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Old 12-29-2014, 02:49 PM
 
1,789 posts, read 1,346,756 times
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modern soaps will not remove the seasoning, so its perfectly safe to clean with a little soap and light brushing. Using metal utensils on a well seasoned pan shouldn't be a problem either so long as you don't go to digging on the pan with the metal. Its a lot tougher than non-stick.

I usually brush it out with a spatula or whatever cooking utensil i am using to remove any large chunks then get the pan hot and toss some water in to deglaze it, and brush it out with a soft bristle brush while its still hot. Rinse it out and place it back on the burner and heat it for just a min or so to dry it out. Then store it.

To completely clean a pan and start over you need to use some chemicals, because its not that easy to remove the seasoning once it gets messed up. I have used lye before and it works. Here is a link from an expert on with several ways on how to strip and restore a pan.

How to Restore Vintage Cast Iron Pans | Serious Eats

Unsaturated fats like veg oil, canola oil, flax oil etc work better than saturated fats like animal oils to season a pan.
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Old 12-29-2014, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Wilton, CT
44 posts, read 32,323 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justanokie View Post
To completely clean a pan and start over you need to use some chemicals, because its not that easy to remove the seasoning once it gets messed up. I have used lye before and it works. Here is a link from an expert on with several ways on how to strip and restore a pan.

How to Restore Vintage Cast Iron Pans | Serious Eats

Unsaturated fats like veg oil, canola oil, flax oil etc work better than saturated fats like animal oils to season a pan.
I've read about using lye before, or oven cleaner. BUT... those things are toxic!! Cast iron is porous! That's just not healthy! Heating (not the clean cycle) and oiling is the best.
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Old 12-29-2014, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,135,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shyguylh View Post
...I scrambled eggs this morning...I was nervous about "pounding" on the eggs in the pan...
How in the heck do you cook scrambled eggs? The word "pounding" never comes to mind when I cook scrambled eggs.

Cooking eggs on a perfectly seasoned cast iron skillet is one of the true joys of cooking.
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Old 12-29-2014, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,135,059 times
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BTW - has anyone compared the finish on a "vintage" cast iron pan to the new ones?
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Old 12-29-2014, 05:21 PM
 
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i know people that never clean the skillet , i alway just rinse quickly and put back on heat to dry. (I know it could warp them) I keep mine in the oven, so if i bake they get heated again.
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Old 12-29-2014, 05:25 PM
 
1,789 posts, read 1,346,756 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JanetMlr View Post
I've read about using lye before, or oven cleaner. BUT... those things are toxic!! Cast iron is porous! That's just not healthy! Heating (not the clean cycle) and oiling is the best.
For sure its not something you want to be doing all the time or for regular cleanings. If the seasoning is damaged, its the best way to go about it.
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Old 12-29-2014, 05:41 PM
 
23,909 posts, read 31,137,585 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Threerun View Post
That's it. No soap EVER. Either scrape and oil, salt rub and oil or boil, scrub and oil. Been doing it that way as long as I can remember, and that's what my family did before me. Those skillets are still going strong!

Enjoy!
Nah. I use mild dish soap all the time in mine, especially if it is very greasy. I don't scrub it, I use a flexible scraper to get stuck bits off. Never ever hurts it.



Myth #4: "You should NEVER wash your cast iron pan with soap."

The Theory: Seasoning is a thin layer of oil that coats the inside of your skillet. Soap is designed to remove oil, therefore soap will damage your seasoning.

The Reality: Seasoning is actually not a thin layer of oil, it's a thin layer of polymerized oil, a key distinction. In a properly seasoned cast iron pan, one that has been rubbed with oil and heated repeatedly, the oil has already broken down into a plastic-like substance that has bonded to the surface of the metal. This is what gives well-seasoned cast iron its non-stick properties, and as the material is no longer actually an oil, the surfactants in dish soap should not affect it. Go ahead and soap it up and scrub it out.

The one thing you shouldn't do? Let it soak in the sink. Try to minimize the time it takes from when you start cleaning to when you dry and re-season your pan. If that means letting it sit on the stovetop until dinner is done, so be it.


The Truth About Cast Iron Pans: 7 Myths That Need To Go Away | Serious Eats
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Old 12-29-2014, 05:43 PM
 
251 posts, read 147,088 times
Reputation: 633
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanokie View Post
modern soaps will not remove the seasoning, so its perfectly safe to clean with a little soap and light brushing. Using metal utensils on a well seasoned pan shouldn't be a problem either so long as you don't go to digging on the pan with the metal. Its a lot tougher than non-stick.

I usually brush it out with a spatula or whatever cooking utensil i am using to remove any large chunks then get the pan hot and toss some water in to deglaze it, and brush it out with a soft bristle brush while its still hot. Rinse it out and place it back on the burner and heat it for just a min or so to dry it out. Then store it.

To completely clean a pan and start over you need to use some chemicals, because its not that easy to remove the seasoning once it gets messed up. I have used lye before and it works. Here is a link from an expert on with several ways on how to strip and restore a pan.

How to Restore Vintage Cast Iron Pans | Serious Eats

Unsaturated fats like veg oil, canola oil, flax oil etc work better than saturated fats like animal oils to season a pan.

I beg to differ; my pans (handed down from my Grandmother), are always re-seasoned with bacon grease whenever needed and they are in perfect condition.

Out on the prairie, 150 years ago, our ancestors did not have the luxury of popping into the deli for EEVO...they used what was at hand...bacon grease.

I sure wouldn't be storing mine in that plastic either.
.
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Old 12-29-2014, 07:08 PM
 
3 posts, read 2,201 times
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I wash mine with salt liberally and scrub with a washcloth and warm water...never fails
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Old 12-29-2014, 07:12 PM
Status: "Gone hunting until December!" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
10,948 posts, read 14,593,711 times
Reputation: 11405
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
Nah. I use mild dish soap all the time in mine, especially if it is very greasy. I don't scrub it, I use a flexible scraper to get stuck bits off. Never ever hurts it.



Myth #4: "You should NEVER wash your cast iron pan with soap."

The Theory: Seasoning is a thin layer of oil that coats the inside of your skillet. Soap is designed to remove oil, therefore soap will damage your seasoning.

The Reality: Seasoning is actually not a thin layer of oil, it's a thin layer of polymerized oil, a key distinction. In a properly seasoned cast iron pan, one that has been rubbed with oil and heated repeatedly, the oil has already broken down into a plastic-like substance that has bonded to the surface of the metal. This is what gives well-seasoned cast iron its non-stick properties, and as the material is no longer actually an oil, the surfactants in dish soap should not affect it. Go ahead and soap it up and scrub it out.

The one thing you shouldn't do? Let it soak in the sink. Try to minimize the time it takes from when you start cleaning to when you dry and re-season your pan. If that means letting it sit on the stovetop until dinner is done, so be it.


The Truth About Cast Iron Pans: 7 Myths That Need To Go Away | Serious Eats
Soap has never touched mine and I intend to keep it that way- period. Myth or no myth you have a choice. My choice is to pre-heat my pans prior to cooking, and not have any soap residue in my food. Mine has a nice layer of patina carbon- burned oils are that, ya know? It's a nice, smooth sheen that shall not ever absorb any odor other than what was cooked into it. No lye, no soap, no detergents. Just heat and oil.

Last edited by Threerun; 12-29-2014 at 07:25 PM..
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