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Old 06-16-2014, 08:13 PM
 
23,909 posts, read 31,137,585 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jay5835 View Post
Why do loaf pans exist for making cakes? I've never made one I've liked as much as the ones I bake in regular (8, 9, or 10" round) cake pans.
A 6x3 pan IS a round pan.
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Old 06-16-2014, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Sunny Florida
7,136 posts, read 10,669,713 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
A 6x3 pan IS a round pan.
It sounds like you followed the recipe, so I think the problem may have been the cake pan you used. A 6 inch by 3 inch pan is tough. You may want to use a bundt pan in the future to make sure the center gets done and the outside isn't overdone.
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Old 06-16-2014, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,498 posts, read 26,102,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maila View Post
All, I love baking and have been baking cakes since a long time. But for the first time yesterday, I baked a cake in 6' by 3' cake pan. According to the website, I needed to use 3 cups of flour and bake in 350 D for 45 minutes.

I did exactly the same. However, after taking the cake out, it was deep brown (getting close to being burnt) on the outside and raw on the core.

The batter overflowed in the oven making a big mess.
I followed the instructions to the T in terms of baking soda etc.I just dont understand what went wrong.

can someone please advise me so that i know? I wanted to make a double layer cake.
Could we see the full recipe, please?

Pan sizes with their volumes:

http://thebakingpan.com/baking-pan-sizes/
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Old 06-17-2014, 06:14 AM
 
1,137 posts, read 1,883,678 times
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Your pan was the wrong pan for a double layer cake.

Most double layer cakes are made in two separate pans. They are not baked in one high pan and then sliced in half. What you do find are people who bake a single layer and then slice that in half. But the single layer is not thick to begin with.

The higher the pan, the longer it takes to bake the interior/middle of the cake because it takes longer for the heat to penetrate the middle of the batter.

That's why bundt cake pans have a well in the middle.

People will use 6x3 pans for cheesecakes or other special cakes like fruitcakes that are often baked in a bain marie (which is basically a larger pot or pan of water and the moisture prevents the cake from burning).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maila View Post
All, I love baking and have been baking cakes since a long time. But for the first time yesterday, I baked a cake in 6' by 3' cake pan. According to the website, I needed to use 3 cups of flour and bake in 350 D for 45 minutes.

I did exactly the same. However, after taking the cake out, it was deep brown (getting close to being burnt) on the outside and raw on the core.

The batter overflowed in the oven making a big mess.
I followed the instructions to the T in terms of baking soda etc.I just dont understand what went wrong.

can someone please advise me so that i know? I wanted to make a double layer cake.
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Old 06-17-2014, 07:51 AM
 
1,167 posts, read 1,039,614 times
Reputation: 2136
The type of the pan (stainless steel vs. aluminum vs. light non-stick vs. dark non-stick, vs ceramic or glass etc.) will make a big difference in how evenly something cooks, as well.

As others have said though, the size of the pan and the amount of batter was the most likely culprit this time around.
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Old 06-17-2014, 09:34 AM
 
1,034 posts, read 1,051,951 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
Post the recipe that you used.

I would say that 3.5 cups of batter is simply too much for that size pan.


And this site says the same:
Party Cake Baking Time and Batter Amounts - 3 in. Deep Pans
Here is the recipe:

2 cup white sugar
1 cup butter
4 eggs
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
3.5 cups all-purpose flour
3 teaspoons baking soda
1 cup milk
A friend of mine posted in her personal blog. I am starting to think it should have been baking powder and not baking soda.
But Wiltons say that 3 cups was ok. I know, I used a little bit more, but the disaster could not have been due to the batter alone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by weezycom View Post
I agree with Hedgehog Mom -- with a pan that deep, you absolutely need a heating core in the center of the cake so it will cook evenly.
I am going to see where I can find the heating core. Walmart should have it right?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunnydee View Post
It sounds like you followed the recipe, so I think the problem may have been the cake pan you used. A 6 inch by 3 inch pan is tough. You may want to use a bundt pan in the future to make sure the center gets done and the outside isn't overdone.
Ya, I wanted the double layer cake, so coulndt use bunt pan.
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Could we see the full recipe, please?

Pan sizes with their volumes:

TheBakingPan | Baking Pan Sizes
I posted the recipe above.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallybalt View Post
Your pan was the wrong pan for a double layer cake.

Most double layer cakes are made in two separate pans. They are not baked in one high pan and then sliced in half. What you do find are people who bake a single layer and then slice that in half. But the single layer is not thick to begin with.

The higher the pan, the longer it takes to bake the interior/middle of the cake because it takes longer for the heat to penetrate the middle of the batter.

That's why bundt cake pans have a well in the middle.

