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View Poll Results: Country ham - love it or hate it?
I love it 31 56.36%
I hate it 8 14.55%
It's okay 16 29.09%
Voters: 55. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-21-2014, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Kalamalka Lake, B.C.
2,966 posts, read 3,762,829 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulldogdad View Post
LOVE IT especially when it's also smoked. I'm talking about the true SALT ONLY cured and dry aged for months country hams.
just like grandma used to make.
It's getting extremely difficult to source real ham and bacon now.

Grandparents always raised four pigs; two to recover your costs, one for trading, and one for your own family use. It's due for a return.
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Old 05-21-2014, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Floribama
13,496 posts, read 29,444,231 times
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I'm not a big ham lover. I like it cooked in greens or lima beans, but I can't eat a big slice of it.
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Old 05-21-2014, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
8,144 posts, read 7,469,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
It's a dry-cured ham. It has a distinctive flavor and might be considered a little on the salty side. Down here, in Dixie, it's a common breakfast item - often served with "red-eye gravy" or on a biscuit.
I'm curious as to where you are 'in Dixie'.

I'm from the deep south of South Carolina and country ham isn't as prevalent as it is in other places.

For me, we didn't grow up eating country ham. Sausage and gravy biscuits.

Country ham is too damn salty. We cook the entire pig.
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Old 05-21-2014, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Dallas
5,463 posts, read 4,579,619 times
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I never knew there was a difference between country ham and city ham until I moved to Mississippi. I found country ham was delicious the one time I tried it. I no longer eat any pork products, though.
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Old 05-21-2014, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,187 posts, read 10,136,018 times
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I can't believe that no one has mentioned soaking the ham before cooking. This is an absolute necessty with a country (salt cured) ham.

First, rinse off the ham and remove any mold with a brush. Then place it in a big enough pot to cover it completely. Fill the pot with cold water and let it soak for six to eight hours. Change the water and repeat the soaking. Depending upon the degree of saltiness a ham requires 24-48 hours to soak. After soaking you may bake it. In the old days, however, it was common to first boil the ham, then bake it.
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Old 05-21-2014, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Oceania
8,623 posts, read 5,894,991 times
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"Country" ham refers to curing a ham in the tradition of a Smithfield ham. All country hams may be called Smithfield but a true Smithfield ham must come from Smithfield, VA. Salting meat was the way 'country' people preserved it hundreds of years ago and we still have the infamous ham. Hocks are good as well. People use salt meat for flavor while cooking. We are talking true country cooking now.

"Regular" or "city" ham is "fresh" or "picnic" ham. It is the ham most people are familiar with as they are served at Christmas or Easter.

I live in MD and learned the difference as a kid. As far as for a breakfast item, scrapple goes over better here. I don't know where you can get red eye gravy around here. I think a lot of it is myth.

If you want a real treat try some stuffed ham, a southern MD culinary treat.
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Old 05-21-2014, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,135,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by armory View Post
...I don't know where you can get red eye gravy around here. I think a lot of it is myth...
Our breakfast diners must be mythical because you can certainly get red-eye gravy here in North Alabama.
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Old 05-21-2014, 01:09 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,135,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blueherons View Post
I'm curious as to where you are 'in Dixie'...
I'm in North Alabama and country ham is everywhere here - diners, restaurants, convenience stores, grocery stores, supermarkets, and sometimes on the side of the road.
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Old 05-21-2014, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,135,059 times
Reputation: 28069
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
I can't believe that no one has mentioned soaking the ham before cooking. This is an absolute necessty with a country (salt cured) ham...
It's not soaked around here - just sliced, cooked, and served.
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Old 05-21-2014, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
8,144 posts, read 7,469,555 times
Reputation: 17054
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
I'm in North Alabama and country ham is everywhere here - diners, restaurants, convenience stores, grocery stores, supermarkets, and sometimes on the side of the road.
It must be more regional. Growing up in the Low Country of South Carolina, you can find country or Smithfield ham, you just don't eat it a lot.

We cook a whole pig for any occasion. Maybe that's why we don't do the ham as much.

Now my Charleston grandmother made head cheese all the time

I agree that redeye gravy isn't mythical.
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