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Old 04-21-2015, 01:45 PM
 
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proper seasoning creates a non-stick surface that also prevents rusting. rub a bit of oil on the bottom after using as constant flame on bottom will burn away seasoning. rust can start there..
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Old 04-21-2015, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
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Originally Posted by puginabug View Post
The Truth About Cast Iron Pans: 7 Myths That Need To Go Away | Serious Eats

This is a really informative article about cast iron by J. Kenji Lopez-Alt from The Food Lab.

I don't use mine nearly enough, but love steaks cooked in it. I will often clean it by scraping whatver fat/gunk is in it following cooking, then scrub it with kosher salt and some olive oil, and a paper towel.
Thanks for the link. Now I know how to smooth up our new Lodge wok like the ancient cast iron pieces we have. Sometime back I was gifted with two classic cast iron items. One deep fryer with lid and a dutch oven with lid. One is coated in olive oil and that has to go. Most likely I'll have it sand blasted before it gets a proper seasoning. New to our cast iron collection is a stone finished dutch oven for slow cooking chilli or oven baking sourdough breads.
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Old 04-21-2015, 02:43 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Pig Smoker View Post
Thanks for the link. Now I know how to smooth up our new Lodge wok like the ancient cast iron pieces we have. Sometime back I was gifted with two classic cast iron items. One deep fryer with lid and a dutch oven with lid. One is coated in olive oil and that has to go. Most likely I'll have it sand blasted before it gets a proper seasoning. New to our cast iron collection is a stone finished dutch oven for slow cooking chilli or oven baking sourdough breads.
LOL, no need for a sandblasting. If your oven has a self clean feature, use it to clean the pan of old seasoning. You can also throw it in the BBQ on high or even put it in a campfire. Some sandpaper and elbow grease work too.
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Old 04-21-2015, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
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Originally Posted by st33lcas3 View Post
LOL, no need for a sandblasting. If your oven has a self clean feature, use it to clean the pan of old seasoning. You can also throw it in the BBQ on high or even put it in a campfire. Some sandpaper and elbow grease work too.
I've already considered putting it in the gas grill. With my elbows my sandblasting friend might be a wise decision after a heat treatment.
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Old 04-21-2015, 02:51 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Pig Smoker View Post
Thanks for the link. Now I know how to smooth up our new Lodge wok like the ancient cast iron pieces we have. Sometime back I was gifted with two classic cast iron items. One deep fryer with lid and a dutch oven with lid. One is coated in olive oil and that has to go. Most likely I'll have it sand blasted before it gets a proper seasoning. New to our cast iron collection is a stone finished dutch oven for slow cooking chilli or oven baking sourdough breads.

WHITE VINEGAR is your friend
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Old 04-21-2015, 02:52 PM
 
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Originally Posted by st33lcas3 View Post
LOL, no need for a sandblasting. If your oven has a self clean feature, use it to clean the pan of old seasoning. You can also throw it in the BBQ on high or even put it in a campfire. Some sandpaper and elbow grease work too.

You melt that skillet away in a campfire or on a hot BBQ grill.
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Old 04-21-2015, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
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Originally Posted by Versatile View Post
WHITE VINEGAR is your friend
Thanks, I'll start with the gallon of white vinegar I have. That's probably better than taking it to the ocean surf and letting rolling waves of saltwater and sand polish them.
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Old 04-21-2015, 03:08 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Versatile View Post
You melt that skillet away in a campfire or on a hot BBQ grill.
No you won't. I've put pans and camp style dutch ovens in fires to clean them. It works great. Of course you don't want to leave them overnight, but an hour or two won't hurt. How to do think the pans are formed?
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Old 04-21-2015, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Chicago - Logan Square
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Originally Posted by Versatile View Post
You melt that skillet away in a campfire or on a hot BBQ grill.
Nope - won't happen. I spent almost an entire night trying to melt a cast iron skillet in a campfire when I was in Boy Scouts. Got it glowing orange, but it didn't melt. I still use it today as a matter of fact (30 years later).

You need to get well over 2,000 degrees to melt iron, and campfires or grills won't get anywhere near those temps (otherwise the BBQ grill itself would melt).
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Old 04-21-2015, 03:47 PM
 
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Originally Posted by aneye4detail View Post
I just bought my first ever, and I'm trying to read up on the care and seasoning of them.

I want to do it with coconut oil if it's ok. I found some info and it says "spread the oil on the inside and outside of the skillet." Why the outside??? It says to bake it, but other places say just do it on the stove.

Then there's the possibility of putting too much oil and making it sticky, or that the seasoning that came with the pan will scrape off somehow if you do something wrong.

Ugh, is all this fuss worth it? I'm thinking you'll probably say yes.

Let's put it this way - I am always looking for an easy way to do things, if it's too hard, fughetaboutit! So what should I do with my new pan? Or should I even keep it? I've gone 47 years living without one, maybe I don't need one?
You're thinking too much.

Just start cooking stuff in bacon grease (I like fried bread myself) and don't use detergent to clean it. Just scrape it dry with a paper towel, or a no-soap stainless scrubbing pad and water if you've got a bad mess.
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