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Old 06-24-2014, 10:54 AM
 
Location: North Oakland
8,835 posts, read 8,173,387 times
Reputation: 13337

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SATX56 View Post
Myself and a large party of other ate at Longhorn Steak House a few days ago. All steaks went back regardless of doneness requested. It looked like the St Valentine's Day massacre. They were returned more than once.
Well, it was Longhorn.
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Old 06-24-2014, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Austin
668 posts, read 460,120 times
Reputation: 887
Quote:
Originally Posted by SATX56 View Post
Well, I'd say you're doing the restaurant industry great harm by exposing this if true. Reading the "tipping" threads is a real eye opener for those of us who go out to eat often. As patrons I think we all expect to be served the same quality/cut of meat regardless of what degree of doneness we wish it cooked. Not having some grisly, nasty, veiny, trimmings substituted as you described. I myself order steaks differently all the time. Why? Because it's rare when a chef cooks one properly as requested. Myself and a large party of other ate at Longhorn Steak House a few days ago. All steaks went back regardless of doneness requested. It looked like the St Valentine's Day massacre. They were returned more than once. Longhorn likely lost our business for a long time to come over that.

I've had excellent tender steaks cooked well and tough as a boot steaks cooked rare or med rare. The cut and it's aging, preparation etc and the chef's abilities are the difference. I believe it's possibly an excuse for the inability to judge doneness that rarer steaks are promoted. Like I said we patrons are the boss not you chef's. You're supposed to have some cooking talents ...use them. Restaurants shouldn't have grisly garbage around unless they do business with crap butchers or suppliers. Maybe it's what you feed the poor little children. I for one would know the difference. I'm simply tired of hearing all these stories of what restaurant employees do behind the scenes.
As I have been saying, it is commonly known practice. It's not just BK and me saying it - it has even been written about. Anthony Bourdain's first book, Kitchen Confidential, also talked about it. Why do you think that book blew up, and made him such a star? Because those of us either currently or formerly in the industry loved it and ate it up, because it hits so close to home.

And again, as for the part of your post that I boldened - if you eat out at non mass-chain restaraunts and order well done, this has been done repeatedly to you over the years so apparently you can't tell the difference. Also, I will repeat what I said earlier - what we refer to as these poor/misplaced cuts, are still likely superior to anything that you buy at home. These are generally US Prime or similar very high grade steaks, often dry aged. Yes they are poorer end cuts/pieces that are less than ideal, but when a good chef finishes with it, it will still be better than what you do at home and obviously you don't notice it.

SO ... you get your overcooked leather the way you want it, we get rid of cuts we wouldn't otherwise sell, and thus keep down our food cost percenteges, and everyone is happy ... enjoy.
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Old 06-24-2014, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Matthews, NC
14,693 posts, read 22,468,440 times
Reputation: 14290
Medium rare.

I find it interesting that people are arrogant enough to judge others tastes based on how they like their meat cooked. For those who mock someone for getting their steak well done, I'm sure there's something that you do that the subject of your mockery would find equally horrifying.
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Old 06-24-2014, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
11,048 posts, read 11,460,740 times
Reputation: 17206
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
And what's wrong with that?

I like my steak like I like my oysters - raw.
I had a girlfriend once who offered to fix steak tartare. I told her before I ate any raw meat I wanted to know where it came from. Her daughter gave me a blank look and said it came from Safeway. We explained that I meant I wanted a personal relationship with the cow.

Since this thread is about meat in general, I'll mention a pet peeve, which is people who overcook liver. Liver is a delicate meat that needs to be cooked like fish. When the color changes, it's done. It should be so tender you can cut it with a fork. It's also full of blood, and can benefit greatly by marinading in cheap red wine to remove the blood.
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Old 06-24-2014, 12:43 PM
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,393 posts, read 9,423,783 times
Reputation: 4575
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
I had a girlfriend once who offered to fix steak tartare. I told her before I ate any raw meat I wanted to know where it came from. Her daughter gave me a blank look and said it came from Safeway. We explained that I meant I wanted a personal relationship with the cow.

