at work. My biggest meal of the week is when I go out on Friday to the local Asian buffet. Eating Italian hoagies, cheesesteaks, and pizza on a rotating basis all week can't be too healthy. I live in a rented room that has no cooking facilities other than a microwave so it's difficult.
Do you have a freezer? Trader Joes has dozens of frozen meals which are comparatively healthy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 02:49 AM
 
Location: Kaliforneea
1,210 posts, read 850,893 times
Reputation: 1999
I'll try to say something different. I dunno what you like to eat. That's something you have to figure out. But breakfast should be simple and repeatable. Save your creativity for the dinner meal.

- some people (like my boss) are like old time sailors they can eat the same thing again and again. That drives me nuts. I know I need and like variety. So I actually have to plan ahead or I fall for the take-out/drive-thru/eat out thing too

- cookbooks can be overwhelming. Thick. Dense with small print. But look for one that fits your style. I needed ones with lots of color pictures and large text before I could even consider trying the recipe.

- dont overlook fresh fruit and raw vegetables as a midmorning snack since you dread a light breakfast? I certainly dont have time to make pancakes and sausage and fried eggs on a weekday. (My examples) - baby carrots, cherry tomatoes, sugar snap peas, a banana, raw almonds, an apple - these all travel very easy, and you dont have to cook them, and you can even eat them with one hand and no silverware. Part of what *makes* you want to eat out, is you regret/resent cleaning up?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2014, 07:29 AM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 34,623,814 times
Reputation: 20198
Get:
a rotisserie chicken from the deli/hot department of your supermarket. Around 2.5 pounds: $7
a tub of garlic-mashed potatoes from the deli department. $5.
a bag of Steamers (or store brand) broccoli or mixed veggies from the frozen food aisle. $2
a bag of pre-washed, pre-dried, pre-cut salad mix. Spring mix is better for you than iceburg, romaine if they don't have the spring mix. This might cost as much as $5
a garlic bulb - 40 cents.
a dozen eggs. $4.00 for the extra fancy organic cage free grain fed blah blah, $1.79 for the mundane normal large dozen.
small bottle of olive oil - $4
small bottle of balsamic vinegar - $3
small block of cheese - whatever kind you like in your eggs and on your salad - sharp cheddar's a good staple. $3.00

Shouldn't cost more than $40 for everything above, if you get it on sale, it could be as little as $25.

Using ONLY this stuff - you can have, every single day:

Some manner of eggs every morning, 1 egg or 2, boiled, poached, over easy, scrambled, omelet, with or without cheese.

Some incarnation of that chicken every evening for dinner - some examples:

Chicken with mashed potatoes and steamed veggies. - no gravy necessary but go ahead and pick up one of those silly jars of gravy for $2, you're still eating cheap. Two tablespoons is all you need per dinner.

Chicken breast on your salad, you can even reheat it by chunking it up in a pan with a little olive oil and a clove of that garlic, minced, dump it right on top of the greens, add some shredded cheddar cheese, dress with a smidge more oil and a splash of balsamic vinegar.

Re-heated steamed veggies, stir-fried with half of one side of the chicken breast, some garlic, some olive oil, and finished with a drizzle of vinegar, on a plate.

Chicken and eggs - shave the dark meat off the thigh and leg, mix in with some scrambled eggs and add a teaspoon of that jarred gravy for southern-style (eggs aren't just for breakfast don't forget).

Get creative with those frozen veggies. You can get peas with mushrooms in a light sauce, I think Green Giant makes that combo. Those can go right on top of your salad, or stir-fried with the chicken and a couple packets of soy sauce you have hidden in your drawer in the kitchen (I don't know of anyone who doesn't have at least a couple of those somewhere that they've forgotten about - the stuff doesn't EVER go bad).

So for under $50 per week, you have lunches and dinners for 7 days, AND the ability to eat a variety of menu selections, even with only two main ingredients (chicken and eggs). It's also a minimum of cooking, because you're buying the chicken ready-to-eat and hot from the supermarket's rotisserie, and only cutting it up to serve leftovers for the rest of the week.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top