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Old 05-22-2014, 04:13 PM
 
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I use Prosciutto often but rarely have it alone. It is delicious added to a sub sandwich (hogie), it is also delicious sauteed in butter with onion and tossed over asparagus or bussels sprouts. I also use it in a baked rigatoni dish I make that is spectacular.
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Old 05-22-2014, 04:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaofan View Post
If you don't like prosciutto, there is no earthly reason why you should buy it. Just leave it for the people who can appreciate it. Worrying about what other people buy is pointless. If you don't understand why people like it, all the explanation in the world will not help.

Uh, I bought "some" because I wanted others that have never had it to try it too. And, I certainly will leave it for those who can "appreciate" it. lol

Also, I don't worry about what other people buy. If you think it's pointless then you, like I, are entitled to our opinions.

My post was a reaction to something I never had tried in my life. You're right though....an explanation from you would go in one ear and out the other. My not liking it is as valid as someone gushing over it. One just not as flowery as the other. It's a forum...

I have appreciated some of the suggestions and ideas from others. Perhaps I'll cook the rest up and see how that goes...mixing it with some of the ideas here. Lastly, I considered it a "snobby" thing based on the price.

Last edited by oldtoiletsmkgdflrpots; 05-22-2014 at 04:36 PM..
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Old 05-22-2014, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
10,117 posts, read 16,713,055 times
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I didn't like it the first time I had it. Like many "gourmet" foods, it's a bit of an acquired taste. I also agree with some of the others that it's best served as a component of a dish. My husband would happily eat it plain off the antipasto platter though.

There's a nearby Italian restaurant that makes a to-die-for spinach salad.

Baby spinach, big Gorgonzola crumbles, toasted walnuts, strawberries, and balsamic vinaigrette. They serve it with a few pieces of prosciutto rolled up on top.

I haven't been there in too long!
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Old 05-22-2014, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
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A lot of food is like this though. If you didn't grow up eating it, you haven't developed a taste for it, so it's often a bit funky when you first try it. I wouldn't consider myself a food snob, but I've moved around a bunch, so have been exposed to a lot of different food types and national/territorial cuisines.

I remember the first time I had grits with eggs, sausage and cheese I thought it was weird... porridge type stuff is supposed to be sweet, right?! But, I love it now. However, okra is just nasty no matter how it's prepared LOL.

Plus, some of the more "gourmet" international foods are poorly replicated locally and don't have anywhere near the taste or texture of the "real thing". I've had some truly atrocious American "proscuitto" that tasted like soap and felt like kraft paper. YUCK!
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Old 05-22-2014, 04:44 PM
 
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Prosciutto is overrated
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Old 05-22-2014, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Montreal, Quebec
15,087 posts, read 11,517,515 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtoiletsmkgdflrpots View Post
Ok, so I'm at the deli at HEB today and saw a hunk of meat called "prosciutto". It's on sale mind you for twenty something a pound. Jokingly in my mind I'm thinkin..."wow, what a deal!" The gal before me was getting samples of it and she kept exclaiming how good it was. I think she ate 10 bucks worth before it was my turn.

I asked a couple of other gals waiting in line if they knew what kind of meat it was. No one seemed to know. That made me feel better. So I tried a sample as I've never had it before...and I'm old. End result...what is the big deal? It's really, really chewy...I thought I'd choke before I masticated enough. I kept wanting to gag. I bought a few slices for the crew at home to see their reaction, (probably about two dollars worth...sliced see-through thin). It did kinda taste like cheese though...chewy cheese, that is.

I did ask the meat guy what it is and he said it's pork. I'm still not sure which part of the animal it is so I better google that. The label says Italy so I guess the pigs there must be awfully well taken care of at twenty something a pound. The best part of the whole deal is in the asking..."ah, excuse me...may I have a few slices of the prosciutto?" It's an opportunity to act like a snob. However, the experience isn't worth twenty something a pound...on sale.

Please tell me what is so special about it?
Mmmm...prosciutto. It's very special, but I don't expect someone named Old Toilets to get it.
It's not about an opportunity to act like a snob. It's delicious.
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Old 05-22-2014, 05:20 PM
 
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Prosciutto is so expensive because, like in many air-dried curing processes, the meat loses much of its water weight. So, if you bought fresh ham at $5/lb, you would have to expect air cured product which loses over 1/2 of its moisture weight to cost at least double. The other $10 goes to the process.

Quote:
I have appreciated some of the suggestions and ideas from others. Perhaps I'll
cook the rest up and see how that goes
Honestly, if you don't like it, just leave it. However my guess is that, if you had to chew it much at all, the product was bad or sliced way too thick. The fact that you're even talking about "cooking it up" means that it probably is. Prosciutto di Parma is usually sliced about 1/64-1/32" thick and eaten fresh either by itself or with a simple pairing like fruit or bread. If you do cook it, fry it and use it as a crumble over salad or a pasta with creamier sauce (like alfredo or carbonara). It also pairs very well with cheeses, olives, pickled vegetables, and grainy mustards along with red wine -- which brings me to a point: when you open a bottle of Bordeaux, you shouldn't be expecting grape juice. The same goes with prosciutto and plain old sugar cured, smoked ham.
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Old 05-22-2014, 05:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weltschmerz View Post
Mmmm...prosciutto. It's very special...
It's not about an opportunity to act like a snob. It's delicious.
Absolutely. I've known it all my life as my grandparents were poor Italian immigrants (most definitely not snobs). I have more of an appreciation for it and its other cured relatives now than I ever have.
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Old 05-22-2014, 05:54 PM
 
14,790 posts, read 13,477,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleveland_Collector View Post
Absolutely. I've known it all my life as my grandparents were poor Italian immigrants (most definitely not snobs). I have more of an appreciation for it and its other cured relatives now than I ever have.
exactly, I have memories of my grandfather slicing prosciutto and us grandkids hovering like it was santa claus, lol. Definitely not snobs.

Prosciutto and lamb. two reasons I could never be a vegetarian.
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Old 05-22-2014, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by artemis agrotera View Post
exactly, I have memories of my grandfather slicing prosciutto and us grandkids hovering like it was santa claus, lol. Definitely not snobs.

Prosciutto and lamb. two reasons I could never be a vegetarian.
LOL - pork whether it's ham, sausage, bacon, roasts or chops... the big reason I could never be Jewish or vegetarian
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