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Old 01-23-2008, 11:36 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
10,716 posts, read 31,026,539 times
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I want to try making this at home. My daughter and I have had this out at a restuarant and it was wonderful.

I am seeing that alot of the recipes use white wine. I don't know anything about buying wine and I would like to find a way to make it without this. I doubt very seriously my daughter would like the taste of it and probably shouldn't have it anyway.

Does anyone have any suggestions?

Like chicken stock perhaps?

I suppose I could use white grape juice but that sounds strange.
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Old 01-24-2008, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Denver
2,970 posts, read 6,149,944 times
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The wine really adds to the flavor....I don't think I have ever had a fondue without some kind of alcohol in it....the heat burns off the alcohol and the flavor becomes concentrated. If you had it in a restaurant and liked it, I say give one of the recipes you've found a try, wine and all....
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Old 01-24-2008, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Oz
2,238 posts, read 8,695,129 times
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Yeah the alcohol dissipates with the heat, but not everyone likes the flavor of wine added to things. Lindsey, add a little milk instead for the extra moisture. You can leave out the wine and it will still taste really good.
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Old 01-24-2008, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Oxford, England
13,036 posts, read 21,513,339 times
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White wine and Kirsch are usually crucial for a good Swiss cheese fondue but I understand what you say about your little girl.
Maybe you could try a sweet wine and use only 1/2 wine and 1/2 water ( a vegetable stock is probably too strongly flavoured).
A dessert wine like Muscat or Sauternes won't have too much acidity and cutting it with water will still cut the richness if the cheese. Or why not try a non-alcoholic wine ?

Also try a chocolate fondue, perfect with fresh Strawberries, Raspberries, Bananas, Mangos and of course for kids Marshmallows ( I hate them myself ).

I adore fondues. Fun, easy to make and yummy.
Enjoy it and let me know how it went.

You can also try a "Raclette" which is delicious ( basically you melt cheese on a hot non-stick hotplate ( lots of various Raclette electrical appliances available and it's gorgeous with small baby potatoes, broccoli and good ham. ( Parma type or white ham).
Kids love it .
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Old 01-24-2008, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
10,716 posts, read 31,026,539 times
Reputation: 6654
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooseketeer View Post
White wine and Kirsch are usually crucial for a good Swiss cheese fondue but I understand what you say about your little girl.
Maybe you could try a sweet wine and use only 1/2 wine and 1/2 water ( a vegetable stock is probably too strongly flavoured).
A dessert wine like Muscat or Sauternes won't have too much acidity and cutting it with water will still cut the richness if the cheese. Or why not try a non-alcoholic wine ?

Also try a chocolate fondue, perfect with fresh Strawberries, Raspberries, Bananas, Mangos and of course for kids Marshmallows ( I hate them myself ).

I adore fondues. Fun, easy to make and yummy.
Enjoy it and let me know how it went.

You can also try a "Raclette" which is delicious ( basically you melt cheese on a hot non-stick hotplate ( lots of various Raclette electrical appliances available and it's gorgeous with small baby potatoes, broccoli and good ham. ( Parma type or white ham).
Kids love it .
I really want to try it, we have a program here called Everyday Italian and she did a fondue with Fontina and Gruyere that sounded really nice. She also browned up some pancetta and added it. She cut up focaccia as well as several other things, it looked SO good.

OH and we love chocolate Fondue, everything is better dipped in either cheese or chocolate, thats my lifes motto.
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Old 01-25-2008, 05:56 AM
 
Location: Oxford, England
13,036 posts, read 21,513,339 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lindsey_Mcfarren View Post
I really want to try it, we have a program here called Everyday Italian and she did a fondue with Fontina and Gruyere that sounded really nice. She also browned up some pancetta and added it. She cut up focaccia as well as several other things, it looked SO good.

OH and we love chocolate Fondue, everything is better dipped in either cheese or chocolate, thats my lifes motto.
Excellent and wise Motto ! Fontina and Gruyere is excellent or even a combination of Emmental , Fontina and Gruyere. It also works with blue cheese, goat's cheese etc.. but is more of an acquired taste.

We have fondues regularly as I just love the simplicity of it.
We love dipping mini frankfurters in it, baby potatoes and of course Crusty French bread. Pancetta is Yummy. Also good with Parma Ham or other cured Hams. And Normal Ham too.

Have a look for Raclette, I think you'd love it.

Have you ever had meat Fondue ( Fondue Bourguignonne) It's gorgeous.

Completely different than cheese fondue but a bit more dangerous with kids as you put very hot oil in the pan and then dip your fillet steak cubes into it. It is then served with different dipping sauces. I also love Chinese Fondue and Seafood fondue.


Fondue Recipes
Fondue Recipes
Yahoo! UK & Ireland Directory > Fondue Recipes

Raclette - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
raclette
Original Raclette Recipe
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Old 01-25-2008, 06:09 AM
RH1
 
Location: Lincoln, UK
1,160 posts, read 3,845,488 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooseketeer View Post
Have a look for Raclette, I think you'd love it.
Real comfort food! I had it in the French Alps last year at the top of the highest mountain in the resort and it was gorgeous but we were both feeling slightly nauseous from the altitude so couldn't anywhere near finish it. I was gutted. Of course we had had fondue the night before...
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Old 01-25-2008, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Oxford, England
13,036 posts, read 21,513,339 times
Reputation: 19858
Quote:
Originally Posted by RH1 View Post
Real comfort food! I had it in the French Alps last year at the top of the highest mountain in the resort and it was gorgeous but we were both feeling slightly nauseous from the altitude so couldn't anywhere near finish it. I was gutted. Of course we had had fondue the night before...

Cheese, cheese and more cheese. Now that is the reason for mountain and ski-trips isn't it ? After all those calories won't shift themselves...
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Old 01-25-2008, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
10,716 posts, read 31,026,539 times
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We did do the meat fondue where you cook the meat in the oil. It was SO good. They brought us pre marinated meats, chicken, shrimp, some vegies. That was what we had as the main course, it was SO good.

We started out with the cheese fondue, then the meat, then ended of course with the chocolate. It was such a wonderful meal, nice and relaxed.

We have this wonderful restaurant that does this here.
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Old 01-25-2008, 04:16 PM
 
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I would recommend avoiding water-based products in fondue. Fruit juice makes it awfully sweet, although I have often had fondue made with white grape juice and/or apple juice. I served as an LDS missionary in Switzerland, and some locals make it with sparkling cider, or even tomato juice. You can always use baking wine. Both chicken stock and milk can be used as additional ingredients, but I wouldn't use too much of either.

When making fondue, be sure to use at least two types of imported cheeses--one good and stinky and the other mild. It's good to throw in some cloves of garlic, salt, pepper, and Mirador (if you can find it at an import store).
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