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Old 06-14-2014, 12:23 AM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,130,341 times
Reputation: 28069

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Albert_The_Crocodile View Post
...As others have suggested, if paying an extra 5% becomes so significant that we have to consciously consider whether we can afford to pay it, then that (to me) is a sign that we need to seriously question whether we can afford to eat out at all...
What if the "government" instituted a 5% "service tax" or restaurants decided to collect a 5% "service fee?" Would you give-up your earnings so freely? I think tips are meant to make the consumers pay for a service the restaurant owners don't feel is worthy of a guaranteed salary.

 
Old 06-14-2014, 12:34 AM
 
4,424 posts, read 5,205,303 times
Reputation: 6479
Ive been a server before and on average a $3 to $5 is what we got from each table. So unless it was a gratuity we hardly ever saw 20 or even 15 percent.
 
Old 06-14-2014, 03:14 AM
 
Location: U.S.A., Earth
4,342 posts, read 2,609,796 times
Reputation: 3809
I will admit that having to tip in general has a lot to do with how much less I eat out, and has driven me to go to over the counter service place where tipping is much less expected.

And I've heard that if service wasn't great, consider it may be outside the server's control, like slow cooks. Also, it's better to talk to the manager about it. If you tip lower, they won't know if it's something they did, or if that's what you normally tip.
 
Old 06-14-2014, 03:19 AM
 
35,121 posts, read 37,802,296 times
Reputation: 61840
Quote:
Originally Posted by ackmondual View Post
It varies per situation... whether or no I'm working, if I'm still within my outside food budget, social calls, using up coupons/taking advantage of other discounts, but given all variables equal, I found myself eating out much less (gradually) ever since the new tipping norm went from 15% to 20%. Anybody else find themselves doing the same thing?

Some people say to eat out as much as I did and to just tip at/around 15% then, as if you eat out less, that's still less tip they're getting in the end. However, I'd rather do it the other way... go out less and tip at the new 20% instead. I figured those it affects would appreciate this more. I know an "old timer" who still remembers when a 10% was the norm and he had a similar reaction as I did.
Tipping has not affected when we dine out which is usually not a lot however lately it has been much more than normal.
We also have never tipped the socially mandated percentage, we tip as we feel necessary according to service given and we usually tip very well.
 
Old 06-14-2014, 07:20 AM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
6,959 posts, read 12,375,199 times
Reputation: 29138
If the service is exceptional we may tip $4. Most of the time it's $3. But then we don't go to any of the "nicer" places to eat. We're more of a Huddle House (kind of like Waffle House but 100 times better) and local restaurant couple. If we're in the mood our bill is close to $30. Most of the time under $20. I don't go by any percentage. Never have, never will.
 
Old 06-14-2014, 07:25 AM
 
Location: Squirrel Hill PA
1,864 posts, read 1,740,952 times
Reputation: 3797
I always tip at least 20% and have done so for a lot of years. But the I also worked in the food industry for many years and know what it is really like to try to make any sort of decent living at it. Service has to be really really bad for me to tip less and I have only ever once had service so bad that I tipped nothing. Servers have families they need to pay their bills too. It isn't their fault the industry works the way it does.
 
Old 06-14-2014, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Texas
42,203 posts, read 49,753,916 times
Reputation: 66975
Quote:
Originally Posted by pythonis View Post
I tip based on performance, not a chart.
Agreed.
 
Old 06-14-2014, 07:31 AM
 
3,205 posts, read 2,812,336 times
Reputation: 9265
I don't want a guaranteed tip on my bill. In my experience, those servers are usually the worst or the restaurant has other problems that impede service.

I was a waitress in times when 10-15% was considered good so I sometimes see an expected 20% as greedy. I do tend to tip more towards 20% or a little above for excellent service. I tip around 15% for adequate. You get a $1 and a talk with your manager if you're bad. I mainly only eat out at local, non-chain restaurants these days. These people usually work really hard to provide food and atmosphere above the norm. They get nice tips.
 
Old 06-14-2014, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Arizona
5,577 posts, read 4,782,672 times
Reputation: 16482
Quote:
Originally Posted by ackmondual View Post
I will admit that having to tip in general has a lot to do with how much less I eat out, and has driven me to go to over the counter service place where tipping is much less expected.

And I've heard that if service wasn't great, consider it may be outside the server's control, like slow cooks. Also, it's better to talk to the manager about it. If you tip lower, they won't know if it's something they did, or if that's what you normally tip.
If you sit at the counter the same tip should be paid.

If I sit at a table alone, when a counter is available, I tip more since I am taking up a table that could have 2 or 4 people sitting at it.

My average breakfast, the meal I eat out the most, is $5.40 with tax. I leave $7 on the table, or should I say counter. I get great service.
 
Old 06-14-2014, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,275 posts, read 79,447,244 times
Reputation: 38635
Quote:
Originally Posted by ackmondual View Post
It varies per situation... whether or no I'm working, if I'm still within my outside food budget, social calls, using up coupons/taking advantage of other discounts, but given all variables equal, I found myself eating out much less (gradually) ever since the new tipping norm went from 15% to 20%. Anybody else find themselves doing the same thing?

Some people say to eat out as much as I did and to just tip at/around 15% then, as if you eat out less, that's still less tip they're getting in the end. However, I'd rather do it the other way... go out less and tip at the new 20% instead. I figured those it affects would appreciate this more. I know an "old timer" who still remembers when a 10% was the norm and he had a similar reaction as I did.
Well I certainly must be an old timer cause I too, remember 10% and probably a lot of people didnt' tip at all. Of course that still is the case, but not as common as it was 50 years ago. I was taught from a very young child to tip: even as a teen ager I did. Many of my friends thought I had a screw loose. Now, do we eat out as much? Yes, but we do not always tip 20%. It depends on the situation; we are more inclined to tip about 18%. Sometimes we do 20.
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