U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 05-16-2015, 04:14 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,530 posts, read 42,694,765 times
Reputation: 57174

Advertisements

... Do you ever feel cheated when you leave an expensive restaurant?

The Chef's Table is a series about 6 of the world's top chefs (none of which you ever heard of on Food Network). I enjoyed it very much, because it exposes the truly gifted chefs as artists and intellectuals, no less talented than the Picassos or the DaVincis of our time, and it is very focused on the use of fresh local ingredients, which I love.

In every single one of the six profiles, they showed a variety of platings from each chef's restaurant. With the exception of the Spanish guy, who liked to cook a bunch of things he killed, on a fire in the wilderness, they only served a teeny little piece of food on an artfully arranged plate.

My feeling is this is a case of "the Emperor has no clothes". If I am going to a gourmet (expensive) restaurant, and I am paying a lot of money, I will not be happy if I am given 1 scallop with a leaf next to it, a single slice of Kobe beef with a swirl of green stuff, or a single prawn, etc.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-16-2015, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles>Little Rock>Houston>Little Rock
6,488 posts, read 6,596,921 times
Reputation: 17327
Yes. There was a restaurant here in town we loved going to. The food was delicious and the atmosphere was friendly and welcoming. Then they changed chefs. I ordered Angel Hair Shrimp and got a tiny bit of pasta with two shrimps on it. The rest of the huge plate was swirled with a pink sauce the color of Pepto Bismol. It was inedible. Yuck!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2015, 04:28 PM
 
Location: League City, Texas
2,812 posts, read 4,310,305 times
Reputation: 5796
I haven't watched the series yet (it's in my queue).

In my experience, most fine dining experiences include multiple courses--that "one scallop with a leaf" might just be the fish course or amuse bouche.

Dinner at Alinea included 24 courses, each just a couple of bites. Trust me--24 one or two bite courses, over 4-6 hours, definitely leaves you full!

I understand your view, but I don't think most people go to a high end restaurant looking to get huge portions. Sometimes quality trumps quantity.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2015, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
22,694 posts, read 21,741,083 times
Reputation: 27747
It happened to me once. Not only was the food not exceptional, I left hungry. I don't have a big appetite, so that's pretty hard to do.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2015, 06:11 PM
 
3,876 posts, read 4,571,964 times
Reputation: 10004
I agree with hellpaso -- dinners at those restaurants are multi-multi course productions and each bite is intensely flavorful as well as gorgeous to look at.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2015, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Currently living in Reddit
5,655 posts, read 5,461,804 times
Reputation: 7254
Quote:
Originally Posted by weezycom View Post
I agree with hellpaso -- dinners at those restaurants are multi-multi course productions and each bite is intensely flavorful as well as gorgeous to look at.
Yeah. Not something even hardcore foodies would do often (certainly not inexpensive!!!), but with the right kitchen, it can be an incredible dining experience (although other diners taking photos of every single one of those 24 courses gets annoying!).
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2015, 06:03 AM
 
17,158 posts, read 22,161,261 times
Reputation: 31223
I like the flavors of the food itself...

restraint of over-seasoning and allowing the original flavor to be the centerpiece of the palate is my pet peeve amongst higher end restaurants..

take a lamb chop...I order lamb chops because I love lamb,,,i don't want this in a rich marinade/seasoning where im paying big bucks for cheap seasonings - seasonings I don't even like

pasta,, yes,,it needs seasonings,,,but ive pretty much stopped going to high end places for meals.....not just because of small servings but ,,, because in an effort to enhance/brand their own flavors,,,it destroys the original flavors(s)
for a huge price tag?? no thanks

and my god,,,stop with the damn menus looking like latin,,,, if something is a duck,,,call it a damn duck,,,

if something is a boneless chicken breast,,,call it something close to it,,,
I read a whole paragraph for a breaded chicken breast fillet.... of all the supposed goodies in it- of course they didn't call it a breaded chicken breast...
and again,,it was overseasoned


ive seen many of these cooking competitions,,,you have to feel for the contestants/chefs because the judges talk out of both sides of their mouths

they will say ( you need to "get out of your flavor box" try something different ,,,etc..)
then when they do,,,they will get slammed for "this isn't what we expected from you" why would you try this"???
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2015, 06:23 AM
 
2,442 posts, read 1,795,692 times
Reputation: 4644
Quote:
Originally Posted by hellpaso View Post
I haven't watched the series yet (it's in my queue).

In my experience, most fine dining experiences include multiple courses--that "one scallop with a leaf" might just be the fish course or amuse bouche.

Dinner at Alinea included 24 courses, each just a couple of bites. Trust me--24 one or two bite courses, over 4-6 hours, definitely leaves you full!

I understand your view, but I don't think most people go to a high end restaurant looking to get huge portions. Sometimes quality trumps quantity.
In my experience the degustation menu has those tiny servings, a la carte dishes are a more normal size, the entree is very small, the main is a reasonable size for a person, and desserts are a little too large. You should not be served so much food that you need a doggy bag.

A degustation menu is where you put yourself in the chef's hands and they bring you a stream of food and accompanying wine. If they were larger serves you'd have to have a cleansing vomit halfway through.


Quote:
Originally Posted by mainebrokerman View Post
I like the flavors of the food itself.

Restraint of over-seasoning and allowing the original flavor to be the centerpiece of the palate is my pet peeve amongst higher end restaurants.


Sorry, I couldn't bring myself to quote all of those commas without fixing them, but it was too much work.

If you want a plain lamb chop, cook it at home for a quarter the price. In a restaurant you're paying for the skill of the chef in seasoning and saucing.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2015, 07:25 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
2,599 posts, read 1,487,276 times
Reputation: 7651
Yes, I went with three friends to a highly rated restaurant in Minneapolis a few years back. As I recall, I paid a bundle (more than I could afford at the time, but everyone else really wanted to try this place) for a tiny portion of seafood and some sous-vide veggies.

The atmosphere was not comfortable (the chairs were these Industrial Chic steel frames with no padding that looked like they should be on someone's lawn), the other clientele looked uncomfortable, as if they didn't know how they were supposed to act in such a fancy place, the waiter was arrogant, the food took forever to arrive, and when it did, I was shocked to see a plate with more plate visible than food.

There was a tiny piece of fish, one (ONE!) shrimp and one (ONE!) scallop. The miniscule portion of vegetables was undercooked (how do you do that with a sous-vide?). The scallop was delicious--as I told my husband later, I could have eaten two of them. Oh, and before our meal, we were given a complimentary ironic cocktail featuring Pop Rocks.

I still squirm to think how much that tiny meal cost. It would have been different if I had enjoyed much of it.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2015, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,334,463 times
Reputation: 48613
I have yet to eat anywhere where the quality was so amazing that I would have been glad to be served a fraction of a portion (for an amuse-bouche, sure...not for the meal). At the best restaurants I've eaten at, I would still hope to be served an actual portion size, not a tapas-sized small bite. I know there are chefs who characterize their food as their artwork. It's still a meal. Sustenance should factor in. Who wants to leave hungry (and that much lighter in the wallet, to boot)?
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top