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Old 06-24-2014, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Austin
668 posts, read 460,120 times
Reputation: 887

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Den0190 View Post
Medium.

Rare is too bloody and will make me sick looking at all the blood dripping out of it.

Well-done is too tough and it cooks the flavor out of it.
If Medium is how you like it great, but just one thing ... Rare is not bloody/runny. If you cook a steak to any temperature and let it rest properly before cutting in at all, then it should not run. I like my steaks between blue and med-rare, and there is never run off, just make sure and rest it. Also, it's not blood that you see ... but just making the point. Medium steaks will also run if cut too early. You have to let the steaks rest after cooking.
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Old 06-24-2014, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Austin
668 posts, read 460,120 times
Reputation: 887
Quote:
Originally Posted by SATX56 View Post
Thirdly, you are telling me that all the small independent steak houses adhere to a common practice more than chains do.
It's not "common practices" as far as recipes or anything, it is a matter of minimizing food costs. Restaurant fail all over the place. They run on the tiniest of margins. And especially your finer dinning places, are using far more expensive ingredients and thus running much lower margins often.

You don't think it ... here is Kitchen Confidential, copyright 2000, from page 69, the chapter "From Our Kitchen to Your Table":

"Saving for well-done" is a time-honored tradition dating back to cuisine's earliest days: meat and fish cost money. Every piece of cut, fabricated food must, ideally, be sold for three or even four times its cost in order for the chef to make his "food cost percent". So what happens when the chef finds a tough, slightly skanky end-cut of sirloin that's been pushed repeatedly to the back of the pile? He can throw it out, but that's a total loss, representing a three-fold loss of what it cost him per pound. He can feed it to the family, which is the same as thrwing it out. Or he can "save for well-done" - serve it to some rube who prefers to eat his meat or fish incinerated into a flavorless, leathery hunk of carbon, who won't be able to tell if what he's eating is food or flotsam. Ordinarily a proud chef would hate this customer, hold him in contempt for destroying his fine food. But not in this case. The dumb bastard is paying for the privilege of eating his garbage! What's not to like? (italics added by Bourdain, not me)

It is a well known practice. Do 100% of restaurants do this? No. Is it a very common practice that is done at probably most/a very high percentage of quality restaurants? Yes. And again, it's not maliscious. We probably don't have a very high opinion of your palate, but that doesn't mean you are a terrible person, or deserve poor service, and you obviously have never noticed so who gets hurt?

Quote:
One more...I generally wouldn't bring this to light but it seems as though chefs are unable to spell the business in which they've toiled for years screwing up peoples steaks.

I'm just not buying what you're selling.
I'm dyslexic, AND often typing while on long drives ... *********, spelling doesn't mean I don't know what I'm talking about.
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Old 06-24-2014, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Local Group, Virgo SC
66 posts, read 53,234 times
Reputation: 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavenWood View Post
Stop calling it blood, people!
That's starting to irritate me too. If your steak has blood, then the cow wasn't properly slaughtered and butchered :P
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Old 06-24-2014, 03:14 PM
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,393 posts, read 9,423,783 times
Reputation: 4575
Quote:
Originally Posted by Altair75 View Post
That's starting to irritate me too. If your steak has blood, then the cow wasn't properly slaughtered and butchered :P
I would be more forgiving if that red juice tasted anything like actual blood.
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Old 06-24-2014, 03:25 PM
 
Location: South Central Texas
114,037 posts, read 52,372,395 times
Reputation: 161826
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToddATX View Post
It's not "common practices" as far as recipes or anything, it is a matter of minimizing food costs. Restaurant fail all over the place. They run on the tiniest of margins. And especially your finer dinning places, are using far more expensive ingredients and thus running much lower margins often.

You don't think it ... here is Kitchen Confidential, copyright 2000, from page 69, the chapter "From Our Kitchen to Your Table":

"Saving for well-done" is a time-honored tradition dating back to cuisine's earliest days: meat and fish cost money. Every piece of cut, fabricated food must, ideally, be sold for three or even four times its cost in order for the chef to make his "food cost percent". So what happens when the chef finds a tough, slightly skanky end-cut of sirloin that's been pushed repeatedly to the back of the pile? He can throw it out, but that's a total loss, representing a three-fold loss of what it cost him per pound. He can feed it to the family, which is the same as thrwing it out. Or he can "save for well-done" - serve it to some rube who prefers to eat his meat or fish incinerated into a flavorless, leathery hunk of carbon, who won't be able to tell if what he's eating is food or flotsam. Ordinarily a proud chef would hate this customer, hold him in contempt for destroying his fine food. But not in this case. The dumb bastard is paying for the privilege of eating his garbage! What's not to like? (italics added by Bourdain, not me)

It is a well known practice. Do 100% of restaurants do this? No. Is it a very common practice that is done at probably most/a very high percentage of quality restaurants? Yes. And again, it's not maliscious. We probably don't have a very high opinion of your palate, but that doesn't mean you are a terrible person, or deserve poor service, and you obviously have never noticed so who gets hurt?



I'm dyslexic, AND often typing while on long drives ... *********, spelling doesn't mean I don't know what I'm talking about.
That was likely where you first heard of it. Remember we're not talking about my choices or palate as you know nothing of my preferences. Of course Bourdain's obnoxious/silly wit (depending on one's view) is what got him his own show.

