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Old 04-21-2015, 05:32 PM
 
2,920 posts, read 2,911,732 times
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I don't let water touch my skillet unless it's for cooking. I use kosher salt and a little oil, heat it up, and scrub it with folded paper towels. I avoid acidic food like tomatoes, so I can't imagine why anyone would use vinegar. That along with soap will dissolve the coating that you're trying to make. I do put a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar in my turnip greens, but it caramelizes. The skillet will rust and flake on the bottom if you don't keep that seasoned too.

I have several skillets. My favorite is a round flat griddle that was found in a warehouse. I'll bet it's thirty years old.
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Old 04-21-2015, 06:21 PM
 
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OK I think my new pan is seasoned, so I made eggs in it, and came out pretty good. Nothing stuck. So now, I guess I will wipe it with a paper towel, and then re-oil it and leave it on the stove for the next time? So excited!
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Old 04-21-2015, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
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A well seasoned pork steak in a well seasoned antique cast iron frying pan:

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Old 04-22-2015, 02:06 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Subzro View Post
Cast iron skillets have been ubiquitous cooking vessels for several centuries, making them the polar opposite of trendy.
Uhhh...yeah...you missed the point totally. They ARE currently trendy, especially the "Lodge" brand, just like Caphalon was in the 90's. Ever heard of *everything old is new again??*
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Old 04-22-2015, 05:39 AM
 
Location: Port Charlotte FL
910 posts, read 522,357 times
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Barlean's flax oil..accept no substitutes..wipe it in..put it in the oven at 350 for one hour..let completely cool..repeat, several times..done..

Amazon.com: Barlean's Organic Oils Lignan Flax Oil, 32-Ounce Bottle: Health & Personal Care
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Old 04-22-2015, 05:53 AM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
8,305 posts, read 11,824,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aneye4detail View Post
I just bought my first ever, and I'm trying to read up on the care and seasoning of them.

I want to do it with coconut oil if it's ok. I found some info and it says "spread the oil on the inside and outside of the skillet." Why the outside??? It says to bake it, but other places say just do it on the stove.

Then there's the possibility of putting too much oil and making it sticky, or that the seasoning that came with the pan will scrape off somehow if you do something wrong.

Ugh, is all this fuss worth it? I'm thinking you'll probably say yes.

Let's put it this way - I am always looking for an easy way to do things, if it's too hard, fughetaboutit! So what should I do with my new pan? Or should I even keep it? I've gone 47 years living without one, maybe I don't need one?
I don't think it's worth the trouble now, but there was a time when I would enjoy it as a hobby.

If it's pre-seasoned you won't need to season it unless food starts getting sticky. Just use hot water and a paper towel to clean it - but it won't hurt to briefly use detergent if it's really bad. The coating from long use is very strong, like enamel, so it won't come off that easily ..... but of course it shouldn't get bad enough to need detergent.

I like to use a fat with a high smoking temp to season in order to avoid smoke ...... I think I may have ended up using ordinary cheap "vegetable" mixed oil, the refined common type, baking it at 350f for an hour or so. Other good choices are corn, avocado, peanut, or soy. Unlike use for health purposes, you want the most refined unhealthy version since it has a higher smoke point.

I say why bother. A good nonstick pan is better and much lighter. I suggest using it very occasionally without seasoning if it says pre-seasoned, let it hang up on the wall and only use it to impress guests.
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Old 04-22-2015, 10:12 AM
 
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OK, I cooked bacon in it last night and it started smoking. Did I have the heat up too high? Too long?
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Old 04-22-2015, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
184,077 posts, read 75,040,883 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aneye4detail View Post
OK, I cooked bacon in it last night and it started smoking. Did I have the heat up too high? Too long?
Sounds to me like the heat was to high. There is what is called the "Flash Point" for all oils and that is where you never want to be with the oil temp. Try just cooking at a lower temp "Medium Low" and just turn and watch the bacon get done. At the first sign of smoke get it off the burner. Lower the burner more and then finish is my suggestion.
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Old 04-22-2015, 06:15 PM
 
7,131 posts, read 2,902,119 times
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Too much work for me. I use nonstick and it works wonderfully !
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Old 04-22-2015, 11:52 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
10,968 posts, read 14,622,521 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tominftl View Post
Too much work for me. I use nonstick and it works wonderfully !
My irons are non-stick and no work.

To the OP- there are 100's of varying opinions and a lot of ways to do it 'right'. Just let common sense be your guide. Don't make it harder than it looks. It's cast iron. It likes oil, hates water and conducts heat marvelously. You cook any food in iron hotter than it likes it will smoke. Same for stainless steel, aluminum, whatever. That's all a learning curve on cooking.

That's all you need to know. Seriously.

Just oil it, cook in it, clean it and be done. The rest comes with time.
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