People will use 6x3 pans for cheesecakes or other special cakes like fruitcakes that are often baked in a bain marie (which is basically a larger pot or pan of water and the moisture prevents the cake from burning).
Thank you. I thought it would just be easier to bake this way and cut the cake in half. But isnt there anyway we can bake a cake and cut into two? I mean, say if i want to make a 3 tired cake, I need to bake 6 cakes?!
Quote:
Originally Posted by ozgal View Post
The type of the pan (stainless steel vs. aluminum vs. light non-stick vs. dark non-stick, vs ceramic or glass etc.) will make a big difference in how evenly something cooks, as well.

As others have said though, the size of the pan and the amount of batter was the most likely culprit this time around.
I used aluminium Ozgal.
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Old 06-17-2014, 09:54 AM
 
1,167 posts, read 1,039,614 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maila View Post


Thank you. I thought it would just be easier to bake this way and cut the cake in half. But isnt there anyway we can bake a cake and cut into two? I mean, say if i want to make a 3 tired cake, I need to bake 6 cakes?!
It depends on the depth of the tiers and the height of the total cake. Sometimes it's easier to bake a single cake and cut it in half, but other times it's just easier to bake separate layers, level and then stack them. If I'm doing a square cake for example, I find it far easier to spread the batter into a half sheet cake pan and then cut it up and stack into layers afterward.

It's usually just easier to divide your batter between pans and cook them thinner than to mess with deeper pans and trying to cut them evenly in half. It's not really anymore work (other than clean up) to divide the batter up and factor the cooking time depending on any adjustments made to the pan size/depth from the original recipe.
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Old 06-17-2014, 11:38 AM
 
Location: SLC, UT
1,571 posts, read 2,153,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maila View Post
Thank you. I thought it would just be easier to bake this way and cut the cake in half. But isnt there anyway we can bake a cake and cut into two? I mean, say if i want to make a 3 tired cake, I need to bake 6 cakes?!
If you want a cake with three layers, you just bake three cakes. If you want a cake with six layers, you can bake three cakes and slice each layer in half.

For a two layer cake, you really need to bake two cakes. Your pan was too small, which is why it bubbled over. When you see cake makers splitting cakes, they're splitting a normal sized cake to make two small layers, not splitting a really thick cake to make two normal sized layers.
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Old 06-17-2014, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,498 posts, read 26,102,510 times
Reputation: 26471
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maila View Post
Here is the recipe


A friend of mine posted in her personal blog. I am starting to think it should have been baking powder and not baking soda.
But Wiltons say that 3 cups was ok. I know, I used a little bit more, but the disaster could not have been due to the batter alone.

I am going to see where I can find the heating core. Walmart should have it right?


Ya, I wanted the double layer cake, so coulndt use bunt pan.

I posted the recipe above.

Thank you. I thought it would just be easier to bake this way and cut the cake in half. But isnt there anyway we can bake a cake and cut into two? I mean, say if i want to make a 3 tired cake, I need to bake 6 cakes?!

I used aluminium Ozgal.

You have to remember that 3 cups refers to the total amount of batter, not just the flour. When you add the total ingredients, you have over 7.5 cups of batter. What pan did the recipe suggest using?

Was the pan full to the brim when you put it in the oven? If so, there was no room for the cake to rise. That's why it overflowed. It was not done in the middle because it needed more baking time.

When people cut layers in half, they are usually going to make two or three layers and turn them into four or six thin layers. Cutting layers in half is tricky to get them level.* For two layers it is much easier to just use two pans.

*How to Cut a Cake Layer in Half: 6 Steps - wikiHow
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Old 06-17-2014, 01:19 PM
 
1,137 posts, read 1,883,678 times
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You posted the list of ingredients but you didn't post the full recipe including the instructions. What did the recipe say about baking the cake? Did the recipe actually say pour the batter into a single pan and then slice it into two layers afterwards?

All traditional two or three layer cake recipes I've ever baked have explicitly stated either two or three pans because you're baking two or three separate layers. The list of ingredients you provided looks standard for a typical two layer cake, which should be baked into two 9' pans.

As others have mentioned, it's too risky to bake one very thick single layer cake with the intention of turning it into a 2 or 3 layer cake.

I will say it's interesting your recipe called for baking soda. Most traditional layer cake recipes call for baking powder, not soda. I read somewhere that baking soda is only called for in recipes that include an acid, such as using buttermilk instead of milk, which is what most cakes use. Even if you do use baking soda, you really don't need more than 1/4 tsp of baking soda per cup of flour, so you added way too much baking soda.

The actual truth is that you don't need baking soda or powder for cake if you whip the butter/sugar/cream batter long enough before adding the flour/milk. The longer whipping time adds sufficient air to your cake and helps makes it fluffy. Then gently fold in the flour. You do not want to overheat the flour as that will toughen the cake.
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