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Old 05-30-2014, 12:47 AM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,374,340 times
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Yup, Paleo (and early Neo) diets were predominantly animal protein and fats. High calorie food was hard enough to come by that you would waste as little as possible. Paleo had a relatively small amount of foraged carbs (fruit, veg, grain) and plant protein/fat (mostly nuts and seeds). You'd expend more calories during the gathering than you actually got from the gathered if you tried to survive solely on these in the wild, unless there a lot of these plants all close together and in season and not diseased or eaten by animals.

Early Neo had more fruit and veg with the advent of ag, but grains still weren't nearly as center stage as they are now... grain is temperamental and it takes a large amount of space to grow enough plants to yield any significant amount.

I seriously doubt early farmers were eating +30% of their calories plant-based, and then more root vegs and fruits than grain. It's easier management and more calorie efficient to let the animals eat the plants (on their own as much as possible!) and then eat the animal products. Seriously, there is no way we'd be eating as much grain-based foods if we didn't have major technology, growing and processing grain in large quantities is HARD work!
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Old 05-30-2014, 12:54 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Philosophizer View Post
I'm cheating. I won't be giving up dairy (though I have switched to organic skim and fat free mozzarella). I'll continue to incorporate red potatoes into my diet (controversial, I know, but I find it hypocritical that potatoes are excluded by some, given the whole philosophy behind the diet). Ezekiel bread over less healthy alternatives. Olive oil and butter will be cooking staples. Maybe even some rice occasionally just for the sake variety. Five michelob ultras left in the fridge. I'm really gunna miss beer. My new drink of choice when socially drinking will be bourbon on ice (oh no! It's made from corn). And when my sweet tooth hits, I will indulge in a piece of dark chocolate.

I'm not fat by any means. 6'1 and 187 pounds as of this morning. Never had any issues with gluten (at least that I'm aware of). Just trying to make some lifestyle changed now that will pay dividends when I'm 40 and beyond. I like the basic principles behind the diet. There's a lot of merit in giving up processed food/empty calories that make up so much of the typical American diet. I'm an avid hunter, so securing lean meat is the easiest part, and when you harvest four deer a year, it obviously becomes a dietary staple. Throw in an occasional wild pig and all I lack is something with feathers. But chicken is easy to find at the grocery store and one of the cheapest of all the meats (even raised organically).

Anyone else follow or plan on following a modified paleo diet?
Have you tried the Michelob Ultra Amber? That is our go to beer right now when we go camping.
When we go camping is the only time we drink and we don't go camping often and there are times when we bring the fresh six pack of bottles home with us because we did not drink them while camping.

As far as the Paleo or any other organized plan, no I have never tried it. About 20 years ago I changed my entire lifestyle, diet included on my own and haven't regretted it. I still eat what I want, when I want I just don't eat as much as I used to.
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Old 05-30-2014, 07:52 AM
 
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Originally Posted by MissingAll4Seasons View Post
True, I guess I'm more Neolithic than Paleaolithic .

Still in those early days of agriculture, a good portion of the diet was still hunted and gathered, and pretty sure everything from the farm was eaten pretty much how it grew with just some basic seasoning, salting/drying and fermenting.
It's amazing how quickly humans went from non-ag to ag, all around the world at almost exactly the same time. I agree with an earlier point that you made (I think it was you) that eating paleo is essentially eating as less processed as possible... so that could definitely be extended to the milk thing... even homogenization is supposed to drastically reduce the enzymes that can help you digest the milk. Pasteurization is a big no no as it kills all the good Lactobacillus bacteria that live in milk. Fermentation was done then using the natural bacteria already in the milk, not like today where they kill everything off by pasteurization and then add back in a few commercial variety bacteria for fermentation -- usually two species instead of dozens that are contained in non-pasteurized milk.
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Old 05-30-2014, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,374,340 times
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Originally Posted by freepelican View Post
It's amazing how quickly humans went from non-ag to ag, all around the world at almost exactly the same time. I agree with an earlier point that you made (I think it was you) that eating paleo is essentially eating as less processed as possible... so that could definitely be extended to the milk thing... even homogenization is supposed to drastically reduce the enzymes that can help you digest the milk. Pasteurization is a big no no as it kills all the good Lactobacillus bacteria that live in milk. Fermentation was done then using the natural bacteria already in the milk, not like today where they kill everything off by pasteurization and then add back in a few commercial variety bacteria for fermentation -- usually two species instead of dozens that are contained in non-pasteurized milk.
Unfortunately, it seems that some of the more modern methods devised for food safety and preservation aren't necessarily the best for the actual benefits of actually eating the food. Pasteurizing, homogenizing, skimming and (re)fortifying milk is just one prime example. It's a balance between rendering a food "safe" and having a detrimental impact on the health/nutritional benefits... it's a shame that our society seems to favor way overbalanced to the "safe" side over the "nutritious" side.

Paleo and similar ancestral/hereditary eating regimens all stress eating things that our bodies are designed to digest and utilize, fresh in season as much as possible, and as minimally processed as possible... in the percentages, quantities and frequencies that our biological predecessors would have consumed them. It makes logical sense to eat the foods that our early ancesters were eating because that's how our gut, with all it's microflora and fauna, evolved to perform.
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Old 05-30-2014, 11:02 PM
 
642 posts, read 910,249 times
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Good points above -- wish I stuck to is as loyally as I now I should -- but I do way better than I used to. Not so sure I'd consider modern methods safer though. I could easily argue the other way. There's more pathogenic outbreaks in pasteurized foods than in naturally fermented ones. It would be difficult to quantify but I'm also betting better health returns on the old fashioned methods of preservation.
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Old 05-31-2014, 03:22 PM
Status: "Now it won't stop raining!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: "Arlen" Texas
2,318 posts, read 1,447,209 times
Reputation: 8993
Most of these diets, paleo, south beach, mediterranean, all seem to have one thing in common. Fewer carbs!
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