Since this thread is about meat in general, I'll mention a pet peeve, which is people who overcook liver. Liver is a delicate meat that needs to be cooked like fish. When the color changes, it's done. It should be so tender you can cut it with a fork. It's also full of blood, and can benefit greatly by marinading in cheap red wine to remove the blood.
I'd be too scared to make my own steak tartare at home. I love the stuff, and I know it's reasonably safe when all proper precautions are taken. I'd just worry that I'd mess it up somehow.
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Old 06-24-2014, 01:01 PM
 
Location: South Central Texas
114,037 posts, read 52,372,395 times
Reputation: 161826
Quote:
Originally Posted by jay5835 View Post
Well, it was Longhorn.
Yes, it was. They're not exactly the bottom of the chains list though.
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Old 06-24-2014, 01:20 PM
 
Location: South Central Texas
114,037 posts, read 52,372,395 times
Reputation: 161826
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToddATX View Post
As I have been saying, it is commonly known practice. It's not just BK and me saying it - it has even been written about. Anthony Bourdain's first book, Kitchen Confidential, also talked about it. Why do you think that book blew up, and made him such a star? Because those of us either currently or formerly in the industry loved it and ate it up, because it hits so close to home.

And again, as for the part of your post that I boldened - if you eat out at non mass-chain restaraunts and order well done, this has been done repeatedly to you over the years so apparently you can't tell the difference. Also, I will repeat what I said earlier - what we refer to as these poor/misplaced cuts, are still likely superior to anything that you buy at home. These are generally US Prime or similar very high grade steaks, often dry aged. Yes they are poorer end cuts/pieces that are less than ideal, but when a good chef finishes with it, it will still be better than what you do at home and obviously you don't notice it.

SO ... you get your overcooked leather the way you want it, we get rid of cuts we wouldn't otherwise sell, and thus keep down our food cost percenteges, and everyone is happy ... enjoy.
You don't need to tell me anything about Anthony Bourdain. I enjoyed many episodes of his comical although pompous behavior. There's not enough chefs, ex or otherwise, around to make his book a best seller. Many enjoy his escapades. Your line quoted here...

Quote:
if you eat out at non mass-chain restaraunts and order well done, this has been done repeatedly to you over the years so apparently you can't tell the difference. Also, I will repeat what I said earlier - what we refer to as these poor/misplaced cuts, are still likely superior to anything that you buy at home. These are generally US Prime or similar very high grade steaks, often dry aged. Yes they are poorer end cuts/pieces that are less than ideal, but when a good chef finishes with it, it will still be better than what you do at home and obviously you don't notice it.
First of all ...no, I can cook steaks just as well or better at home generally speaking. Secondly, you know nothing about me or my preferences so all your bunk is aimed at all who like their meat cooked more than medium. Thirdly, you are telling me that all the small independent steak houses adhere to a common practice more than chains do. One more...I generally wouldn't bring this to light but it seems as though chefs are unable to spell the business in which they've toiled for years screwing up peoples steaks.

I'm just not buying what you're selling.
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Old 06-24-2014, 01:22 PM
 
Location: North Oakland
8,835 posts, read 8,173,387 times
Reputation: 13337
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavenWood View Post
I'd be too scared to make my own steak tartare at home. I love the stuff, and I know it's reasonably safe when all proper precautions are taken. I'd just worry that I'd mess it up somehow.
It's a good idea to cut your own tenderloin. See this recipe from CHOW: http://www.chow.com/recipes/10983-classic-steak-tartare

I would leave out the onion, but that's just me.
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Old 06-24-2014, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Long Neck,De
4,793 posts, read 6,506,601 times
Reputation: 4742
Medium A little pink BUT no blood
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Old 06-24-2014, 01:59 PM
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,393 posts, read 9,423,783 times
Reputation: 4575
Quote:
Originally Posted by jay5835 View Post
It's a good idea to cut your own tenderloin. See this recipe from CHOW: Classic Steak Tartare Recipe - CHOW

I would leave out the onion, but that's just me.
That looks like an outstanding recipe. One of these days, maybe I'll work up the nerve.

Quote:
Originally Posted by longnecker View Post
Medium A little pink BUT no blood
Stop calling it blood, people!
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