So you adhere to the notion (or Bourdain's way of thinking) that anyone who requests a steak cooked more than medium rare is a dumb bastard? That anyone who may like their asparagus cooked to a different stage than you is a dumb bastard. Both should be used to "dump" the establishments lesser quality items off on. Then you expect us to pay your servers wages above and beyond the cost of your fine food? I'm not concerned with a restaurants tiny margins. Some make it, some don't, it all comes out in the wash with the poor product served or poor service. You're wasting your breath on me. I see where you've come from and I don't like what i see.
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Old 06-24-2014, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Austin
668 posts, read 460,120 times
Reputation: 887
Quote:
Originally Posted by SATX56 View Post
That was likely where you first heard of it.
No, I worked in kitchens for years I saw it happen.

Quote:
So you adhere to the notion (or Bourdain's way of thinking) that anyone who requests a steak cooked more than medium rare is a dumb bastard?
No, Bourdain while I enjoy him alot, is a blowhard who is going to say over the top things like that. Do I think that someone who likes their steak well done has a bad palate? Absolutely. It is my believe that blue - medium is a matter of taste, but beyond that a steak is ruined, and especially so in the case of well done.

However, it doesn't mean you are a jerk, that you should get bad service, that I dislike you personally, that I think you have no mental faculties or anything else. It doesn't mean that anything unsanitary should or would happen to your food, it doesn't mean that there shouldn't be care in your treatment, it doesn't. The only thing that it means is that A. (and this is the biggest point) a steak cooked to death like that will hide the imperfections that we can't sell for a properly cooked steak, and B. (to a lesser extent) the pallate of that person isn't likely to notice any other imperfections either.

Quote:
Some make it, some don't, it all comes out in the wash with the poor product served or poor service. You're wasting your breath on me. I see where you've come from and I don't like what i see.
Again, poor service doens't come into this. We don't give poor service. We don't sell poor prodcut. I have made that clear. The quality of steaks these places buy and prepare are boyond what you buy 99.9% of the time. It's not that you are being served a steak that should be thrown out of Wal-Mart because the people there couldn't even sell it. It is a steak that isn't up to the snuff of your normally high quality. It is still a very good product ... when we describe it as skanky end cut we are not describing it as trash, we are describing it in comparison to the perfection that is the goal we strive for in sending out our high end product.

But, they do have imperfections and yes we serve them to our well-done's.
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Old 06-24-2014, 04:02 PM
 
Location: South Central Texas
114,037 posts, read 52,372,395 times
Reputation: 161826
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToddATX View Post
No, I worked in kitchens for years I saw it happen.



No, Bourdain while I enjoy him alot, is a blowhard who is going to say over the top things like that. Do I think that someone who likes their steak well done has a bad palate? Absolutely. It is my believe that blue - medium is a matter of taste, but beyond that a steak is ruined, and especially so in the case of well done.

However, it doesn't mean you are a jerk, that you should get bad service, that I dislike you personally, that I think you have no mental faculties or anything else. It doesn't mean that anything unsanitary should or would happen to your food, it doesn't mean that there shouldn't be care in your treatment, it doesn't. The only thing that it means is that A. (and this is the biggest point) a steak cooked to death like that will hide the imperfections that we can't sell for a properly cooked steak, and B. (to a lesser extent) the pallate of that person isn't likely to notice any other imperfections either.



Again, poor service doens't come into this. We don't give poor service. We don't sell poor prodcut. I have made that clear. The quality of steaks these places buy and prepare are boyond what you buy 99.9% of the time. It's not that you are being served a steak that should be thrown out of Wal-Mart because the people there couldn't even sell it. It is a steak that isn't up to the snuff of your normally high quality. It is still a very good product ... when we describe it as skanky end cut we are not describing it as trash, we are describing it in comparison to the perfection that is the goal we strive for in sending out our high end product.

But, they do have imperfections and yes we serve them to our well-done's.
Gotcha! Thanks for the clarification. .......
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Old 06-24-2014, 04:28 PM
 
6,319 posts, read 5,366,795 times
Reputation: 11918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburban_Guy View Post
How do you guys like your meats cooked, especially steak?

I still prefer my meat to not have any bloodiness to it.

There was a thought that some people change their preferences for how they like their steak cooked, well done as a young kid, and then rare as they got older.

Me, been consistent from young age to now, I just can't stomach bloody meat. Granted well done can make meat too tough, so I like medium well, a nice balance between no blood and still tasty.
Most chefs I know flatly refuse to cook a steak anything more than medium rare.

To cook it more is to ruin it.

There is a HUGE difference between well done and "bloody", well done is ruined, bleu is still twitching, rare is bloody, med rare is PINK JUICE which is what you're aiming for.

Yummmm.
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Old 06-24-2014, 05:57 PM
 
17,159 posts, read 22,175,230 times
Reputation: 31232
Quote:
Originally Posted by cindersslipper View Post
Most chefs I know flatly refuse to cook a steak anything more than medium rare.

To cook it more is to ruin it.

There is a HUGE difference between well done and "bloody", well done is ruined, bleu is still twitching, rare is bloody, med rare is PINK JUICE which is what you're aiming for.

Yummmm.
I agree

pink & juicy yummmmmmm
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Old 06-24-2014, 06:50 PM
 
Location: CO
2,456 posts, read 2,439,044 times
Reputation: 5155
I've always liked steaks cooked medium-rare and have ordered them that way for many years. But, it's an odd thing I've noticed in the past couple of years - a steak ordered medium-rare more often than not makes its way to the table as rare. Same with burgers. Maybe it's a local thing but I've changed my order to medium in order to get medium-rare. Works every time and I don't know what's up with that.
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